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Welander, J., Wallin, J. & Isaksson, K. (2017). Job Resources to Promote Feelings of Pride in the Organization: The Role of Social Identification. Scandinavian Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology (1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Job Resources to Promote Feelings of Pride in the Organization: The Role of Social Identification
2017 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, ISSN 2002-2867, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Employees are assumed to obtain job resources from and identify with the organization they work for. Previously, the concepts of job resources and social identification have mostly been studied holistically, that is, on one general organizational level. This study contributes to the understanding of how job resources, operationalized at two different levels in two organizations, influence the amount of group-based pride that employees feel for their workgroups and for their organizations. Social identification is purported to intervene in this relationship on respective level, and its inclusion is expected to contribute to different kinds of pride. Regression analyses of questionnaire data gathered from 436 employees in two middle-sized municipalities in Sweden revealed that: (1) a workgroup’s resources and identification explained additional variance in workgroup pride beyond the effects of resources and identification at the organizational level, (2) leader and organizational resources and identification explained additional variance in organizational pride beyond that of workgroup resources and identification, and (3) social identification in both these areas partially mediated these relationships. Theoretical contributions include the addition of emotional outcomes of job resources and that these effects are foci-specific. This emphasizes the need to distinguish between workgroup and organizational levels regarding both independent and dependent variables. The clarification of the multiple identifications and group-based pride dynamics that exist has practical implications for Human Resource (HR) managers.

Keywords
job resources, social identification, dual identification, group-based emotions, pride
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Working Life Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-35281 (URN)10.16993/sjwop.23 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-05-03 Created: 2017-05-03 Last updated: 2018-12-17Bibliographically approved
Svindseth, M., Sørebø, Ø., Nøttestad, J. A., Roaldset, J. O., Wallin, J. & Dahl, A. A. (2009). Psychometric examination and normative data for the Narcissistic Personality Inventory 29 item version: Personality and Social Sciences. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 50(2), 151-159
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychometric examination and normative data for the Narcissistic Personality Inventory 29 item version: Personality and Social Sciences
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2009 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 151-159Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI) is commonly used in empirical studies of narcissism. Few population-based studies have been published. Our aim was to do a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) of the NPI 29 item version with a four-factor structure, in two population-based samples and in a patient sample, and present normative population-based data. The NPI-29 was filled in by 324 respondents from the Norwegian population, 231 from the Swedish population and 167 Norwegian psychiatric patients. The four-factor structure of the NPI-29 with Leadership/Power, Exhibitionism/Self-admiration, Superiority/Arrogance and Uniqueness/Entitlement was reproduced in these samples. The CFA models showed good fit indices in all samples. Mean scores on the NPI-29 and four subscales hardly differed between the samples. For the NPI-29 total score and factors, few significant differences were observed. CFA of the samples supported the factor structure of the NPI-29 formerly identified by principal component analysis of the Swedish population sample.

Keywords
NPI; structural equation modelling; narcissism; population sample; acute psychiatry
National Category
Psychiatry Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-22377 (URN)10.1111/j.1467-9450.2008.00686.x (DOI)000263708200007 ()2-s2.0-60949103091 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-11-06 Created: 2013-11-06 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Svindseth, M. F., Nøttestad, J. A., Wallin, J., Roaldset, J. O. & Dahl, A. A. (2008). Narcissism in patience admitted to psychiatric acute wards: its relation to violence, suicidality and other psychopathology. BMC Psychiatry, 8(13)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Narcissism in patience admitted to psychiatric acute wards: its relation to violence, suicidality and other psychopathology
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2008 (English)In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 8, no 13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

The objective was to examine various aspects of narcissism in patients admitted to acute psychiatric wards and to compare their level of narcissism to that of an age- and gender-matched sample from the general population (NORM).

Methods

This cross-sectional study interviewed 186 eligible acute psychiatric patients with the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) and the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF). The patients filled in the Narcissistic Personality Inventory-21 item version (NPI-21), The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. High and low narcissism was defined by the median of the total NPI-21 score. An age- and gender-matched control sample from the general population also scored the NPI-21 (NORM).

Results

Being male, involuntary admitted, having diagnosis of schizophrenia, higher self-esteem, and severe violence were significantly associated with high narcissism, and so were also low levels of suicidality, depression, anxiety and GAF scores. Severe violence and high self-esteem were significantly associated with high narcissism in multivariable analyses. The NPI-21 and its subscales showed test-retest correlations ≥0.83, while the BPRS and the HADS showed lower correlations, confirming the trait character of the NPI-21. Depression and suicidality were negatively associated with the NPI-21 total score and all its subscales, while positive association was observed with grandiosity. No significant differences were observed between patients and NORM on the NPI-21 total score or any of the NPI subscales.

