mdh.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 26) Show all publications
Sriyasak, A., Almqvist, A.-L., Sridawruang, C. & Häggström-Nordin, E. (2019). Healthcare providers' caring for Thai teenage parents: A focus group study. Midwifery, 69, 172-178
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Healthcare providers' caring for Thai teenage parents: A focus group study
2019 (English)In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 69, p. 172-178Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2019
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-42302 (URN)10.1016/j.midw.2018.09.010 (DOI)000454129800023 ()30279021 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054059229 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-10 Created: 2019-01-10 Last updated: 2019-01-24Bibliographically approved
Appelgren Engstrom, H., Häggström-Nordin, E., Borneskog-Sinclair, C. & Almqvist, A.-L. (2018). Mothers in Same-Sex Relationships Describe the Process of Forming a Family as a Stressful Journey in a Heteronormative World: A Swedish Grounded Theory Study.. Maternal and Child Health Journal, 22(10), 1444-1450
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mothers in Same-Sex Relationships Describe the Process of Forming a Family as a Stressful Journey in a Heteronormative World: A Swedish Grounded Theory Study.
2018 (English)In: Maternal and Child Health Journal, ISSN 1092-7875, E-ISSN 1573-6628, Vol. 22, no 10, p. 1444-1450Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives The aim of this study was to gain insight into how women in same-sex relationships experience the process of forming a family through the use of assisted reproduction technique (ART), from planning the pregnancy to parenthood, and their experience of parental support from healthcare professionals. Methods The participants were 20 women in a same-sex relationship who had conceived through ART at a Swedish clinic. Semi-structured interviews including open questions about pregnancy, parenthood and support from healthcare professionals were conducted. The interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. The data were analysed according to grounded theory. Results The core category, A stressful journey through a heteronormative world, emerged from the analysis, as did three subcategories: A journey fraught with difficulties and decisions; The nuclear family as the norm; and A need for psychological support. Same-sex parents expressed a need for more information about how to access ART in Sweden. Both the healthcare organization and treatment were perceived as heteronormative. In particular, these women lacked psychological support during the demanding process of utilizing a sperm donor to conceive. Conclusions for Practice Professionals in antenatal care should undergo mandatory cultural competency training to ensure cultural sensitivity and the provision of updated information, tailored brochures and early parental support for families with same-sex parents. All parents need guidance and support from competent, caring personnel throughout the entire process of forming a family.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Antenatal care; Assisted reproduction technique; Parental support; Women in same-sex relationships
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Care Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-41143 (URN)10.1007/s10995-018-2525-y (DOI)000445198600010 ()29740747 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85046650947 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Doktorandprojekt: Families with two mothers-experiences and support from health care providers
Available from: 2018-10-08 Created: 2018-10-08 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved
Sreyasak, A., Almqvist, A.-L., Sridawruang, C. & Häggström-Nordin, E. (2018). Parents’ experiences of their teenage children’s parenthood: An interview study. Nursing and Health Sciences, 20(1), 39-45
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parents’ experiences of their teenage children’s parenthood: An interview study
2018 (English)In: Nursing and Health Sciences, ISSN 1441-0745, E-ISSN 1442-2018, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 39-45Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, we described and analyzed parents’ experiences of teenage parenthood and the provision of support to their teenage children who had recently have become parents. A quali- tative method was used. In-depth interviews with 24 participants were conducted, all parents of teenage parents. Data were analyzed using content analysis; four themes and 11 subthemes were identified. The results show that parents’ norms and values were strongly influenced by their religious beliefs. The participants had mixed emotions and reactions to their teenage chil- dren’s parenthood. Also participants were sources of support to the teenage parents and assisted them in their transition to parenthood. However, the participants also expressed the importance that their teenage children continue their education and avoid repeated pregnan- cies. This study highlights how emotional, instrumental, and informational support provided by parents to their teenagers can assist the latter in their transition to parenthood. In their work with teenage parents, healthcare providers can benefit from teenage parent's own parents involvement and experiences. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
