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Lindhult, E., Chirumalla, K., Oghazi, P. & Parida, V. (2018). Value logics for service innovation: practice-driven implications for service-dominant logic. Service Business: An International Journal, 12(3), 457-481
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Value logics for service innovation: practice-driven implications for service-dominant logic
2018 (English)In: Service Business: An International Journal, ISSN 1862-8516, E-ISSN 1862-8508, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 457-481Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Service-dominant logic (SDL) provides a conceptual understanding of and widens the view on value creation in service innovation for product-centric companies. However, empirical research linking SDL and service innovation is still limited albeit expanding. This study provides insights beyond existing discussions on product and service dimensions using the theoretical lens of the value logic perspective. More specifically, the purpose of this study is to examine how value can be understood, targeted, and created in the pursuit of service innovation by product-centric manufacturing companies. Building on a previous investigation of two multinational product-centric manufacturing companies, this paper identifies and develops a theoretical model to describe the space shift in service innovation with four different kinds of value logics, namely, product-based value logic, service-based value logic, virtual-based value logic, and systemic-based value logic. Using a digitalization-driven new service innovation, namely the My Control System, which is a web-based service delivery platform, this paper describes space shifts to enhance value through four value logics as efforts. Further, challenges associated with different value logics are described in terms of complexity traps and service gaps. The study also contributes to bridging the gap between SDL theory and practice by developing a midrange theoretical model for value creation as a specification and amendment to SDL that supports SDL-guided service innovation and servitization in practice.

Keywords
Servitization, Product service system, Advance services, Value co-creation, Digitalization, Business model innovation
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-38630 (URN)10.1007/s11628-018-0361-1 (DOI)000440150700002 ()2-s2.0-85040765717 (Scopus ID)
Projects
XPRES - Excellence in Production ResearchSIMGIC - Service Innovation Management in Global Industrial Companies
Available from: 2018-03-06 Created: 2018-03-06 Last updated: 2018-11-05Bibliographically approved
Read, S. & Lindhult, E. (2016). Technology and transition: 'progressive evolution of regimes and the consequences for energy regime change. Paper presented at Applied Energy Symposium and Summit - Low Carbon Cities and Urban Energy Systems (CUE), NOV 15-17, 2015, Fuzhou, PEOPLES R CHINA. Energy Procedia, 88(1), 9-15
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Technology and transition: 'progressive evolution of regimes and the consequences for energy regime change
2016 (English)In: Energy Procedia, ISSN 1876-6102, E-ISSN 1876-6102, Vol. 88, no 1, p. 9-15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Transition of energy systems has been under-theorised. We have argued previously that energy efficiency as a strategy for fossil fuel replacement is inadequate as energy demand is not being reduced by efficiency alone. This paper is intended to elaborate further on the reasons. We require better answers to better questions about the nature of energy regimes and how they resist change. Our present-day socio-technical energy regime is a global integrated technical arrangement based on cheap high-yield energy sources (fossil fuels) with built-in 'progressive' social and economic directions. This 'progressive' change relies on cheap energy as a resource towards ever greater global integration and economic efficiency. Energy regime change will be not a tinkering at the edges but will require a dismantling of this 'progressive' tendency with radical retrogressive economic and social consequences. We conclude a change of our relationship with energy will require the reversal of a contingent 'progressive' tendency that is as old as mankind and the necessarily modest building of a new infrastructural apparatus designed to a new 'end', or the reversion to previous low or lower demand apparatus based on non-fossil energy sources. Both solutions would imply major social and economic changes which we will deal with in another paper. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, 2016
Keywords
energy transition, urban energy system, socio-technical systems, systemic lock-in
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-38117 (URN)10.1016/j.egypro.2016.06.004 (DOI)000387975200002 ()2-s2.0-85007551045 (Scopus ID)
Conference
Applied Energy Symposium and Summit - Low Carbon Cities and Urban Energy Systems (CUE), NOV 15-17, 2015, Fuzhou, PEOPLES R CHINA
Available from: 2018-01-22 Created: 2018-01-22 Last updated: 2018-01-29Bibliographically approved
Read, S., Lindhult, E. & Mashayekhi, A. (2016). The inefficiencies of energy efficiency: Reviewing the strategic role of energy efficiency and its effectiveness in alleviating climate change. Journal of Settlements and Spatial Planning, 2016(Spec. Iss. 5), 77-87
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The inefficiencies of energy efficiency: Reviewing the strategic role of energy efficiency and its effectiveness in alleviating climate change
2016 (English)In: Journal of Settlements and Spatial Planning, ISSN 2069-3419, Vol. 2016, no Spec. Iss. 5, p. 77-87Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Our present economy is high-energy and demand-intensive, demand met through the use of high energy yield fossil fuels. Energy efficiency and renewable energy sources are proposed as the solution and named the ‘twin pillars’ of sustainable energy policy. Increasing energy efficiencies are expected to reduce energy demand and fossil fuel use and allow renewables to close the ‘replacement gap’. However, the simple fact is that fossil fuel use is still rising to meet increasing global demand and even when demand is stabilised, the substantial energy efficiencies achieved are not delivering the expected reductions in energy demand. The net effect is that efficiencies are gained and renewable energy use is increasing, even though the replacement of fossils is not an immediately plausible possibility. This points to the under-theorised problems in the ‘efficiency and replacement’ formula. We argue the need to pay closer attention to the ‘systemicity’ of the problem and to the technical and practical systems involved in energy demand. There are a number of detailed reasons why the ‘efficiency and replacement’ equation has become problematic (‘globality’, energy yield, ‘rebound’ and ‘momentum’ effects) and we include a short review of these and relate them to our ‘systemicity’ argument. We argue there is a need for better thinking, but also for a new primary instrument to drastically reduce energy demand and fossil fuel use. Attention should be urgently shifted from gains in energy efficiency to substantial year-over-year reductions in demand.

