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Johansson, B., Bärring, M., Flores-García, E., Bruch, J. & Wahlström, M. (2019). Challenges of data acquisition for simulation models of production systems in need of standards. In: Proceedings - Winter Simulation Conference: . Paper presented at 2018 Winter Simulation Conference, WSC 2018; The Swedish Exhibition and Congress Centre, Gothenburg; Sweden; 9 December 2018 through 12 December 2018 (pp. 691-702). Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Challenges of data acquisition for simulation models of production systems in need of standards
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2019 (English)In: Proceedings - Winter Simulation Conference, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2019, p. 691-702Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we analyze the challenges in data acquisition for simulation models of production systems based on two cases from the robotics and aerospace industries. Unlike prior research, we focus not only on the challenges of data acquisition but also on how these challenges affect decisions in production systems. We examine this linkage using the concepts of strategic objectives, decision areas, and internal fit from operations management literature. Empirical findings show that for data acquisition to lead to improved production system performance it is necessary to develop standards. Standards should consider ownership of data by different functions within a manufacturing company, alignment of data to performance measurements, and the connection between data, information, and production decisions. Using these concepts, this paper proposes a set of guidelines that facilitate the standardization of data acquisition for simulation models in production systems. We conclude by discussing the managerial implications of our findings. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2019
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-42945 (URN)10.1109/WSC.2018.8632463 (DOI)000461414100056 ()2-s2.0-85062603218 (Scopus ID)9781538665725 (ISBN)
Conference
2018 Winter Simulation Conference, WSC 2018; The Swedish Exhibition and Congress Centre, Gothenburg; Sweden; 9 December 2018 through 12 December 2018
Available from: 2019-03-22 Created: 2019-03-22 Last updated: 2019-06-04Bibliographically approved
Badasjane, V., Bruch, J., Johansson, P. & Chirumalla, K. (2019). Critical interfaces for managing international manufacturing networks – A literature review. In: 26 th EurOMA Conference EurOMA: . Paper presented at 26 th EurOMA Conference EurOMA, 17 Jun 2019, Helsinki, Finland.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Critical interfaces for managing international manufacturing networks – A literature review
2019 (English)In: 26 th EurOMA Conference EurOMA, 2019Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Engineering and Technology Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-43933 (URN)
Conference
26 th EurOMA Conference EurOMA, 17 Jun 2019, Helsinki, Finland
Projects
COPE: Core Plant Excellence
Available from: 2019-06-19 Created: 2019-06-19 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
Johansson, P., Bruch, J., Badasjane, V., Granlund, A. & Rösiö, C. (2019). Exploring the integration process of new practices for knowledge sharing. In: 26 th EurOMA Conference EurOMA: . Paper presented at 26 th EurOMA Conference EurOMA, 17 Jun 2019, Helsinki, Finland.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring the integration process of new practices for knowledge sharing
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2019 (English)In: 26 th EurOMA Conference EurOMA, 2019Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The aim of this paper is to provide new perspectives on the implementation of new operations management practices by applying three different but interrelated frameworks: Human Interaction Dynamics, Normalization Process Theory, and Professional competence as ways of being. The empirical material in this paper is based on a case study within a global manufacturing company, and more specific the development and implementation of a new OM practice for knowledge sharing at one of the sites in Sweden. A mixed-method approach is used, and the empirical material is collected through analysis of a database, two group interviews, and a survey.

