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Sriyasak, A., Almqvist, A.-L., Sridawruang, C. & Häggström-Nordin, E. (2019). Healthcare providers' caring for Thai teenage parents: A focus group study. Midwifery, 69, 172-178
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Healthcare providers' caring for Thai teenage parents: A focus group study
2019 (English)In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 69, p. 172-178Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2019
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-42302 (URN)10.1016/j.midw.2018.09.010 (DOI)000454129800023 ()30279021 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054059229 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-10 Created: 2019-01-10 Last updated: 2019-11-10
Appelgren Engström, H., Häggström-Nordin, E., Borneskog, C. & Almqvist, A.-L. (2019). Mothers in same‐sex relationships—Striving for equal parenthood:: A grounded theory study. JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, 28(19-20), 3700-3709
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mothers in same‐sex relationships—Striving for equal parenthood:: A grounded theory study
2019 (English)In: JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, ISSN 0962-1067, Vol. 28, no 19-20, p. 3700-3709Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To get a deeper understanding of how mothers in same-sex relationships think and reason about their parenthood in terms of gender equality, and how they experience early parental support from child healthcare professionals. Background: There is an increasing amount of research on how women in same-sex relationships experience healthcare services when forming a family. Yet there is limited knowledge of what kind of early parental support these women may request. Design: Grounded theory. Follows guidelines for qualitative research (COREQ). Method: Twenty women ranging from 25 to 42 years of age participated in semi-structured interviews. Data collection and analysis took place in parallel, as recommended in grounded theory methodology. Results: The results are described by the core category Same-sex mothers request professional support to achieve equal parenthood, which includes five categories: (a) equality in everyday life, (b) diversity in mother and child attachment, (c) justification of the family structure, (d) ambivalent thoughts about their child's future and (e) a special need for networking and request for professional support. These findings provide a deeper understanding of how same-sex mothers experience their parenthood and the parental support that is offered. Conclusion: Child healthcare professionals need to be sensitive and recognise both mothers as equal parents and offer early parenting groups where two-mother families feel included and supported. Relevance to clinical practice: Healthcare professionals need to be aware of diverse family formations and meet each parent as a unique individual without heteronormative assumptions. Same-sex mothers must be treated as equal parents and acknowledged as mothers. Healthcare professionals should offer inclusive and supportive parental groups to same-sex families. They should also inform and support nonbirth mothers about the possibility to breastfeed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley Online library, 2019
Keywords
Caring, encounters, parental support, parenthood, qualitative study, Sweden, two‐mother families
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Health Sciences
Research subject
Care Sciences; Care Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-44983 (URN)10.1111/jocn.14971 (DOI)000477438700001 ()2-s2.0-85068736793 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Doktorandprojekt: Families with two mothers
Available from: 2019-08-12 Created: 2019-08-12 Last updated: 2019-12-12
Lassinantti, K. & Almqvist, A.-L. (2018). Being a "bad” mother?: Negotiations of gendered norms in parenthood. In: : . Paper presented at Swedish Network of Family and Kinship Studies.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Being a "bad” mother?: Negotiations of gendered norms in parenthood
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The aim of this paper, based on data from two Swedish interview studies conducted in 2010-2013 and 2015, is to critically investigate constructions of motherhood among women who identify themselves as having neuropsychiatric disabilities. The data, based on a selection of participants in the above mentioned interview studies include participants who identify themselves as women, who are parents to children under the age of majority, and who identify themselves as being a person with a neuropsychiatric disability. In the paper the women’s struggles of being perceived of, by others and by themselves, as "good mothers" are highlighted. To be a ‘good mother’ are by the women in the study constructed as abilities to organize the daily life of the family, organize and do household chores, keep track of the children’s activities, as well as the ability to clean and present a tidy and respectable home. Against these normative images of motherhood, where a ‘normal woman’ is positioned as someone who has an ability to organize the daily life of the family and present a respectable and tidy home, women in the studies position themselves as ‘deviant moms’. When they explain their lack of ability to organize and clean as being an effect of them having a cognitive, neuropsychiatric disability, they position themselves within a bio medicalizing discourse, where a certain way to ‘do mothering’ is constructed as a disability and a pathological deviation from normative motherhood. However, they also resist to be positioned as deviant and ‘bad mothers’ by positioning themselves within a norm critical resistance discourse that problematize gendered power relations, and notions of normative femininity connected to images of motherhood. 