Keywords
Energy demand, Energy efficiency, Energy sustainability, Energy systems, Infrastructures, Sustainable energy policy
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-31238 (URN)000408238100008 ()2-s2.0-84958741381 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-03-03 Created: 2016-03-03 Last updated: 2017-09-07Bibliographically approved
Chirumalla, K. & Lindhult, E. (2015). Organizing Experience Feedback Loops for Continuous Innovation. In: 16th International Continuous Innovation Network Conference CINet 15: . Paper presented at 16th International Continuous Innovation Network Conference CINet 15, 13-15 Sep 2015, Stockholm, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Organizing Experience Feedback Loops for Continuous Innovation
2015 (English)In: 16th International Continuous Innovation Network Conference CINet 15, 2015Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-28157 (URN)
Conference
16th International Continuous Innovation Network Conference CINet 15, 13-15 Sep 2015, Stockholm, Sweden
Projects
SIMGIC - Service Innovation Management in Global Industrial Companies
Available from: 2015-06-12 Created: 2015-06-08 Last updated: 2015-06-12Bibliographically approved
Lindhult, E. (2015). Towards democratic scientific inquiry?: Participatory democracy, philosophy of science and the future of action research. In: Action Research for Democracy: New Ideas and Perspectives from Scandinavia (pp. 199-215). Taylor and Francis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards democratic scientific inquiry?: Participatory democracy, philosophy of science and the future of action research
2015 (English)In: Action Research for Democracy: New Ideas and Perspectives from Scandinavia, Taylor and Francis , 2015, p. 199-215Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

