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Eshetu Birkie, S., Zemke Chavez, Z., Lindahl, E., Kurdve, M., Bruch, J., Bellgran, M., . . . Elvin, M. (2023). Systematic Green Design in Production Equipment Investments: Conceptual Development and Outlook. In: Alfnes, E., Romsdal, A., Strandhagen, J.O., von Cieminski, G., Romero, D (Ed.), Advances in Production Management Systems. Production Management Systems for Responsible Manufacturing, Service, and Logistics Futures: . Paper presented at IFIP International Conference on Advances in Production Management Systems, APMS 2023 (pp. 287-301). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Systematic Green Design in Production Equipment Investments: Conceptual Development and Outlook
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2023 (English)In: Advances in Production Management Systems. Production Management Systems for Responsible Manufacturing, Service, and Logistics Futures / [ed] Alfnes, E., Romsdal, A., Strandhagen, J.O., von Cieminski, G., Romero, D, Springer, 2023, p. 287-301Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This paper explores the concept of green design in the context of production, focusing on investment projects for production equipment design and acquisition by a manufacturing firm. Research towards making manufacturing and production related activities more sustainable is increasing. In the manufacturing sector, environmental sustainability tends to be more commonly approached from the operations perspective. However, the decisions taken in the design phase of the production equipment significantly impact the operations phase. Therefore, proactive design approaches for sustainability applied in product design settings could be transferred to the design of the production equipment to build in green aspects from the outset. This study explores the research questions of what green production equipment design entails and how the concept of green design has evolved in the context of production. Overall, this conceptual paper highlights the importance of incorporating green design principles from the outset of the production design. Transferable methodological issues are also explored for further detailed investigation in the production equipment design context. Strong collaboration between equipment suppliers and the buying manufacturer that aims to integrate sustainability as part of requirements is proposed as an enabler for the way forward. The paper also provides insights into the evolution of the concept in this context for possible future research. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
Series
IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology ; 692
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-64576 (URN)10.1007/978-3-031-43688-8_13 (DOI)2-s2.0-85174435182 (Scopus ID)978-3-031-43687-1 (ISBN)978-3-031-43688-8 (ISBN)
Conference
IFIP International Conference on Advances in Production Management Systems, APMS 2023
Available from: 2023-10-24 Created: 2023-10-24 Last updated: 2023-10-26Bibliographically approved
Berglund, R., Backström, T. & Bellgran, M. (2020). Critical Psychosocial Risk Treatment for Engineers and Technicians. Paper presented at ICRAM 2019 ICRAM, 06 Aug 2019, Amsterdam, Netherlands. International Journal of Economics and Management Engineering, 14(5), 362-375
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Critical Psychosocial Risk Treatment for Engineers and Technicians
2020 (English)In: International Journal of Economics and Management Engineering, ISSN 2225-742X, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 362-375Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study explores how management addresses psychosocial risks in seven teams of engineers and technicians in the midst of the fourth industrial revolution. The sample is from an ongoing quasi-experiment about psychosocial risk management in a manufacturing company in Sweden. Each of the seven teams belongs to one of two clusters: a positive cluster or a negative cluster. The positive cluster reports a significantly positive change in psychosocial risk levels between two time-points and the negative cluster reports a significantly negative change. The data are collected using semi-structured interviews. The results of the computer aided thematic analysis show that there are more differences than similarities when comparing the risk treatment actions taken between the two clusters. Findings show that the managers in the positive cluster use more enabling actions that foster and support formal and informal relationship building. In contrast, managers that use less enabling actions hinder the development of positive group processes and contribute negative changes in psychosocial risk levels. This exploratory study sheds some light on how management can influence significant positive and negative changes in psychosocial risk levels during a risk management process.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam, Netherlands: , 2020
National Category
Work Sciences Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-45065 (URN)
Conference
ICRAM 2019 ICRAM, 06 Aug 2019, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Projects
Can team coaching influence psychosocial safety climate for increased health and efficiency?
Available from: 2019-08-22 Created: 2019-08-22 Last updated: 2022-08-26Bibliographically approved
Berglund, R., Backström, T., Bellgran, M. & Hultgren, U. (2019). Evaluation of Psychosocial Risk Assessment Interventionon Psychosocial Safety Climate and Work Factors. In: FIFTH WORLD CONGRESS ON RISK, SETAC Africa 9th Biennial Conference, Cape Town International Convention Centre Cape Town, 2019, Abstract Book: . Paper presented at FIFTH WORLD CONGRESS ON RISK, SETAC Africa 9th Biennial Conference, Cape Town International Convention Centre Cape Town, South Africa, May 6-8, 2019 (pp. 12-12).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of Psychosocial Risk Assessment Interventionon Psychosocial Safety Climate and Work Factors
2019 (English)In: FIFTH WORLD CONGRESS ON RISK, SETAC Africa 9th Biennial Conference, Cape Town International Convention Centre Cape Town, 2019, Abstract Book, 2019, p. 12-12Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Employee wellbeing and good mental health is essential for goodbusiness. One of the recommended practices to prevent harmand promote wellbeing at work is psychosocial risk management.Part of the psychosocial risk management process involves riskassessment and treatment. However, there is little research investigatingwhat actually happens to the psychosocial safety climate,work factors, wellbeing and performance during a psychosocialrisk assessment and treatment process. To contribute toresearch in this area, 11 managers have identified psychosocialrisks in their departments at two different time points with6 months apart. This has been done using the digital version ofthe Republic of Ireland – Management Standards Indicator Tool(ROI-MSIT). This tool measures; demands, control, peer support,manager support, relationships, roles and change on a 5 pointlikert scale. For the purposes of this study, the tool also measuresand provides the user with reports on Psychosocial Safety Climate(PSC), performance and wellbeing.