National Category
Engineering and Technology Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-43934 (URN)
Conference
26 th EurOMA Conference EurOMA, 17 Jun 2019, Helsinki, Finland
Projects
COPE: Core Plant Excellence
Available from: 2019-06-19 Created: 2019-06-19 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved
Granlund, A., Rosio, C., Bruch, J. & Johansson, P. (2019). Lead factory operationalisation and challenges. Production planning & control (Print), 30(2-3), 96-111
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lead factory operationalisation and challenges
2019 (English)In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 30, no 2-3, p. 96-111Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper deepens the understanding of the lead factory concept by examining how the lead factory role is operationalised and what challenges are associated with it. The research is based on an explorative case study of eight Swedish lead factories in the manufacturing industry. The empirical findings suggest that the understanding of the lead factory concept should be extended as it is not restricted to one type of set-up. The findings show a spectrum ranging from an entire manufacturing plant, parts of a plant, to a virtual plant considered to be the lead factory. The research also shows a broad range of challenges experienced by lead factories. Several of these are related to and originate from unclear role, responsibility and mandate of the lead factory. The lack of dedicated resources for lead factory activities, specifically long-term development and difficulties in measuring the benefits of the role, were other challenges faced.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2019
Keywords
Lead factory, plant roles, site characteristics, manufacturing networks, global operations management
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-43296 (URN)10.1080/09537287.2018.1534292 (DOI)000465008000002 ()2-s2.0-85064548687 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-05-02 Created: 2019-05-02 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved
Chirumalla, K., Jackson, M., Bruch, J., Andersson, N. & Löv, R. (2018). Exploring feedback loops in the industrialization process: A case study. In: Procedia Manufacturing: . Paper presented at 8th Swedish Production Symposium, SPS 2018, 16 May 2018 through 18 May 2018 (pp. 169-176). Elsevier B.V.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring feedback loops in the industrialization process: A case study
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2018 (English)In: Procedia Manufacturing, Elsevier B.V. , 2018, p. 169-176Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this study is to explore the current available practices of feedback loops at different phases in the industrialization process. Although literature highlights the impact of feedback loops for both product and production systems development, there is limited research about how firms utilize the concept of feedback loops in the industrialization process. Based on a case study at a railway component manufacturing company, the paper presents the identified feedback loops and mechanisms that are working well and not working well within the industrialization process. Further, it explains a practical method to improve the current or establish new feedback loops. The paper contributes to the discussion on the application of lean and agile approaches to the industrialization process where feedback loops act as enablers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier B.V., 2018
Keywords
Experience feedback, feedback loops, knowledge management, new product introduction, organizational learning
National Category
Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-43508 (URN)10.1016/j.promfg.2018.06.071 (DOI)2-s2.0-85065642445 (Scopus ID)
Conference
8th Swedish Production Symposium, SPS 2018, 16 May 2018 through 18 May 2018
Available from: 2019-05-27 Created: 2019-05-27 Last updated: 2019-05-27Bibliographically approved
Rosio, C. & Bruch, J. (2018). Exploring the design process of reconfigurable industrial production systems Activities, challenges, and tactics. Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, 29(1), 85-103
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring the design process of reconfigurable industrial production systems Activities, challenges, and tactics
2018 (English)In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 85-103Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore activities, challenges, and suggest tactics for the design of industrial reconfigurable production systems that can easily adapt to changing market opportunities. Design/methodology/approach - The paper synthesizes the empirical findings of seven case studies including 47 in-depth interviews at four manufacturing companies. Findings - A conceptual production system design process and including activities that enables a long-term perspective considering reconfigurability is proposed. Additionally, critical challenges indicating that reconfigurable production system design is not a trivial issue but one that requires separate control and coordination are identified and tactics to overcome the challenges described. Research limitations/implications - The authors propose a process for designing reconfigurable production systems that are better suited to adjust to future needs. The knowledge of reconfigurability from the reconfigurable manufacturing system literature is applied in the general production system literature field. This study contributes to a clearer picture of managerial challenges that need to be dealt with when designing a reconfigurable production system. Practical implications - By clarifying key activities facilitating a long-term perspective in the design process and highlighting challenges and tactics for improvement, the findings are particularly relevant to production engineers and plant managers interested in increasing the ability to adapt to future changes through reconfigurability and improve the efficiency of their production system design process. Originality/value - Although reconfigurable production systems are critical for the success of manufacturing companies, the process of designing such systems is not clear. This paper stretches this by giving a comprehensive picture of the production system design process and the activities that need to be considered to meet these challenges.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
EMERALD GROUP PUBLISHING LTD, 2018
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-38011 (URN)10.1108/JMTM-06-2016-0090 (DOI)000418928000004 ()2-s2.0-85037168340 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-01-11 Created: 2018-01-11 Last updated: 2018-11-28Bibliographically approved
Flores-García, E., Wiktorsson, M., Bruch, J. & Jackson, M. (2018). Revisiting challenges in using Discrete Event Simulation in early stages of Production System Design. In: International conference of advances in production management systems APMS: . Paper presented at International conference of advances in production management systems APMS, 27 Aug 2018, Seoul, South Korea (pp. 534-540). Springer, 535
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Revisiting challenges in using Discrete Event Simulation in early stages of Production System Design
2018 (English)In: International conference of advances in production management systems APMS, Springer, 2018, Vol. 535, p. 534-540Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper presents challenges of using discrete event simulation when supporting decision in early stages of production system design, when significant changes are introduced. It was based on three real-time case studies performed at one manufacturing company during 2014-2016. Challenges in the cases were mapped to previous literature, pointing out discrepancies and highlighting three additional challenges, specifically related to issues in the early stages of the pro-duction system design process. The significant change introduced to the assembly system, and the early phases of evaluation put significant challenges to the use of discrete event simulation and the study points out further efforts needed to support manufacturing companies under change, with an established industrial structure and legacy systems to consider.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
production system design, discrete event simulation, case study.
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-40903 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-99704-9_65 (DOI)2-s2.0-85053277124 (Scopus ID)978-3-319-99703-2 (ISBN)978-3-319-99704-9 (ISBN)
Conference
International conference of advances in production management systems APMS, 27 Aug 2018, Seoul, South Korea
Available from: 2018-09-12 Created: 2018-09-12 Last updated: 2018-09-27Bibliographically approved
Flores-García, E., Ruiz Zúñiga, E., Bruch, J., Urenda Moris, M. & Syberfeldtb, A. (2018). Simulation-based Optimization for Facility Layout Design in Conditions of High Uncertainty. Paper presented at 51st CIRP Conference on Manufacturing Systems, CIRP CMS 2018; Stockholm Waterfront Congress CentreStockholm; Sweden; 16 May 2018 through 18 May 2018; Code 137494. Procedia CIRP, 72
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Simulation-based Optimization for Facility Layout Design in Conditions of High Uncertainty
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2018 (English)In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 72, p. -339Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite the increased use of Simulation based Optimization, the design of facility layout is challenged by high levels of uncertainty associated with new production processes. Addressing this issue, this paper aims to understand the conceptual modeling activities of Simulation-based Optimization for facility layout design in conditions of high uncertainty. Based on three in-depth case studies, the results of this paper show how characterization criteria of production systems can be used in conceptual modelling to reduce uncertainty. These results may be essential to support managers and stakeholders during the introduction of new production processes in the design of facility layouts.

