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Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie, PhDORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0012-7127
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Publications (10 of 33) Show all publications
Gottlieb, L. & Andersson Schaeffer, J. (2022). Teatime: Exploring ways to support diverse narratives on sustainability through design. The Design Journal, 25(1), 44-61
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teatime: Exploring ways to support diverse narratives on sustainability through design
2022 (English)In: The Design Journal, ISSN 1460-6925, E-ISSN 1756-3062, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 44-61Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the design research community, diverse narratives and ontologies are discussed in relation to sustainability. Relational ontology is proposed as an alternative to the dominant dualist ontology as a way to reconnect people with their ecological embeddedness and responsibility. This work presents a dialogical tool called 'teatime' created to introduce diverse, immaterial perspectives on sustainability in a co-design project with youth and researchers. The study explores the role of the teatime design in eliciting diverse narratives and forming a dialogical space. The results show that the teatime supported reflections on immaterial perspectives, bringing out relational and social values related to the ecological crises. This study uses a systematic evaluation to reveal a micro-material perspective on ways in which the teatime design and facilitation supported the inquiry process. We propose that the design practitioners take on the role of crafting dialogical spaces that support social relationships and evoke immaterial perspectives.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2022
Keywords
Diverse narratives, sustainability, Playful Trigger, Commensality, relational ontology, systematic evaluation
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-57248 (URN)10.1080/14606925.2021.2004724 (DOI)000749855300004 ()2-s2.0-85124067317 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-02-09 Created: 2022-02-09 Last updated: 2023-04-20Bibliographically approved
Heikkila, M. & Andersson Schaeffer, J. (2022). The Provotype as a methodological exploration in educational research. International Journal of Research and Method in Education
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Provotype as a methodological exploration in educational research
2022 (English)In: International Journal of Research and Method in Education, ISSN 1743-727X, E-ISSN 1743-7288Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Preschool, understood as being both a physical and psychological environment, is, according to objectives in national curriculum, required to be inclusive for all those who attend it. Previous studies have identified the stereotypical norms of several everyday activities of preschools, including both interactions and premises. The aim of this article is to present and discuss a possible methodological idea of a 'provotype' as a model for re-representing empirical analysis based on different data types that are combined in a research process. Research concerning provotypes will be presented. The research method will be presented in detail and the analytical process described. In the results section, the provotype and its aspects will be presented. Both during the work with the provotype as well as afterwards we have learned that working with the 'provotyping (what we like to call the whole process of analysing the results, visualizing, discussing the form of it and our reactions to the provotype) involves several phases of exproration and those phases includes uncertainty. A provotype might be a good way of re-illustrating, or as we put it re-representing, results from case studies with a number of different data, as in this study.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2022
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-57424 (URN)10.1080/1743727X.2022.2035353 (DOI)000752260600001 ()2-s2.0-85124358414 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-02-16 Created: 2022-02-16 Last updated: 2023-04-13Bibliographically approved
Andersson Schaeffer, J., Komazec, K., Vaara, E., Strineholm, A. & Tobiasson, H. (2022). Whose place is it?: Enacted territories in the museum. In: DRS2022, DRS Conference Proceedings: . Paper presented at DRS2022: Bilbao, 25 June - 3 July, Bilbao, Spain.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Whose place is it?: Enacted territories in the museum
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2022 (English)In: DRS2022, DRS Conference Proceedings, 2022Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

 There is a growing trend to embrace the idea of public participation in the work of museums, from exhibition design to collections. To further develop participatory cultures in museums, these negotiations and emerging practices should be examined more closely. This paper explores a museum’s whole-hearted attempt to engage with the societal issue of climate change and work with a high degree of participationfrom civic society when staging a temporary exhibition. We investigate experiences inthe process of building, measuring, separating and transgressing during the collaboration. Based on these explorations the paper presents three emerging and interconnected territories in the staging of participatory temporary exhibitions, the territory of aesthetics, the territory of action (autonomy), and the territory of unpredictability. The result contributes to research on public participatory practices mainly in museum context

Keywords
design, territory, participation, unpredictability
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-60173 (URN)
Conference
DRS2022: Bilbao, 25 June - 3 July, Bilbao, Spain
Available from: 2022-10-10 Created: 2022-10-10 Last updated: 2022-10-10Bibliographically approved
Schaeffer, J., Ryöppy, M., Reitsma, L., Larsen, H., Nyström, S., Hayley, H., . . . Blom Allalouf, A. (2020). Carbon Dioxide Theatre: at the museum (1ed.). Västerås: Västmanlands läns museum
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Carbon Dioxide Theatre: at the museum
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2020 (English)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Alternative title[sv]
Koldioxidteater : på museum
Abstract [en]

This book is about the Carbon Dioxide Theatre project, in which we explored how participatory theatre and participatory design can be used in a museum to create engagement with climate issues.