The participants in this study are a control group comprised of6 product development departments (engineers), and an interventiongroup; 5 product support departments (technicians). Alldepartments belong the same technology department in a largermanufacturing company in Sweden.

Following the first measurement, the intervention group receivedtraining in psychosocial risk assessment and team coaching. Linemanagers in the intervention group participated in four peercoachingsessions where they discussed challenges and potentialsolutions related to risk treatment. The control group received notraining or group sessions. 6 months later, the second measurementusing the ROI-MSIT was carried out.

Findings show 1) no significant differences between the controland intervention at T1. 2) at T2 the intervention group scoredsignificantly higher on PSC, manager support and relationships.3) There are no significant changes when comparing the controlgroups’ results between T1 to T2. 4) The intervention group showsignificant improvements in the work factors: role, demands,relationships, support from manager, change, psychosocialsafety climate and self-rated performance from T1 to T2.

The results suggest that training may have contributed toimprovements in PSC, work factors, wellbeing and performance.This is the first time to our knowledge that the ROI-MSIT and PSChave been used together.

More research is needed understand more about why psychosocialrisk levels improved. How were the risks addressed and didthe risk treatment contribute to the change.

National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-53772 (URN)
Conference
FIFTH WORLD CONGRESS ON RISK, SETAC Africa 9th Biennial Conference, Cape Town International Convention Centre Cape Town, South Africa, May 6-8, 2019
Available from: 2021-03-29 Created: 2021-03-29 Last updated: 2021-11-30Bibliographically approved
Javadi, S., Bruch, J. & Bellgran, M. (2016). Characteristics of product introduction process in low-volume manufacturing industries: A case study. Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, 27(4), 535-559
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characteristics of product introduction process in low-volume manufacturing industries: A case study
2016 (English)In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, ISSN 1741038X, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 535-559Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to understand how the characteristics of low-volume manufacturing industries influence the product introduction process and factors which can facilitate that process in low-volume manufacturing industries.

Design/methodology/approach: A literature review in combination with a multiple-case study were used to achieve the purpose of the paper. The multiple-case study was based on two product development projects in a low-volume manufacturing company.