Conclusion

Narcissism in the psychiatric patients was significantly associated with violence, suicidality and other symptoms relevant for management and treatment planning. Due to its trait character, use of the NPI-21 in acute psychiatric patients can give important clinical information. The similar level of narcissism found in patients and NORM is in need of further examination.

Keywords
narcissism, NPI, violence, suicidality
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-6193 (URN)10.1186/1471-244X-8-13 (DOI)000253963600001 ()18304339 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-40949087698 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2009-06-12 Created: 2009-06-12 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Kansi, J., Wichstrøm, L. & Bergman, L. R. (2005). Eating problems and their risk factors: A 7-year longitudinal study of a population sample of Norwegian adolescent girls. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 34(6), 521-531
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Eating problems and their risk factors: A 7-year longitudinal study of a population sample of Norwegian adolescent girls
2005 (English)In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 521-531Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The longitudinal stability of eating problems and their relationships to risk factors were investigated in a representative population sample of 623 Norwegian girls aged 13–14 followed over 7 years (3 time points). Three eating problem symptoms were measured: Restriction, Bulimia-food preoccupation, and Diet, all taken from the12-item Eating Attitudes Test. The aim of the study was to investigate the stability of these eating problem symptoms both as separate components (as opposed to total symptom load) as well as from a syndrome perspective. Over 7 years, dieting behavior showed the highest correlational stability (0.32). Regarding stable eating problem syndromes, at all 3 time points, 1 group of girls with generalized eating problems was found, characterized by simultaneously pronounced bulimic tendencies and dieting. However, we did not establish individual stability across 7 years for this syndrome group. Through development, eating problem symptoms were associated with characteristic risk factors. Similarities and differences between findings regarding eating problems and eating disorders are discussed.

Keywords
eating problems; adolescents; girls; longitudinal; risk factors
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-22379 (URN)10.1007/s10964-005-8935-3 (DOI)000234318800002 ()2-s2.0-29644443523 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-11-06 Created: 2013-11-06 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Kansi, J., Wichstrøm, L. & Bergman, L. R. (2003). Eating Problems and the Self-Concept: Results Based on a Representative Sample of Norwegian Adolescent Girls. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 32(5), 325-335
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Eating Problems and the Self-Concept: Results Based on a Representative Sample of Norwegian Adolescent Girls
2003 (English)In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 325-335Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The joint role of self-esteem and unstable self-perceptions for eating problems was investigated in a representative Norwegian population sample of girls in 3 age groups (N = 5287; aged 12-19 years). Three scales from the 12-item Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-12) measured eating problems: Restriction, Bulimia-food preoccupation, and Diet. Girls low on all EAT scales were most often characterized by high self-esteem combined with stable self-perceptions, whereas girls high on all EAT-scales were characterized by having low self-esteem and unstable self-perceptions. Bulimic tendencies and dieting were more common in older groups, whereas high scores on all EAT-scales simultaneously were equally common in all ages. The findings gave initial support to the continuity hypothesis in indicating that the age trends for eating problems, except for restrictive tendencies, followed those of eating disorders and in that the risk factors found for eating problems parallel those reported for eating disorders.

Keywords
eating problems, adolescents, self-concept, girls, self-esteem, unstable self-perceptions
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-22375 (URN)10.1023/A:1024917930602 (DOI)2-s2.0-0042208456 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-11-06 Created: 2013-11-06 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Kansi, J. (2003). The Narcissistic Personality Inventory: Applicability in a Swedish population sample. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 44(5), 441-448
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Narcissistic Personality Inventory: Applicability in a Swedish population sample
2003 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 44, no 5, p. 441-448Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A Swedish translation of the 40-item Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI) was mailed to 410 participants, aged 21–61 years, randomly sampled from the Swedish general population. The participation rate was 62%. The applicability of a previously published seven-factor structure (Raskin & Terry) and a four-factor structure (Emmons) was investigated. The factor structure found in the present in the Swedish sample corresponded better with Emmons's version. Therefore the four-factor structure was chosen. Because the correspondence to Emmons's factor structure was not perfect, a revised NPI for Swedish use was constructed. The total scale score is usually used, although the Swedish NPI includes four subscales: Leadership/Power, Exhibitionism/Self-admiration, Superiority/Arrogance, and Uniqueness/Entitlement. For the total scale, the internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) was 0.80 and the test–retest correlation was 0.93. The total scale score correlated with self-esteem as well as the interpersonal style and emotional aspects of psychopathy, supporting the validity of the scale.

Keywords
Narcissism, NPI, factor analysis
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-6198 (URN)10.1046/j.1467-9450.2003.00365.x (DOI)15030110 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-0346957010 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2009-06-15 Created: 2009-06-12 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3090-8437

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