 

National Category
Social Sciences Sociology
Research subject
Social Work; Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-46069 (URN)
Conference
Swedish Network of Family and Kinship Studies
Available from: 2019-11-15 Created: 2019-11-15 Last updated: 2019-12-18Bibliographically approved
Appelgren Engstrom, H., Häggström-Nordin, E., Borneskog-Sinclair, C. & Almqvist, A.-L. (2018). Mothers in Same-Sex Relationships Describe the Process of Forming a Family as a Stressful Journey in a Heteronormative World: A Swedish Grounded Theory Study.. Maternal and Child Health Journal, 22(10), 1444-1450
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mothers in Same-Sex Relationships Describe the Process of Forming a Family as a Stressful Journey in a Heteronormative World: A Swedish Grounded Theory Study.
2018 (English)In: Maternal and Child Health Journal, ISSN 1092-7875, E-ISSN 1573-6628, Vol. 22, no 10, p. 1444-1450Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives The aim of this study was to gain insight into how women in same-sex relationships experience the process of forming a family through the use of assisted reproduction technique (ART), from planning the pregnancy to parenthood, and their experience of parental support from healthcare professionals. Methods The participants were 20 women in a same-sex relationship who had conceived through ART at a Swedish clinic. Semi-structured interviews including open questions about pregnancy, parenthood and support from healthcare professionals were conducted. The interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. The data were analysed according to grounded theory. Results The core category, A stressful journey through a heteronormative world, emerged from the analysis, as did three subcategories: A journey fraught with difficulties and decisions; The nuclear family as the norm; and A need for psychological support. Same-sex parents expressed a need for more information about how to access ART in Sweden. Both the healthcare organization and treatment were perceived as heteronormative. In particular, these women lacked psychological support during the demanding process of utilizing a sperm donor to conceive. Conclusions for Practice Professionals in antenatal care should undergo mandatory cultural competency training to ensure cultural sensitivity and the provision of updated information, tailored brochures and early parental support for families with same-sex parents. All parents need guidance and support from competent, caring personnel throughout the entire process of forming a family.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Antenatal care; Assisted reproduction technique; Parental support; Women in same-sex relationships
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Care Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-41143 (URN)10.1007/s10995-018-2525-y (DOI)000445198600010 ()29740747 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85046650947 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Doktorandprojekt: Families with two mothers-experiences and support from health care providers
Available from: 2018-10-08 Created: 2018-10-08 Last updated: 2019-11-10
Sreyasak, A., Almqvist, A.-L., Sridawruang, C. & Häggström-Nordin, E. (2018). Parents’ experiences of their teenage children’s parenthood: An interview study. Nursing and Health Sciences, 20(1), 39-45
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parents’ experiences of their teenage children’s parenthood: An interview study
2018 (English)In: Nursing and Health Sciences, ISSN 1441-0745, E-ISSN 1442-2018, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 39-45Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, we described and analyzed parents’ experiences of teenage parenthood and the provision of support to their teenage children who had recently have become parents. A quali- tative method was used. In-depth interviews with 24 participants were conducted, all parents of teenage parents. Data were analyzed using content analysis; four themes and 11 subthemes were identified. The results show that parents’ norms and values were strongly influenced by their religious beliefs. The participants had mixed emotions and reactions to their teenage chil- dren’s parenthood. Also participants were sources of support to the teenage parents and assisted them in their transition to parenthood. However, the participants also expressed the importance that their teenage children continue their education and avoid repeated pregnan- cies. This study highlights how emotional, instrumental, and informational support provided by parents to their teenagers can assist the latter in their transition to parenthood. In their work with teenage parents, healthcare providers can benefit from teenage parent's own parents involvement and experiences. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
experience, in-depth interview, parent, support, teenage parenthood, Thailand
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Care Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-38353 (URN)10.1111/nhs.12378 (DOI)000426650900006 ()29094449 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85042934709 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Becoming a Thai teenage parent
Available from: 2018-01-25 Created: 2018-01-25 Last updated: 2019-11-10
Almqvist, A.-L. & Lassinantti, K. (2018). Social Work Practices for Young People with Complex Needs: An Integrative Review. Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal, 35(3), 207-219
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social Work Practices for Young People with Complex Needs: An Integrative Review
2018 (English)In: Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal, ISSN 0738-0151, E-ISSN 1573-2797, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 207-219Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this integrative review is to investigate research of social work practices for adolescents and young adults with complex needs. The research questions are: What are the major themes in studies of practices for young people with complex needs? How do studies suggest that complex needs can be met in ways that are beneficial for young people? A young person with complex needs is in this review defined as an adolescent or young adult who, due to mental ill-health in combination with different types of social vulnerabilities, is receiving assistance from multiple welfare services. Searches were conducted in seven databases. These searches resulted in a sample of 1677 records, published 2007-2016, which in the screening process were reduced to 24 publications, all peer-reviewed articles. The participants in the studies in the articles consisted of young people, parents and professionals from mainly Anglo-Saxon countries. The articles were analyzed with qualitative summative content analysis. Three empirically generated themes were found in studies of work practices targeting young people with complex needs: collaboration-, relationship- and empowerment-oriented practices. In conclusion, the practices contain a wide variety of features, but with the joint aim of acknowledging young people's needs. The results can be used by practitioners and policymakers to further the development of services for youth with mental ill-health and social vulnerabilities, who use multiple welfare services.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER, 2018
Keywords
Complex needs, Empowerment, Integrative review, Relationship, Social work practices, Young people
National Category
Health Sciences Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-41009 (URN)10.1007/s10560-017-0522-4 (DOI)000444094900001 ()2-s2.0-85038127731 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-27 Created: 2018-09-27 Last updated: 2019-12-09
Lassinantti, K. & Almqvist, A.-L. (2018). The categorization ‘complex needs’: Constructions of complexity as a problem in professionals’ discourse. In: : . Paper presented at Sociologidagarna, Lund, Sweden 7-9 mars 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The categorization ‘complex needs’: Constructions of complexity as a problem in professionals’ discourse
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In social work discourse, youth with mental ill-health in combination with social vulnerability are more frequently referred to as “youth with complex needs”. The aim of this paper, based on two interview studies, one with professionals in psychiatric care and social work, and one with youth (age 15-25 years), is to critically investigate how "complex needs" is used as a way to categorize youth. Youth with complex needs are by professionals in the study constructed as recipients of long-term but less successful support from social work services and psychiatric care. They are also, from the perspective of professionals, described as a category that in various ways present challenges for welfare services. Categorizations of people and needs are prerequisites for legal, bureaucratic and professional systems within the welfare state. Welfare organizations construct knowledge and strategies regarding specific target groups according to these categorizations. In the paper we discuss whether there is a risk that a categorization such as complex needs is used in a way that individualize problems, thereby obscuring problems that are related to complex organizations and care systems that cater for the needs of young people in less effective ways.