experience, in-depth interview, parent, support, teenage parenthood, Thailand
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Care Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-38353 (URN)10.1111/nhs.12378 (DOI)000426650900006 ()29094449 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85042934709 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Becoming a Thai teenage parent
Available from: 2018-01-25 Created: 2018-01-25 Last updated: 2018-10-16Bibliographically approved
Almqvist, A.-L. & Lassinantti, K. (2018). Social Work Practices for Young People with Complex Needs: An Integrative Review. Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal, 35(3), 207-219
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social Work Practices for Young People with Complex Needs: An Integrative Review
2018 (English)In: Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal, ISSN 0738-0151, E-ISSN 1573-2797, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 207-219Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this integrative review is to investigate research of social work practices for adolescents and young adults with complex needs. The research questions are: What are the major themes in studies of practices for young people with complex needs? How do studies suggest that complex needs can be met in ways that are beneficial for young people? A young person with complex needs is in this review defined as an adolescent or young adult who, due to mental ill-health in combination with different types of social vulnerabilities, is receiving assistance from multiple welfare services. Searches were conducted in seven databases. These searches resulted in a sample of 1677 records, published 2007-2016, which in the screening process were reduced to 24 publications, all peer-reviewed articles. The participants in the studies in the articles consisted of young people, parents and professionals from mainly Anglo-Saxon countries. The articles were analyzed with qualitative summative content analysis. Three empirically generated themes were found in studies of work practices targeting young people with complex needs: collaboration-, relationship- and empowerment-oriented practices. In conclusion, the practices contain a wide variety of features, but with the joint aim of acknowledging young people's needs. The results can be used by practitioners and policymakers to further the development of services for youth with mental ill-health and social vulnerabilities, who use multiple welfare services.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER, 2018
Keywords
Complex needs, Empowerment, Integrative review, Relationship, Social work practices, Young people
National Category
Health Sciences Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-41009 (URN)10.1007/s10560-017-0522-4 (DOI)000444094900001 ()2-s2.0-85038127731 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-27 Created: 2018-09-27 Last updated: 2019-01-04Bibliographically approved
Sriyasak, A., Almqvist, A.-L., Sridawruang, C., Neamsakul, W. & Häggström-Nordin, E. (2018). The New Generation of Thai Fathers: Breadwinners involved in Parenting. American Journal of Men's Health (5), 1368-1378
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The New Generation of Thai Fathers: Breadwinners involved in Parenting
Show others...
2018 (English)In: American Journal of Men's Health, ISSN 1557-9883, E-ISSN 1557-9891, no 5, p. 1368-1378Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Becoming a father for the first time might cause great changes in a man’s identity and lifestyle. Teenage fathers must strive to balance two competing roles: the teenage role and the father role. The current study design followed grounded theory methodology to gain a deeper understanding of how Thai teenage fathers reason about becoming and being a father from a gender equality perspective. Participants were selected from a heterogeneous group of fathers until saturation was reached (n = 25). Most of the fathers were cohabiting with their partner in an extended family. An interview guide was developed, a pilot study was undertaken, and interviews were performed on two different occasions: once during the second trimester of pregnancy and again when the baby was 5 to 6 months old. The core category, “Male breadwinners involved in parenting,” encompassed persons making the transition from being solely a teenager to being a teenage father. Most of the fathers accepted the unintended pregnancy and took on the expected breadwinning responsibility of a father. They prepared for fatherhood and changed their lifestyle. Their families provided support. Nevertheless, the fathers sought to avoid further unplanned parenthood by learning about family planning. The teenage fathers emphasized breadwinning first, then involved himself in the child and the housework. These findings provide an increased understanding of Thai teenage fathers.

