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Håkansson Eklund, JakobORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7839-7245
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Publications (10 of 30) Show all publications
Skogevall, S., Holmström, I., Kaminsky, E. & Håkansson Eklund, J. (2020). A survey of telephone nurses' experiences in their encounters with frequent callers. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 76(4), 1019-1026
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A survey of telephone nurses' experiences in their encounters with frequent callers
2020 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 76, no 4, p. 1019-1026Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim The aim of this study was to describe telephone nurses' experiences of their encounters with frequent callers to Swedish Healthcare Direct. Design A descriptive inductive design with qualitative approach. Methods Data collection was performed during the period of September 2017 - June 2018. A total of 199 telephone nurses working at 10 Swedish Healthcare Direct sites with different geographical locations in Sweden answered a survey containing seven open-ended questions. Data analysis was performed during the period of September 2018 - June 2019. The answers were analysed using content analysis. Results The telephone nurses perceived that the encounters with frequent callers were sometimes frustrating as they felt unable to help. According to the telephone nurses, the frequent callers called about the same issues several times and the calls were often about loneliness and psychiatric problems. The telephone nurses were worried about missing something urgent; one of the aspects leading to this was the perception of knowing the caller. They expressed a wish to know more about frequent callers and strategies for helping them. A common care plan for frequent callers' calls was suggested. Conclusion Telephone nurses often found it difficult to handle calls from frequent callers. However, they had a will to care for frequent callers and to learn more about them. Therefore, a common strategy, education and training for telephone nurses in answering calls from frequent callers could be beneficial for both callers and telephone nurses. Impact statement This study offers insights to researchers, telephone nurses and managers of telephone nursing, regarding telephone nurses' experiences in handling frequent caller calls. These findings can offer direction for the content of a possible intervention.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2020
Keywords
frequent caller, repeated calling, Swedish healthcare direct, telephone nursing
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-47382 (URN)10.1111/jan.14308 (DOI)000518098300011 ()31997365 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-03-19 Created: 2020-03-19 Last updated: 2020-03-19Bibliographically approved
Höglander, J., Sundler, A. J., Spreeuwenberg, P., Holmström, I. K., Eide, H., van Dulmen, S. & Håkansson Eklund, J. (2019). Emotional communication with older people: A cross-sectional study of home care. Nursing and Health Sciences (3), 382-389, Article ID NHS12611.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emotional communication with older people: A cross-sectional study of home care
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2019 (English)In: Nursing and Health Sciences, ISSN 1442-2018, no 3, p. 382-389, article id NHS12611Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-42881 (URN)10.1111/nhs.12611 (DOI)000486246900015 ()30957364 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85063993689 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-03-07 Created: 2019-03-07 Last updated: 2020-03-12Bibliographically approved
Håkansson Eklund, J., Holmström, I. K., Ollén Lindqvist, A., Sundler, A. J., Hochwälder, J. & Marmstål Hammar, L. (2019). Empathy levels among nursing students: A comparative cross-sectional study. Nursing Open, 6(3), 983-989
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Empathy levels among nursing students: A comparative cross-sectional study
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2019 (English)In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 983-989Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: Empathy is a crucial component of the nurse–patient relationship, but knowledge is lacking as to when empathy develops during nursing education. The aim of the present study was to compare empathy levels at different stages of undergraduate nursing education and different master's nursing programmes. Design: The design was a comparative cross-sectional study. Methods: A total of 329 participants in Sweden, comprised of nursing students in their second and sixth semesters in an undergraduate nursing programme as well as master's nursing students, rated their own empathy using the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy. Results: Students in their sixth semester in an undergraduate nursing programme expressed more empathy than did students in their second semester and master's nursing students. Among the five master's programmes, public-health nursing students expressed the most empathy and intensive-care nursing students the least. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2019