One common feature of different variants of Action Research and Interactive Research is the rejection of technocratic, undemocratic streaks in science and inquiry, particularly those emanating from different aspects of the still quite strong positivist and contemplative academic heritage (Toulmin 2001). Action Research was, from the Lewinian start, already seen as a form of research to further the democratic process. A basic impetus in Participatory Action Research and Interactive Research is bringing practitioners into the scientific research process (Fals-Borda & Rahman 1991; Nielsen & Svensson 2006). This chapter will focus on the explicit or implicit democratising ambitions and tendencies in many of these types of approaches. I believe most of us value democracy and would see science as in service to it. The point here is to take the argument a step further in line with a position of a leading researcher in the field of Acton Research, who wrote, “Democracy does not only function as ‘something that is good’, but also as a theory of science point of departure-as the system of thought underlying the construction of the concept and-at a later stage-the survey of ‘facts’ and shaping of praxis” (Gustavsen 1990, p. 98). Democratising science raises the question of whether science will become more or less scientific? How can participatory democracy contribute to the scientific quality of inquiry? Or does it stifle it? Will the democratising researcher lose scientific perspective and become a political activist or a consultant-be it of a managerial or emancipatory kind? How can the academic researcher be engaged, useful and democratic-as well as scientific-at the same time? The purpose of the chapter is to develop a number of different arguments for taking participatory democracy not only as an extra-scientific value that, however commendable, should not disturb the scientific process, but as a comparatively advantageous philosophy of science orientation for Action and Interactive Research (see, e.g. Novotny, Scott & Gibbons 2001; Toulmin & Gustavsen 1996). I develop five types of arguments-empirical, epistemological, moral, institutional and political-which commend participatory democracy as a philosophy of science point of departure.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor and Francis, 2015
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-43079 (URN)10.4324/9781315659909 (DOI)2-s2.0-85062073299 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-04-11 Created: 2019-04-11 Last updated: 2019-04-11Bibliographically approved
Lindhult, E., Hazy, J. K., Midgley, G. & Chirumalla, K. (2015). Value driven innovation in industrial companies: A complexity approach. In: The XXVI ISPIM Innovation Conference ISPIM'15: . Paper presented at The XXVI ISPIM Innovation Conference ISPIM'15, 14-17 Jun 2015, Budapest, Hungary.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Value driven innovation in industrial companies: A complexity approach
2015 (English)In: The XXVI ISPIM Innovation Conference ISPIM'15, 2015Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this research is to contribute to the development of an interactive, systemic and ecosystem view of innovation and its management. This emerging interactive and systematic view of innovation labeled as Value Driven Innovation in this research, where enhanced symbiotic value is continuously discovered and realized in interactive processes among stakeholders such as customers, providers, suppliers and related partners. The main outcome of the research is a complexity conceptualization of value driven innovation, which synthesizes and extends to value-driven innovation management recent developments in complexity science. In addition, the findings may provide useful tools to clarify and enhance the manageability of innovation in the face of complexity, uncertainty and unpredictability.

Keywords
Value, Value-in-use, Joint value discovery, Value driven innovation, Service innovation, Complexity, Leadership practices, Systemic innovation, Innovation models.
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-28158 (URN)
Conference
The XXVI ISPIM Innovation Conference ISPIM'15, 14-17 Jun 2015, Budapest, Hungary
Projects
SIMGIC - Service Innovation Management in Global Industrial Companies
Available from: 2015-06-08 Created: 2015-06-08 Last updated: 2015-06-08Bibliographically approved
Lindhult, E. & Hazy, J. K. (2014). Complexity approach to joint value discovery in service innovation management. In: The Proceedings of The XXV ISPIM Conference 2014 Dublin, Ireland - 8-11 June 2014: . Paper presented at The XXV ISPIM Conference 2014 Dublin, Ireland - 8-11 June 2014. Dublin, Ireland
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Complexity approach to joint value discovery in service innovation management
2014 (English)In: The Proceedings of The XXV ISPIM Conference 2014 Dublin, Ireland - 8-11 June 2014, Dublin, Ireland, 2014Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The paper describes how complexity notions can be useful to model Servitization dynamics in industrial companies moving from product based to service oriented configuration. It is a movement towards joint value discovery in industrial service innovation management increasing potentials for radical or architectural innovation. Based on process oriented research on global industrial companies identifying transition phases of Servitization, a complexity model is developed to understand, predict and guide the process, mechanisms, and outcomes of increased capacity for joint value discovery. The model synthesizes and extends to service innovation management a complexity approach originally introduced by Goldstein, Hazy and Lichtenstein (2010) and called the Cusp of Change Model. The theoretical developments are particularly useful in guiding leadership of innovation in broader organizational and networked settings, contributing to development of service innovation strategies as well as systemic leadership of innovation activity in services in global industrial companies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dublin, Ireland: , 2014
National Category
Engineering and Technology Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-28107 (URN)978-952-265-591-2 (ISBN)
Conference
The XXV ISPIM Conference 2014 Dublin, Ireland - 8-11 June 2014
Projects
SIMGIC - Service Innovation Management in Global Industrial Companies
Available from: 2015-06-08 Created: 2015-06-08 Last updated: 2015-06-08Bibliographically approved
Lindhult, E., Karlsson, H., Öberg, C., Bessant, J. & Johansson, P. (2014). Quality in innovation management auditing. In: : . Paper presented at The XXV ISPIM Conference – Innovation for Sustainable Economy & Society, Dublin, Ireland.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quality in innovation management auditing
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2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Innovation management auditing (IMA) is valuable to assessinnovation capability. A review of literature shows that research-based IMAmodelsare few and there are considerable variations in IMA-related researchand models. The quality of different models is often unclear or limited. Thepurpose of this paper is to clarify the basis for valid and reliable auditingthrough discussing and developing a quality framework. Findings point to thatthere are different aims and purposes of IMA; measuring, learning about orchanging innovation capability as well as improved business performancethrough capability enhancement. Different aims imply different focus andformulation of quality to be achieved through IMA efforts. A qualityframework for IMA is developed based on aims and the trustworthiness (validity, reliability and objectivity) in achieving respective aims. Theframework is proposed as a way to assess quality of different models, as aguide to enhance quality through research, and for practitioners to use modelsand tools in a quality-conscious way.