Keywords
fatherhood; grounded theory; teenage fathers; Thailand
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Care Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-31707 (URN)10.1177/1557988316651062 (DOI)000441714200017 ()27215945 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85047889874 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-06-03 Created: 2016-06-03 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved
Almqvist, A.-L. & Lassinantti, K. (2018). Young people with complex needs meet complex organizations: an interview study with Swedish professionals about sustainable work practices. Community, Work and Family, 21(5), 620-635
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Young people with complex needs meet complex organizations: an interview study with Swedish professionals about sustainable work practices
2018 (English)In: Community, Work and Family, ISSN 1366-8803, E-ISSN 1469-3615, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 620-635Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper concerns preconditions for the well-being of young people with mental ill-health combined with social vulnerabilities, also referred to as youth with complex needs. Research questions are: What barriers to sustainable work practices for young people labelled as having complex needs do professionals encounter? What do professionals identify as possible ways to overcome these barriers? Sustainable work practices are reflected in three themes: empowerment, relationships and collaboration. The findings are based on semi-structured interviews with 24 professionals, 3 men and 21 women, working in psychiatric care and the social services in two Swedish municipalities in 2016 and 2017. Major barriers are lack of continuity and co-ordination in staff and support, and fragmentation of work practices. As a consequence of the increased specialization of human service organizations, young people have to interact with many different professionals which could cause disparate interventions. Possible ways mentioned to overcome these barriers are supported through good interactional skills, using keyworkers as well therapeutic alliances, wrap-around services and case management. Complexity is linked to organizations and work practices rather than to young people. An often dysfunctional service delivery system in organizations with rigid boundaries may also affect professionals’ aim for sustainable support.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-41508 (URN)10.1080/13668803.2018.1527758 (DOI)000456793800008 ()2-s2.0-85057184252 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-12-06 Created: 2018-12-06 Last updated: 2019-02-07Bibliographically approved
Kaufman, G. & Almqvist, A.-L. (2017). The Role of Partners and Workplaces in British and Swedish Men’s Parental Leave Decisions. Men and Masculinities, 20(5), 533-551
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Role of Partners and Workplaces in British and Swedish Men’s Parental Leave Decisions
2017 (English)In: Men and Masculinities, ISSN 1097-184X, E-ISSN 1552-6828, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 533-551Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sweden has been long known for its early introduction of parental leave in the 1970s and the introduction of the first nontransferable “daddy month” in 1995 while the United Kingdom (UK) lagged behind with policies that reflected a strong male breadwinner model until the recent introduction of Additional Paternity Leave, which extended paternity leave up to twenty-six weeks. Our study examines parental leave decisions following the changes in policy, paying particular attention to the role of partners and workplaces. We draw on data from thirty-two interviews with Swedish parents conducted in 2008 and twenty-two interviews with British parents conducted in 2012. We find that mothers in both countries have great influence over parental leave decisions. However, this often perpetuates a much greater gendered division of parental leave in the UK than in Sweden. Furthermore, the British workplace continues to hold very different expectations for male and female employees regarding parental leave, while Swedish employers are generally accepting of men’s use of long parental leave. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE Publications Inc., 2017
National Category
Social Work Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-37303 (URN)10.1177/1097184X17727570 (DOI)000414903100002 ()2-s2.0-85033440082 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-11-23 Created: 2017-11-23 Last updated: 2017-11-23Bibliographically approved
Sriyasak, A., Almqvist, A.-L., Sridawruang, C., Neumsakul, W. & Häggström-Nordin, E. (2016). Struggling with motherhood and coping with fatherhood: A grounded theory study among Thai teenagers. Midwifery, 42, 1-9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Struggling with motherhood and coping with fatherhood: A grounded theory study among Thai teenagers
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, ISSN 0266-6138, Vol. 42, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective to gain a deeper understanding of Thai teenage parents’ perspectives, experiences and reasoning about becoming and being a teenage parent from a gender perspective. Design an exploratory design using grounded theory methodology. Semi-structured interviews were used to collect data. An interview guide was developed, a pilot study was undertaken, and interviews were performed on two different occasions: once during the second trimester of pregnancy and again when the infant was 5–6 months old. Setting a province in the western part of Thailand. Participants the selection of a heterogeneous group of teenage parents-to-be continued until saturation was reached, as describe by Glaser and Strauss (1967), in all n=50. Inclusion criteria for participants were that they were heterosexual couples, under 20 years of age, cohabiting, and expecting their first child. Findings the core category ‘struggling with motherhood and coping with fatherhood’ comprises descriptions of the process from when the teenagers first learned about the pregnancy until the child was six months old. The teenagers had failed to use contraceptives which led to an unintended parenthood. Their parenthood became a turning point as the teenagers started to change their behaviours and lifestyle during pregnancy, and adapted their relationships to partner and family. Family commitments was a facilitator, through support given by their families. Finally, becoming a parent describes ways of dealing with the parental role, by engaging in parental activities and reestablishing goals in life. Most of the teenage parents reproduced traditional gender roles by being a caring mother or a breadwinning father respectively. Key conclusions ‘struggling with motherhood and coping with fatherhood’ referred to the parents’ stories about how they struggled and coped with life changes and their parental role when they became unintentionally pregnant, accepted their parenting, and finally became parents. After becoming parents, the main concerns of most of the teenage parents were being a caring mother and a breadwinning father. Implications for practice this study contributes a deeper understanding of Thai teenage parents’ experiences of becoming and being a parent and might improve health care professionals’ adaptation of care for teentranatanage parents and inspire them to tailor their care specifically to teenager's needs from early pregnancy to parenthood.