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-44968 (URN)10.1002/nop2.280 (DOI)000476917700036 ()31367422 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85069773206 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-08-08 Created: 2019-08-08 Last updated: 2020-03-19Bibliographically approved
Skogevall, S., Holmström, I., Kaminsky, E. & Håkansson Eklund, J. (2019). Frequent callers to telenursing services. In: : . Paper presented at Royal College of Nursing, Sheffield, UK.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Frequent callers to telenursing services
2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-45436 (URN)
Conference
Royal College of Nursing, Sheffield, UK
Available from: 2019-10-07 Created: 2019-10-07 Last updated: 2020-01-28Bibliographically approved
Håkansson Eklund, J., Holmström, I. K., Kumlin, T., Kaminsky, E., Skoglund, K., Höglander, J., . . . Summer Meranius, M. (2019). "Same same or different?" A review of reviews of person-centered and patient-centered care. Patient Education and Counseling, 102(1), 3-11
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"Same same or different?" A review of reviews of person-centered and patient-centered care
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2019 (English)In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134, Vol. 102, no 1, p. 3-11Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To provide a synthesis of already synthesized literature on person-centered care and patient-centered care in order to identify similarities and differences between the two concepts. Methods: A synthesis of reviews was conducted to locate synthesized literature published between January 2000 and March 2017. A total of 21 articles deemed relevant to this overview were synthesized using a thematic analysis. Results: The analysis resulted in nine themes present in person-centered as well as in patient-centered care: (1) empathy, (2), respect (3), engagement, (4), relationship, (5) communication, (6) shared decision-making, (7) holistic focus, (8), individualized focus, and (9) coordinated care. The analysis also revealed that the goal of person-centered care is a meaningful life while the goal of patient-centered care is a functional life. Conclusions: While there are a number of similarities between the two concepts, the goals for person-centered and patient-centered care differ. The similarities are at the surface and there are important differences when the concepts are regarded in light of their different goals. Practice implications: Clarification of the concepts may assist practitioners to develop the relevant aspects of care. Person-centered care broadens and extends the perspective of patient-centered care by considering the whole life of the patient.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER IRELAND LTD, 2019
Keywords
Patient-centered, Person-centered, Literature review, Concept analysis, Care
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-41771 (URN)10.1016/j.pec.2018.08.029 (DOI)000452381100002 ()30201221 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85052965545 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-12-20 Created: 2018-12-20 Last updated: 2020-03-19Bibliographically approved
Håkansson Eklund, J., Holmström, I. K., Kumlin, T., Kaminsky, E., Skoglund, K., Höglander, J., . . . Summer Meranius, M. (2019). "Same same or different?" A review of reviews of person-centered and patient-centred care. In: Royal college of Nursing, Sheffield, UK: . Paper presented at Royal college of Nursing, Sheffield, UK.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"Same same or different?" A review of reviews of person-centered and patient-centred care
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2019 (English)In: Royal college of Nursing, Sheffield, UK, 2019Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-45437 (URN)
Conference
Royal college of Nursing, Sheffield, UK
Available from: 2019-10-07 Created: 2019-10-07 Last updated: 2020-01-28Bibliographically approved
Hansen, E. M., Håkansson Eklund, J., Hallen, A., Bjurhager, C., Norrström, E., Viman, A. & Stocks, E. L. (2018). Does Feeling Empathy Lead to Compassion Fatigue or Compassion Satisfaction?: The Role of Time Perspective. Journal of Psychology, 152(8), 630-645
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does Feeling Empathy Lead to Compassion Fatigue or Compassion Satisfaction?: The Role of Time Perspective
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0022-3980, E-ISSN 1940-1019, Vol. 152, no 8, p. 630-645Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research has shown that feeling empathy sometimes leads to compassion fatigue and sometimes to compassion satisfaction. In three studies, participants recalled an instance when they felt empathy in order to assess the role time perspective plays in how empathizers perceive the consequences of empathy. Study 1 revealed that college students perceive empathy as having more negative consequences in the short term, but more positive consequences in the long term. Study 2 showed that service industry professionals perceive the consequences of feeling empathy for customers who felt bad as less negative, and the consequences of feeling empathy for people who felt good as less positive, in the long as opposed to the short term. Because Studies 1 and 2 confounded time perspective with event specificity a third study was conducted in which event specificity was held constant across time perspectives. The same pattern of results emerged. The results of these studies indicate that perceptions of the effects of feeling empathy, whether positive or negative, become less extreme over time. These findings shed light on the relation between empathy and compassion fatigue and satisfaction by suggesting that situations that initially are experienced as stressful can over time make the empathizer stronger.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2018