The Carbon Dioxide Theatre project focused on young people’s ability to reflect on and critically review social norms and practices around climate targets and carbon dioxide emissions, although the process affected all participants. Objects from the museum’s existing collections were central to the project to create reflections on past and present social norms.

With this text, we want to inspire you to explore how museums can develop new ways of working with collections and communication related to our cultural heritage and contemporary global challenges.

In the text, we have mixed descriptions of the process and the methods with personal stories from us in the project in order to share as many different perspectives of the project as possible with you. We hope that you will get inspired!

Abstract [sv]

Hur kan teater och design användas på ett museum för att skapa engagemang för jordens klimat?

Den här boken handlar om projektet Koldioxidteater där vi undersökte den frågan. Koldioxidteater på Västmanlands läns museum var ett projekt som förenade ungdomar, museipersonal, forskare, skådespelare och andra intresserade. Projektet fokuserade på att stödja unga människors förmåga att reflektera över och kritiskt granska sociala normer och praxis kring klimatmål och koldioxidutsläpp. Föremål från museets samlingar, utställningar och museets pedagogiska rekvisita var centrala i projektet för att stödja reflektionerna över sociala normer.

Unga människor var vår målgrupp men processen visade sig påverka alla deltagare och museet på olika sätt. Med den här boken vill vi inspirera dig till att utforska hur museer kan utveckla nya sätt att arbeta tillsammans med besökare för att ta sig an samtidens globala utmaningar. I texten har vi blandat beskrivningar av projektet, processen och metoderna med personliga berättelser från oss som deltog för att kunna dela så många olika perspektiv av projektet som möjligt med dig. Vi hoppas att du ska bli inspirerad att utveckla arbetssätt och metoder vidare!

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Västerås: Västmanlands läns museum, 2020. p. 108 Edition: 1
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Research subject
Innovation and Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-50187 (URN)
Projects
Koldioxidteater på Västmanlands läns museum
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Note

The book have two fulltext editions. One in English and one in Swedish.

Available from: 2020-09-15 Created: 2020-09-15 Last updated: 2020-11-12Bibliographically approved
Brunklaus, B., Reitsma, L., Andersson Schaeffer, J., Ryöppy, M., Ho, H. & Nyström, S. (2019). Carbon theatre in public spaces: Using participatory theatre and co-designmethods in a museum for shaping lowcarbon lifestyles. In: Life Cycle Management Conference 2019: . Paper presented at Life Cycle Management Conference 2019. Poznan, Polen, Article ID 97.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Carbon theatre in public spaces: Using participatory theatre and co-designmethods in a museum for shaping lowcarbon lifestyles
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2019 (English)In: Life Cycle Management Conference 2019, Poznan, Polen, 2019, article id 97Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Over the past ten years, the need for public spaces to deal with burning societal issues, such as climate change, has become even more important. Participatory theatre offers ways to meet the longing for shared forums by engaging large groups of people in exploring difficult social dilemmas. It can potentially empower participants to change their own situations and organizations. In a previous design research project Quantifying your carbon footprint, this gap was in focus. We will use the findings from the Quantifying carbon footprint project as an entry point and expand it with Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) on objects from the current museum collection and on daily life activities that have a carbon impact. The goal of the project is to explore and understand the climate and environmental impacts of lifestyles. The method used here are participatory theatre and co-design methods and pop-up exhibitions are used to engage young citizens in negotiating social norms and understanding their possible impact on CO2 emissions. The museum collections play a crucial role in the process of understanding how LCA calculations are related to mundane objects and reflecting on the temporality of social norms that are negotiated and re-negotiated through the way we handle products and objects in our everyday life. Developing new practices for museums involving participatory methods in order to engage young citizens in climate research. The results of the introductory meeting and study visit show that using the museum’s collection, the history and the value of things in the past centuries become clear and easier to reflect on compared to today’s unsustainable lifestyle – travelling and over consumption. Carbon Dioxide Theatre is an attempt to shape a shared space on a local level, in line with the priorities of the museum’s three years plan.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Poznan, Polen: , 2019
Series
Life Cycle Management Conference 2019
Keywords
Carbon, theatre, design, participatory methods, young citizen
National Category
Design Performing Art Studies Environmental Sciences Climate Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-50185 (URN)
Conference
Life Cycle Management Conference 2019
Projects
Carbon Theatre
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2020-09-15 Created: 2020-09-15 Last updated: 2020-11-16Bibliographically approved
Johansson, P. E., Karlsson, H., Backström, T., Andersson Schaeffer, J. & Cedergren, S. (2019). Let us measure, then what?: Exploring purposeful use of innovation management self-assessments.. International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, 36(10), 1734-1749
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Let us measure, then what?: Exploring purposeful use of innovation management self-assessments.
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2019 (English)In: International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, ISSN 0265-671X, E-ISSN 1758-6682, Vol. 36, no 10, p. 1734-1749Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to increase the understanding regarding how managers attempt to make purposeful use of innovation management self-assessments (IMSA) and performance information (PI).