National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-46261 (URN)
Conference
Sociologidagarna, Lund, Sweden 7-9 mars 2018
Available from: 2019-12-09 Created: 2019-12-09 Last updated: 2019-12-18Bibliographically approved
Sriyasak, A., Almqvist, A.-L., Sridawruang, C., Neamsakul, W. & Häggström-Nordin, E. (2018). The New Generation of Thai Fathers: Breadwinners involved in Parenting. American Journal of Men's Health (5), 1368-1378
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The New Generation of Thai Fathers: Breadwinners involved in Parenting
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2018 (English)In: American Journal of Men's Health, ISSN 1557-9883, E-ISSN 1557-9891, no 5, p. 1368-1378Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Becoming a father for the first time might cause great changes in a man’s identity and lifestyle. Teenage fathers must strive to balance two competing roles: the teenage role and the father role. The current study design followed grounded theory methodology to gain a deeper understanding of how Thai teenage fathers reason about becoming and being a father from a gender equality perspective. Participants were selected from a heterogeneous group of fathers until saturation was reached (n = 25). Most of the fathers were cohabiting with their partner in an extended family. An interview guide was developed, a pilot study was undertaken, and interviews were performed on two different occasions: once during the second trimester of pregnancy and again when the baby was 5 to 6 months old. The core category, “Male breadwinners involved in parenting,” encompassed persons making the transition from being solely a teenager to being a teenage father. Most of the fathers accepted the unintended pregnancy and took on the expected breadwinning responsibility of a father. They prepared for fatherhood and changed their lifestyle. Their families provided support. Nevertheless, the fathers sought to avoid further unplanned parenthood by learning about family planning. The teenage fathers emphasized breadwinning first, then involved himself in the child and the housework. These findings provide an increased understanding of Thai teenage fathers.