Keywords
Empathy, compassion fatigue, compassion satisfaction, feeling, time
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-42254 (URN)10.1080/00223980.2018.1495170 (DOI)000453701800006 ()30321113 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85055053458 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-03 Created: 2019-01-03 Last updated: 2019-10-25
Höglander, J., Sundler Johansson, A., Spreeuwenberg, P., Holmström, I., Eide, H., van Dulmen, S. & Håkansson Eklund, J. (2018). Female gender explains emotional communication in home care. In: International Conference on Communication in Healthcare, Porto, Portugal: . Paper presented at International Conference on Communication in Healthcare, Porto, Portugal.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Female gender explains emotional communication in home care
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2018 (English)In: International Conference on Communication in Healthcare, Porto, Portugal, 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-45446 (URN)
Conference
International Conference on Communication in Healthcare, Porto, Portugal
Available from: 2019-10-07 Created: 2019-10-07 Last updated: 2019-12-18Bibliographically approved
Håkansson Eklund, J., Holmström, I. K., Kumlin, T., Kaminsky, E., Skoglund, K., Höglander, J., . . . Summer Meranius, M. (2018). "Same same or different?" A review of reviews of person-centred and patinet-centred care. In: International Conference on Communication in Healthcare, Porto, Portugal: . Paper presented at International Conference on Communication in Healthcare, Porto, Portugal.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"Same same or different?" A review of reviews of person-centred and patinet-centred care
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2018 (English)In: International Conference on Communication in Healthcare, Porto, Portugal, 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-45447 (URN)
Conference
International Conference on Communication in Healthcare, Porto, Portugal
Available from: 2019-10-07 Created: 2019-10-07 Last updated: 2020-01-28Bibliographically approved
Sundler, A. J., Höglander, J., Håkansson Eklund, J., Eide, H. & Holmström, I. K. (2017). Older persons' expressions of emotional cues and concerns during home care visits. Application of the Verona coding definitions of emotional sequences (VR-CoDES) in home care. Patient Education and Counseling, 100(2), 276-282
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Older persons' expressions of emotional cues and concerns during home care visits. Application of the Verona coding definitions of emotional sequences (VR-CoDES) in home care
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2017 (English)In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134, Vol. 100, no 2, p. 276-282Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: This study aims to a) explore to what extent older persons express emotional cues and concerns during home care visits; b) describe what cues and concerns these older persons expressed, and c) explore who initiated these cues and concerns. Methods: A descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted. Data consisted of 188 audio recorded home care visits with older persons and registered nurses or nurse assistants, coded with the Verona coding definitions on emotional sequences (VR-CoDES). Results: Emotional expressions of cues and concerns occurred in 95 (51%) of the 188 recorded home care visits. Most frequent were implicit expressions of cues (n = 292) rather than explicit concerns (n = 24). Utterances with hints to hidden concerns (63,9%, n = 202) were most prevalent, followed by vague or unspecific expressions of emotional worries (15,8%, n = 50). Most of these were elicited by the nursing staff (63%, n = 200). Conclusion: Emotional needs expressed by the older persons receiving home care were mainly communicated implicitly. To be attentive to such vaguely expressed emotions may demand nursing staff to be sensitive and open. Practice implications: The VR-CoDES can be applied on audio recorded home care visits to analyse verbal and emotional communication, and may allow comparative research. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER IRELAND LTD, 2017
Keywords
Patient-provider communication, Concern, Cue, Home care, Nursing
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-35123 (URN)10.1016/j.pec.2016.09.009 (DOI)000396886000013 ()27692492 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84999029525 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-04-06 Created: 2017-04-06 Last updated: 2020-03-20Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7839-7245

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