Design/methodology/approach

An interpretative perspective on purposeful use is used as an analytical framework, and the paper is based on empirical material from two research projects exploring the use of IMSA and PI in three case companies. Based on the empirical data, consisting of interviews and observations of workshops and project meetings, qualitative content analysis has been conducted.

Findings

The findings of this paper indicate that how managers achieve a purposeful use of PI is related to their approach toward how to use the specific PI at hand, and two basic approaches are analytically separated: a rule-based approach and a reflective approach. Consequently, whether or not the right thing is being measured also becomes a question of how the PI is actually being interpreted and used. Thus, the extensive focus on what to measure and how to measure it becomes edgeless unless equal attention is given to how managers are able to use the PI to make knowledgeable decisions regarding what actions to take to achieve the desired changes.

Practical implications

Given the results, it comes with a managerial responsibility to make sure that all managers who are supposed to be engaged in using the PI are given roles in the self-assessments that are aligned with the level of knowledge they possess, or can access.

Originality/value

How managers purposefully use PI is a key to understand the potential impact of self-assessments.

Keywords
Competence, Self-assessment, Follow-up, Performance information, Interpretative perspective, Purposeful use
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Innovation and Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-46313 (URN)10.1108/IJQRM-09-2018-0243 (DOI)000490142800005 ()2-s2.0-85074296038 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-12-13 Created: 2019-12-13 Last updated: 2020-02-19Bibliographically approved
Reitsma, L., Hayley, H., Brunklaus, B., Nyström, S., Brikhan, W., Schaeffer, J., . . . Strøbech, E. (2019). Our burden - Carbondioxide theatre for climate action. In: NORDES 2019: WHO CARES?. Paper presented at No 8 (2019): NORDES 2019: WHO CARES?, ISSN 1604-9705. Espoo, Finland. www.nordes.org. Espoo, Finland, Article ID 150.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Our burden - Carbondioxide theatre for climate action
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2019 (English)In: NORDES 2019: WHO CARES?, Espoo, Finland, 2019, article id 150Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The biggest changes to the planet are made by humankind and action needs to be taken in order to guarantee a sustainable level of emissions for the planet (Rockström et al. 2009). In the project presented in this poster, we engage young citizens (from 15 to 20 years old), in critically reflecting on social norms and practices around climate goals and CO2 emissions, through participatory theatre methods. Only when those involved can get sufficient authority to determine and guide the research and the research agenda, can a project be truly participatory (Winschiers-Theophilus 2009). Participatory theatre offers ways to meet the longing for shared forums by engaging large groups of people in exploring difficult social dilemmas. It can potentially empower the young participants to change their own situations and organisations, as it is “likely to shake things into action or to “unfreeze” blocked situations ” (Shreyögg and Höpfl 2004).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Espoo, Finland: , 2019
Series
NORDES 2019: WHO CARES?, ISSN 1604-9705 ; No 8 (2019
National Category
Design Performing Art Studies Environmental Sciences Climate Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-50180 (URN)
Conference
No 8 (2019): NORDES 2019: WHO CARES?, ISSN 1604-9705. Espoo, Finland. www.nordes.org
Projects
Carbon Theatre
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2020-09-15 Created: 2020-09-15 Last updated: 2020-11-16Bibliographically approved
Gottlieb, L., Andersson Schaeffer, J. & Eriksson, Y. (2018). Co-production Teatime. In: : . Paper presented at DRS2018, University of Limerick 25th-28th June 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Co-production Teatime
2018 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-51270 (URN)
Conference
DRS2018, University of Limerick 25th-28th June 2018
Available from: 2020-10-07 Created: 2020-10-07 Last updated: 2021-01-07Bibliographically approved
Lindberg, M., Schaeffer, J. & Heikkilä, M. (2018). Socially Innovative Remodelling Of Preschool Facilities. European Public & Social Innovation Review (EPSIR), 3(2), 1-13
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Socially Innovative Remodelling Of Preschool Facilities
2018 (English)In: European Public & Social Innovation Review (EPSIR), ISSN 2529-9824, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite the prominent role of norms and values in public education policy and practice social innovation studies have rarely investigated how these are converted into practical transformations in the educational sector. The study therefore aims to provide further insight into the impact of contextualized and materialized norms and values in educational social innovation, using a remodeling process of preschool facilities in a Swedish municipality as an illustrating case study. Seeking to ensure equal and inclusive play, learning and development, the studied process exposes the impact of materialized norms and values on enabling and disabling rooms, furniture and materials in the preschool facilities. As such norms and values impact social transformation process regardless of the contextual specificities, the results may be useful also in other preschools in Sweden and internationally.