Keywords
fatherhood; grounded theory; teenage fathers; Thailand
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Care Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-31707 (URN)10.1177/1557988316651062 (DOI)000441714200017 ()27215945 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85047889874 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-06-03 Created: 2016-06-03 Last updated: 2019-11-14Bibliographically approved
Almqvist, A.-L. & Lassinantti, K. (2018). Where Lies the Complexity?: Interviews with Swedish Young People who Receive Support from Social Services and Psychiatric Care.. In: : . Paper presented at Nationell konferens i socialt arbete, Örebro, Sweden 9-10 oktober 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Where Lies the Complexity?: Interviews with Swedish Young People who Receive Support from Social Services and Psychiatric Care.
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Mental ill-health among young people has increased in the past decades in Sweden as well as in other western countries. When mental ill-health is connected with social vulnerability such as difficulties in completing education, unemployment or substance abuse you may be considered to have “complex needs”. This paper presents findings from a project (2016-2018) in two municipalities. The data consists of semi-structured interviews from two sub studies. One with 13 young persons (15-25 years) who have been or are recipients of long-term support from social services as well as psychiatric care, and one with 24 professionals from social services and psychiatric care. The aim is to investigate young people’s and professionals’ experiences of work practices aiming at increased well-being for young people labelled as having complex needs. The research questions are: What barriers for work practices for sustainable support are there from the young people’s perspective? How to overcome work practice barriers for giving sustainable support, from the professionals’ perspective? The questions are reflected in three themes; empowerment, relationships and collaboration. Barriers mentioned by the young people are high employee turnover as well as too many professionals involved in activities. Professionals might have their own ideas about what should be done, not taking the wishes of the young person into consideration to a satisfying level. In collaboration between different organizations, the professionals consider it important with at least one person who has the influence in several of them. To take the young person seriously as well as staying on in difficult times are considered important. We argue that the expression complex needs, when used as a way to categorize young people, may obscure that the problem also lies with highly specialized and complex welfare state organizations.  They do not always succeed in catering for the interconnected needs of their clients.

National Category
Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-46262 (URN)
Conference
Nationell konferens i socialt arbete, Örebro, Sweden 9-10 oktober 2018
Available from: 2019-12-09 Created: 2019-12-09 Last updated: 2019-12-18Bibliographically approved
Almqvist, A.-L. & Lassinantti, K. (2018). Young people meet complex organisations: An interview study with Swedish service providers. In: : . Paper presented at International Sociological Association, XIX World Congress of Sociology, Toronto, Kanada, 15-21 juli 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Young people meet complex organisations: An interview study with Swedish service providers
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper presents findings from a Swedish interview study from 2016-2017 with 20 professionals working with young people, who suffer from a combination of mental ill-health and social vulnerability. They have been recipients of long-term support from multiple welfare service actors with the aim of promoting the young people’s wellbeing. The aim of the study is to investigate professionals’ experiences of work practices aiming at increased wellbeing for this group of young people. Mental ill-health among young people has increased in the past decades in Sweden as well as in many other western countries. Mental ill-health has also been connected with social vulnerability such as difficulties in completing education, unemployment, out-of-home care or substance abuse. This group of young people are sometimes referred to as youth with complex needs. Complex needs is a concept used to categorize people that have multiple interconnected needs that span medical and social issues, people that are considered as especially disadvantaged, or presenting challenges to welfare services. Categorizations of people and needs are prerequisites for legal, bureaucratic and professional systems within the welfare state. Welfare organizations construct knowledge and strategies regarding specific target groups according to these categorizations. In the paper we argue that the expression complex needs, when used as a way to categorize young people, not necessarily take into consideration that the problem instead may be the complex organizations that young people meet. These organizations may not always succeed in catering for the needs of young people.

National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-46070 (URN)
Conference
International Sociological Association, XIX World Congress of Sociology, Toronto, Kanada, 15-21 juli 2018
Available from: 2019-11-15 Created: 2019-11-15 Last updated: 2019-12-18Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6223-1109

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