Keywords
uncertainty reduction, simulation based optimization, facility layout, decision support, production system design
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-39272 (URN)10.1016/j.procir.2018.03.227 (DOI)2-s2.0-85049552085 (Scopus ID)
Conference
51st CIRP Conference on Manufacturing Systems, CIRP CMS 2018; Stockholm Waterfront Congress CentreStockholm; Sweden; 16 May 2018 through 18 May 2018; Code 137494
Projects
INNOFACTURE - innovative manufacturing development
Available from: 2018-05-23 Created: 2018-05-23 Last updated: 2019-10-15Bibliographically approved
Ahlskog, M., Bruch, J. & Jackson, M. (2017). Knowledge integration in manufacturing technology development. Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, 28(8), 1035-1054
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Knowledge integration in manufacturing technology development
2017 (English)In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 1035-1054Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyze knowledge integration in manufacturing technology development projects required to build competitive advantages. Design/methodology/approach - A longitudinal case study has been conducted at a Swedish manufacturing company by following a manufacturing technology development project in real time during a two-year period. Findings - The results show that three different knowledge integration processes exist when developing unique manufacturing technology: processes for capturing, for joint learning, and for absorb learning. The findings of the current research suggest that the three knowledge integration processes are highly interrelated with each knowledge integration process affecting the other two. Research limitations/implications - The major limitation of the research is primarily associated with the single case, which limits generalizability outside the context that was studied. Practical implications - The findings are particularly relevant to manufacturing engineers working with the development of new manufacturing technologies. By using relevant knowledge integration processes and capabilities required to integrate the knowledge in manufacturing technology development projects, companies can improve design and organize the development of manufacturing technology. Originality/value - Previous research has merely noted that knowledge integration is required in the development of unique manufacturing technology, but without explaining how and in what way. This paper's contribution is the identification and analysis of three knowledge integration processes that contribute to the building of competitive advantages by developing unique manufacturing technology and new knowledge.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
EMERALD GROUP PUBLISHING LTD, 2017
Keywords
Manufacturing industry, Manufacturing technology, Knowledge processes, Organizational learning, Competitive advantage, Capabilities, Manufacturing competences, Knowledge development, Technology novelty, Knowledge integration process
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-37230 (URN)10.1108/JMTM-03-2017-0051 (DOI)000413658900003 ()2-s2.0-85032306693 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-11-09 Created: 2017-11-09 Last updated: 2017-11-09Bibliographically approved
Javadi, S., Bruch, J. & Bellgran, M. (2016). Characteristics of product introduction process in low-volume manufacturing industries: A case study. Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, 27(4), 535-559
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characteristics of product introduction process in low-volume manufacturing industries: A case study
2016 (English)In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, ISSN 1741038X, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 535-559Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to understand how the characteristics of low-volume manufacturing industries influence the product introduction process and factors which can facilitate that process in low-volume manufacturing industries.

Design/methodology/approach: A literature review in combination with a multiple-case study were used to achieve the purpose of the paper. The multiple-case study was based on two product development projects in a low-volume manufacturing company.

Findings: The main identified characteristics of the product introduction process in low-volume manufacturing industries were a low number of prototypes, absence of conventional production ramp-up, reduced complexity of the process, failure to consider the manufacturability of the products due to an extensive focus on their functionality, and increased complexity of resource allocation. It was determined that knowledge and experiences from prior production of similar products could serve as a facilitator of the manufacturing process.

Research limitations/implications: The main limitation of this study is that the identified characteristics and facilitating factors are confined to the internal variables of the studied company. A study of the role of external variables during the product introduction process such as suppliers and customers could be the subject of future studies.

Practical implications: This research will provide practitioners in low-volume manufacturing industries with general insight about the characteristics of the product introduction process and the aspects that should be considered during the process.

Keywords
Product development; Production system development; Design-production interface; Low-volume products; industrialisation process
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Innovation and Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-27843 (URN)10.1108/JMTM-03-2015-0017 (DOI)000379664200004 ()2-s2.0-84971357127 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Available from: 2015-04-17 Created: 2015-04-17 Last updated: 2019-01-15Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5963-2470

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