Findings: The main identified characteristics of the product introduction process in low-volume manufacturing industries were a low number of prototypes, absence of conventional production ramp-up, reduced complexity of the process, failure to consider the manufacturability of the products due to an extensive focus on their functionality, and increased complexity of resource allocation. It was determined that knowledge and experiences from prior production of similar products could serve as a facilitator of the manufacturing process.

Research limitations/implications: The main limitation of this study is that the identified characteristics and facilitating factors are confined to the internal variables of the studied company. A study of the role of external variables during the product introduction process such as suppliers and customers could be the subject of future studies.

Practical implications: This research will provide practitioners in low-volume manufacturing industries with general insight about the characteristics of the product introduction process and the aspects that should be considered during the process.

Keywords
Product development; Production system development; Design-production interface; Low-volume products; industrialisation process
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Innovation and Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-27843 (URN)10.1108/JMTM-03-2015-0017 (DOI)000379664200004 ()2-s2.0-84971357127 (Scopus ID)
Projects
INNOFACTURE - innovative manufacturing development
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Available from: 2015-04-17 Created: 2015-04-17 Last updated: 2021-11-30Bibliographically approved
Bellgran, M. & Bruch, J. (2015). Environmental Management in Manufacturing Industries. In: Jinyue Yan (Ed.), Handbook of Clean Energy Systems: . John Wiley & Sons, Ltd
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Environmental Management in Manufacturing Industries
2015 (English)In: Handbook of Clean Energy Systems / [ed] Jinyue Yan, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd , 2015Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The environmental concern requires manufacturing industries to direct resources and effort toward strategies and activities that help reducing their overall environmental impact. Using environmental management systems (EMSs) such as ISO 14001 or similar is common. However, as the EMSs do not put absolute requirements on the organization's environmental performance, it is still up to each manufacturing company to set the ambition level. As part of the EMSs, the identification of the environmental aspects to be dealt with during the operations phase could be supported by an industrial applicable method called Green Performance Map (GPM), engaging the employees on all levels to work with those environmental improvements they could impact. While most manufacturing companies are implementing the concept of lean production, it is advantageous to integrate the environmental improvement work into the existing lean infrastructure with, for example, daily management systems and scheduled activities for continuous improvement. Another approach discussed in the article is the need for emphasizing the design of the production system as an upstream activity that has fundamental impact on the environmental performance downstream, that is, in the operations phase. When designing new production equipment or renovating existing equipment, the opportunities to incorporate more energy- and resource-efficient solutions are much greater and cheaper compared to investing in such solutions afterward during serial production. Arguably, a combined design and operations approach is necessary in order to achieve a complete green mindset that will guide the environmental actions on both the strategic, tactical, and operational levels. Managing the environmental tasks is part of the overall strive toward lean and clean energy systems in manufacturing industry.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, 2015
Keywords
manufacturing industry, environmental performance, design and operations of production systems, Green Performance Map, environmental management system, environmental improvements, lean and green, environmental KPIs, resource efficiency, energy efficiency
National Category
Engineering and Technology Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-30014 (URN)10.1002/9781118991978.hces092 (DOI)978-1-118-38858-7 (ISBN)
Projects
XPRESEQUIP: User-Supplier integration in production equipment design
Available from: 2015-12-20 Created: 2015-12-18 Last updated: 2018-01-26Bibliographically approved
Andersson, C. H. & Bellgran, M. (2015). On the complexity of using performance measures: Enhancing sustained production improvement capability by combining OEE and productivity. Journal of manufacturing systems, 35, 144-154
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On the complexity of using performance measures: Enhancing sustained production improvement capability by combining OEE and productivity
2015 (English)In: Journal of manufacturing systems, ISSN 0278-6125, E-ISSN 1878-6642, Vol. 35, p. 144-154Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The global speed of change within the manufacturing industry forces companies to constantly improve production performance. In that effort, performance measures are critical for driving and managing production improvements. Two of the most commonly used measures in operations are productivity and overall equipment efficiency (OEE). However, the potential of using these measures as improvement drivers is not fully utilized in industry today due, for example, to ambiguities in definitions and their interpretation. A study of available theory indicates a gap between these implications from a theoretical perspective vs. the industrial perspective. Bridging this theory-practice gap implies great potential for competitiveness and growth in manufacturing, since the latent production capacity that could be utilized is tremendous. Even if a high degree of complexity in definition and calculation when applied in operational conditions might be perceived, this paper will show that a systematically used combined set of OEE and productivity measures can successfully drive production improvements. Also, two new productivity measures for driving improvements at the shop floor level are proposed. The empirical findings are based on a two-year case study within a manufacturing company in the automotive industry using an interactive research approach. 