Keywords
Audit; Innovation Management; Innovation Performance Measurement; Objectivity; Quality; Reliability; Validity
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Innovation and Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-27180 (URN)
Conference
The XXV ISPIM Conference – Innovation for Sustainable Economy & Society, Dublin, Ireland
Available from: 2014-12-19 Created: 2014-12-19 Last updated: 2018-02-22Bibliographically approved
Björkman, H., Lindhult, E. & Öberg, C. (2013). Angels and demons – The religion of Innovation?. In: The Proceedings of The XXIV ISPIM Conference - Innovating in Global Markets: Challenges for Sustainable Growth Conference. Paper presented at The XXIV ISPIM Conference - Innovating in Global Markets, Helsinki, Finland on 16 to 19 June 2013.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Angels and demons – The religion of Innovation?
2013 (English)In: The Proceedings of The XXIV ISPIM Conference - Innovating in Global Markets: Challenges for Sustainable Growth Conference, 2013Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

History anticipates a link between religion and innovation, and religious aspects could be expected to impact also current innovation activities, positive or negative. This paper describes and discusses the relations between innovation and religion by means of a systematic literature review. The review points to six different causal claims between religion and innovation: (i) the Church as a platform for innovation and entrepreneurship; (ii) religion enabling or inhibiting innovation adaptation and diffusion; (iii) spirituality and ethics, and their relation to innovation, organisational development and human relation management; (iv) creation and utilisation of innovations in religious settings; (v) doctrinal innovation; and (vi) religion as scientific underpinning. This evokes an initiative for further studies on religion and innovation, and contributes to current understanding through providing a first-of-its kind literature review.

National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-22888 (URN)978-952-265-421-2 (ISBN)
Conference
The XXIV ISPIM Conference - Innovating in Global Markets, Helsinki, Finland on 16 to 19 June 2013
Available from: 2013-11-20 Created: 2013-11-19 Last updated: 2015-11-16Bibliographically approved
Hafting, T. & Lindhult, E. (2013). Developing collaborative power in working life: linking American pragmatism and action research. In: Kelemen, M. & Rumens, N (Ed.), American Pragmatism and Organisation: Issues and Controversies (pp. 205-222). Gower Publishing Ltd.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developing collaborative power in working life: linking American pragmatism and action research
2013 (English)In: American Pragmatism and Organisation: Issues and Controversies / [ed] Kelemen, M. & Rumens, N, Gower Publishing Ltd., 2013, p. 205-222Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Gower Publishing Ltd., 2013
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-23322 (URN)9781409427865 (ISBN)
Available from: 2013-12-13 Created: 2013-12-10 Last updated: 2015-11-13Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1902-5155

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