National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Industrial Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-50184 (URN)10.31637/epsir.18-2.1 (DOI)
Funder
Vinnova
Available from: 2020-09-15 Created: 2020-09-15 Last updated: 2020-11-16Bibliographically approved
Andersson Schaeffer, J., Bjelkemyr, M., Chirumalla, K. & Eriksson, Y. (2018). The emergence of socio-material assemblages in a university, company, and municipality collaboration. In: Proceedings of the European Conference on e-Learning, ECEL: . Paper presented at 17th European Conference on e-Learning, ECEL 2018, 1 November 2018 through 2 November 2018 (pp. 506-512). Academic Conferences Limited
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The emergence of socio-material assemblages in a university, company, and municipality collaboration
2018 (English)In: Proceedings of the European Conference on e-Learning, ECEL, Academic Conferences Limited , 2018, p. 506-512Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this paper we report on an attempt to let students, companies, and organisations themselves discover the kinds of technologies that could be useful when co-producing knowledge in a Master’s-level course in innovation and design. Traditionally, and for various good reasons such as security and stability, universities have had certain online tools and systems for collaboration, while companies and municipalities have had others. These systems support internal communication within organisations but do not necessarily enhance communication with external contacts. This use of different systems creates barriers to the iterative, recurring, convenient, non-hierarchical, and open online collaboration needed in an innovative design process involving multiple stakeholders. During a ten-week Master’s-level course in innovation and design in 2016 and 2017 the 38 students divided into five project groups established contact with five companies and organisations and could choose their own online tools in dialogue with them. This paper presents the students’ and organisations’ emerging practices during the process based on observations and reflective evaluations conducted during and after the course. The results are discussed in light of how socio-material assemblages formed in this special setting and how the results might be used to improve the teaching of online literacy in design collaboration. The result indicates that for co-production of knowledge in innovation and design projects, three new social media literacies would be useful: meta communication, peak performance, and design awareness.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academic Conferences Limited, 2018
Keywords
Blended learning, Design collaboration, Online literacy, Socio-material assemblages, Curricula, Hierarchical systems, Online systems, Students, Co-production of knowledge, Internal communications, On-line collaborations, Security and stability, E-learning
National Category
Media and Communications Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-41776 (URN)2-s2.0-85057951310 (Scopus ID)9781912764075 (ISBN)
Conference
17th European Conference on e-Learning, ECEL 2018, 1 November 2018 through 2 November 2018
Available from: 2018-12-20 Created: 2018-12-20 Last updated: 2022-11-25Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0012-7127

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