Keywords
Improvements, OEE, Performance measures, Production capability, Productivity, Automotive industry, Industrial research, Manufacture, Manufacturing companies, Manufacturing industries, Overall equipment efficiency, Performance measure, Production capabilities, Production performance
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-27978 (URN)10.1016/j.jmsy.2014.12.003 (DOI)000354591100011 ()2-s2.0-84928722532 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-05-15 Created: 2015-05-15 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Javadi, S., Bruch, J. & Bellgran, M. (2015). Product development in low-volume manufacturing industries: Characteristics and influencing factors. In: DS 80-4 PROCEEDINGS OF THE 20TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENGINEERING DESIGN (ICED 15) VOL 4: DESIGN FOR X, DESIGN TO X: . Paper presented at International Conference on Engineering Design 2015 ICED15, 27-30 Jul 2015, Milan, Italy (pp. 145-154).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Product development in low-volume manufacturing industries: Characteristics and influencing factors
2015 (English)In: DS 80-4 PROCEEDINGS OF THE 20TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENGINEERING DESIGN (ICED 15) VOL 4: DESIGN FOR X, DESIGN TO X, 2015, p. 145-154Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Product development process has a considerable effect on factors such as time to market and quality of product which are vital for manufacturing companies to remain competitive. Therefore, study of the factors which influence the product development process such as characteristics of products and production systems is necessary to support and improve the product development process. Since most of the studies have been conducted in the context of high-volume manufacturing industries, the influences of characteristics of low-volume products and production systems on the product development process in such industries have not been considered sufficiently. In this paper, characteristics of low-volume products and production systems, their inter-relations and their influences on the product development process have been studied through a multiple case study. A general map of characteristics of low-volume products and production systems and their inter-relations was presented in this paper. Moreover, the influences of these characteristics on product development process including the reduced complexity of the process and lack of opportunities for test and refinement were discussed.