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Coping with fatherhood, grounded theory, struggling with motherhood, teen parent, thai teenagers
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Health Sciences
Research subject
Care Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-33326 (URN)10.1016/j.midw.2016.09.005 (DOI)000390548000001 ()27662224 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84988354946 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Becoming a Thai teenage parent
Available from: 2016-10-03 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2018-10-16Bibliographically approved
Almqvist, A.-L. & Kaufman, G. (2016). What  Work-Family Conflicts Do Fathers Experience in Sweden and in the United States? (1ed.). In: Isabella Crespi, Elisabetta Ruspini (Ed.), Balancing Work and Family in a Changing Society: The Fathers' Perspective (pp. 176-189). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What  Work-Family Conflicts Do Fathers Experience in Sweden and in the United States?
2016 (English)In: Balancing Work and Family in a Changing Society: The Fathers' Perspective / [ed] Isabella Crespi, Elisabetta Ruspini, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016, 1, p. 176-189Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter investigated Swedish and US fathers’ experiences of work-family conflict, possible solutions, and actual changes to their work situation in relation to becoming a parent. The Swedish data were drawn from interviews completed in 2008 with 16 fathers with a child born in 2005 or 2006. The US data came from interviews conducted between 2005 and 2007 with 26 fathers with at least one child age five or younger. The Swedish semi-structured interviews were analyzed according to grounded theory. In terms of conflicts, half of the Swedish fathers mention time pressures or stress, with some referring to work-life balance as a puzzle. Findings indicate that the US fathers think that they work too much overtime as well as shift hours, and they also mention arguments with their partner about responsibility at home. At the same time, a majority of both US and Swedish fathers emphasize family as a priority over work. In terms of possible solutions, a common theme among Swedish fathers is to mention that ideal work hours would be less than their current hours, with some wishing for a shorter work week (e.g., 4 days) and others a shorter work day (e.g., 6 hours). US fathers most commonly wish for a more flexible work-life situation. In terms of actual changes, several fathers adjust their work lives in response to their family life. Among Swedish fathers, the most common changes involve working fewer hours, adjusting their start and end times, and taking advantage of flexible hours. Swedish fathers also emphasize trading off with their partners, including ‘shift parenting.’ As for US fathers, some have changed their job to be more at home, some changed from working three shifts and some fathers solved the situation by intense work during a limited time.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016 Edition: 1
Series
Global Masculinities
Keywords
Childcare, Family, Fathers, Sweden, US, Work
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-33182 (URN)978-1-137-59527-0 (ISBN)
Projects
The Fathers and the Motives. Swedish Paid Parental Leave in a Geographical Perspective
Available from: 2016-09-15 Created: 2016-09-15 Last updated: 2016-12-05Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, S., Björkman, B., Almqvist, A.-L., Almqvist, L., Björk-Willén, P., Donohue, D., . . . Hvit, S. (2015). Children's voices: Differentiating a child perspective from a child's perspective. Developmental Neurorehabilitation, 18(3), 162-168
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Children's voices: Differentiating a child perspective from a child's perspective
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 162-168Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The aim of this paper was to discuss differences between having a child perspective and taking the child’s perspective based on the problem being investigated.

Methods: Conceptual paper based on narrative review.

Results: The child’s perspective in research concerning children that need additional support are important. The difference between having a child perspective and taking the child’s perspective in conjunction with the need to know children’s opinions has been discussed in the literature. From an ideological perspective the difference between the two perspectives seems self-evident, but the perspectives might be better seen as different ends on a continuum solely from an adult’s view of children to solely the perspective of children themselves. Depending on the research question, the design of the study may benefit from taking either perspective. In this article, we discuss the difference between the perspectives based on the problem being investigated, children’s capacity to express opinions, environmental adaptations and the degree of interpretation needed to understand children’s opinions.

Conclusion: The examples provided indicate that children’s opinions can be regarded in most research, although to different degrees.

Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/17518423.2013.801529

Keywords
Child perspective, child’s perspective, methodology
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Research subject
Care Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-23176 (URN)10.3109/17518423.2013.801529 (DOI)000354216600004 ()2-s2.0-84929179113 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Att göra sin röst hörd - barns empowerment i förskolan
Available from: 2013-12-05 Created: 2013-12-05 Last updated: 2018-01-04Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6223-1109

Search in DiVA

Show all publications