Keywords
ew product development; product introduction; low-volume; production preparation
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Innovation and Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-27844 (URN)000366982900015 ()2-s2.0-84979696872 (Scopus ID)
Conference
International Conference on Engineering Design 2015 ICED15, 27-30 Jul 2015, Milan, Italy
Projects
INNOFACTURE - innovative manufacturing development
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Available from: 2015-04-17 Created: 2015-04-17 Last updated: 2020-10-20Bibliographically approved
Bellgran, M. (2014). A corporate perspective on global management and development of lean production systems: A case study. In: Handbook of Research on Design and Management of Lean Production Systems: (pp. 270-289). IGI Global
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A corporate perspective on global management and development of lean production systems: A case study
2014 (English)In: Handbook of Research on Design and Management of Lean Production Systems, IGI Global, 2014, p. 270-289Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The challenge for every multinational manufacturing company with the ambition to implement the lean production concept is how to implement it worldwide within its global manufacturing footprint. There are many decisions that need to be taken from a company group perspective when planning and implementing a lean program. These concern the level of standardization on principles and tools, how to structure and organize additional resources, how to share experiences within the organization, and how to sustain the effort. These factors are elaborated in this chapter from a factory perspective based on the presentation of the lean journey of Gyproc AB, a process industry company within the Gypsum part of the large Saint Gobain group. The company has worked for about ten years with implementing world-class manufacturing and has extensive experience of the issues of starting-up and sustaining the lean-based concept. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IGI Global, 2014
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-31105 (URN)10.4018/978-1-4666-5039-8.ch013 (DOI)2-s2.0-84956729890 (Scopus ID)9781466650404 (ISBN)1466650397 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-02-18 Created: 2016-02-18 Last updated: 2016-02-18Bibliographically approved
Bruch, J., Bellgran, M. & Bennett, D. (2014). COLLABORATIVE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESSFUL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS. In: International Conference of the International Association for Management of Technology IAMOT, Proceedings: . Paper presented at IAMOT 2014. 23rd INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE FOR THE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF MANAGEMENT OF TECHNOLOGY May 22-26, 2014. Washington, United States
Open this publication in new window or tab >>COLLABORATIVE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESSFUL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS
2014 (English)In: International Conference of the International Association for Management of Technology IAMOT, Proceedings, Washington, United States, 2014Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Collaborative development between the user and the equipment supplier of production technology has an increasingly important effect in terms of generating innovative, sustainable, and unique production process ideas that can be easily ramped-up to high volume production. However, joint development of production technology is challenging and has received surprisingly limited attention. Against this background the objective of the paper is to explore collaborative challenges from the equipment suppliers and customers’ perspectives in production technology development projects, and to suggest strategies for how these challenges can be addressed. Empirically the results are based on multiple case studies from two manufacturing companies in Sweden (i.e. users) and two equipment suppliers, ensuring that the perspectives of both the user and supplier sides in production technology development projects are considered. Our findings show that the identified collaboration challenges do not only relate to inter-organizational development activities but also to the companies’ internal characteristics, i.e. the prerequisites for company collaboration. Internal characteristics have a clear impact on the ability to bridge the interface with the equipment supplier and thus to advance the collaboration in production technology development projects. Our findings underscore the importance of having intra and inter-organizational strategies to enhance the success related to collaboration in production technology development projects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Washington, United States: , 2014
Keywords
Production equipment design, inter-organizational collaboration, joint development, buyer-supplier integration, process development, manufacturing industry
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-27219 (URN)0-9815817-7-3 (ISBN)
Conference
IAMOT 2014. 23rd INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE FOR THE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF MANAGEMENT OF TECHNOLOGY May 22-26, 2014
Projects
EQUIP: User-Supplier integration in production equipment design
Available from: 2014-12-29 Created: 2014-12-29 Last updated: 2014-12-29Bibliographically approved
Sjögren, P., Bellgran, M. & Fagerström, B. (2014). ENGINEERING CHANGE MANAGEMENT IN ENGINEERING-TO-ORDER PROJECTS FROM A MANUFACTURING PERSPECTIVE. In: 6th Swedish Production Symposium SPS'14: . Paper presented at 6th Swedish Production Symposium SPS'14, 16-18 Sep 2014, Göteborg, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>ENGINEERING CHANGE MANAGEMENT IN ENGINEERING-TO-ORDER PROJECTS FROM A MANUFACTURING PERSPECTIVE
2014 (English)In: 6th Swedish Production Symposium SPS'14, 2014Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this research was to investigate the engineering change management process in engineering-to-order projects while comparing the same process in traditional manufacturing. A single-case study at a engineering-to-order – engineering review office was performed and results were analysed in conjuction with literature covering the engineering change process in traditional manufacturing. Engineering-to-order projects and tradional manufacturing are different in many ways but share the need for a reliant engineering change process. This study found that engineering change management post-change analysis could benefit future projects in the form of quantifiable lessons learned from previous project’s engineering change data.

Keywords
Engineering Change Management, Engineering-to-Order and Process Management.
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-26794 (URN)
Conference
6th Swedish Production Symposium SPS'14, 16-18 Sep 2014, Göteborg, Sweden
Projects
INNOFACTURE - innovative manufacturing development
Available from: 2014-12-03 Created: 2014-12-02 Last updated: 2020-10-22Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0662-539X

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