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Publications (10 of 16) Show all publications
Hansen, E. M., Håkansson Eklund, J., Hallen, A., Bjurhager, C., Norrström, E., Viman, A. & Stocks, E. L. (2018). Does Feeling Empathy Lead to Compassion Fatigue or Compassion Satisfaction?: The Role of Time Perspective. Journal of Psychology, 152(8), 630-645
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does Feeling Empathy Lead to Compassion Fatigue or Compassion Satisfaction?: The Role of Time Perspective
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0022-3980, E-ISSN 1940-1019, Vol. 152, no 8, p. 630-645Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research has shown that feeling empathy sometimes leads to compassion fatigue and sometimes to compassion satisfaction. In three studies, participants recalled an instance when they felt empathy in order to assess the role time perspective plays in how empathizers perceive the consequences of empathy. Study 1 revealed that college students perceive empathy as having more negative consequences in the short term, but more positive consequences in the long term. Study 2 showed that service industry professionals perceive the consequences of feeling empathy for customers who felt bad as less negative, and the consequences of feeling empathy for people who felt good as less positive, in the long as opposed to the short term. Because Studies 1 and 2 confounded time perspective with event specificity a third study was conducted in which event specificity was held constant across time perspectives. The same pattern of results emerged. The results of these studies indicate that perceptions of the effects of feeling empathy, whether positive or negative, become less extreme over time. These findings shed light on the relation between empathy and compassion fatigue and satisfaction by suggesting that situations that initially are experienced as stressful can over time make the empathizer stronger.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2018
Keywords
Empathy, compassion fatigue, compassion satisfaction, feeling, time
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-42254 (URN)10.1080/00223980.2018.1495170 (DOI)000453701800006 ()30321113 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85055053458 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-03 Created: 2019-01-03 Last updated: 2019-10-14Bibliographically approved
Angantyr, M., Hansen, E. M., Eklund, J. & Malm, K. (2016). Reducing Sex Differences in Children’s Empathy for Animals Through a Training Intervention. Journal of Research in Childhood Education, 30(3), 273-281
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reducing Sex Differences in Children’s Empathy for Animals Through a Training Intervention
2016 (English)In: Journal of Research in Childhood Education, ISSN 0256-8543, E-ISSN 2150-2641, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 273-281Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

ABSTRACT: Humane education programs designed to increase children’s empathy for animals are becoming more common. A quasi-experiment tested the effectiveness of one such program by comparing 80 children who had completed the program with a control group of 57 children who had not. The children read a story involving an injured dog and rated the degree of empathic concern they felt for him. The results showed that girls tended to express more empathy for a dog than did boys, but this difference was not significant for children who underwent an animal empathy training program. This suggests that humane education programs can reduce sex differences by increasing boys’ empathy. 

Keywords
Animals, children, empathy, empathy training, gender differences
National Category
Psychology Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-32381 (URN)10.1080/02568543.2016.1178198 (DOI)000391018000001 ()2-s2.0-84976343030 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-07-14 Created: 2016-07-14 Last updated: 2018-01-03Bibliographically approved
Isaksson, K., Hansen, E. & Loeb, C. (2013). Health promoting leadership, concepts models and behavior. In: : . Paper presented at European Congress of Psychology, Stockholm 2013.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health promoting leadership, concepts models and behavior
2013 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Working Life Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-23771 (URN)
Conference
European Congress of Psychology, Stockholm 2013
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2013-12-19 Created: 2013-12-19 Last updated: 2015-11-13Bibliographically approved
Loeb, C., Isaksson, K. & Hansen, E. M. (2013). Impact of a health promoting leadership intervention on emotional self-efficacy and work engagement. In: : . Paper presented at The 13th European Congress of Psychology, Stockholm, 9–12 July, 2013.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of a health promoting leadership intervention on emotional self-efficacy and work engagement
2013 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Working Life Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-23463 (URN)
Conference
The 13th European Congress of Psychology, Stockholm, 9–12 July, 2013
Projects
Re-Su-Lead
Available from: 2013-12-12 Created: 2013-12-12 Last updated: 2018-02-21Bibliographically approved
Isaksson, K., Mohr, G., Hansen, E., Loeb, C. & Stempel, C. (2013). Organizational interventions in a cultural context – Health promoting leadership in Germany and Sweden. In: : . Paper presented at American Psychological Association APA Work and Stress 2013.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Organizational interventions in a cultural context – Health promoting leadership in Germany and Sweden
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2013 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Working Life Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-23769 (URN)
Conference
American Psychological Association APA Work and Stress 2013
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2013-12-19 Created: 2013-12-19 Last updated: 2015-11-13Bibliographically approved
Isaksson, K., Hansen, E. M. & Loeb, C. (2012). Hälsofrämjande ledarskap- gamla och nya modeller och begrepp. In: : . Paper presented at Föreningen svensk arbetslivsforskning FALF, 11-13 juni, 2012, Karlstads universitet. Karlsatad
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hälsofrämjande ledarskap- gamla och nya modeller och begrepp
2012 (Swedish)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Karlsatad: , 2012
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Working Life Studies; Working Life Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-14942 (URN)
Conference
Föreningen svensk arbetslivsforskning FALF, 11-13 juni, 2012, Karlstads universitet
Projects
RE-SU-LEAD
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2012-06-28 Created: 2012-06-28 Last updated: 2018-02-21Bibliographically approved
Eklund, J., Loeb, C., Hansen, E. M. & Andersson-Wallin, A.-C. (2012). Who cares about others?: Empathic self-efficacy as an antecedent to prosocial behavior. Current Research in Social Psychology, 20(3), 31-41
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Who cares about others?: Empathic self-efficacy as an antecedent to prosocial behavior
2012 (English)In: Current Research in Social Psychology, ISSN 1088-7423, E-ISSN 1088-7423, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 31-41Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Two studies tested associations among self-efficacy and prosocial behavior. In Study 1 wemeasured academic self-efficacy, emotional self-efficacy and self-reported prosocial behavior.The study showed that academic but not emotional self-efficacy was positively correlated withprosocial behavior. Study 1 included only self-oriented emotions, and the absence of empathicemotions may explain the lack of association between emotional self-efficacy and prosocialbehavior. In Study 2 we included empathic as well as self-oriented emotions, because previousresearch (C. D. Batson, 1991) has shown that empathic emotions generate altruistic helping. Asexpected, empathic self-efficacy had a positive association with prosocial behavior. Empathicself-efficacy appears to be an important, largely overlooked antecedent to prosocial behavior.

National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-16168 (URN)2-s2.0-84882240140 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-11-19 Created: 2012-11-19 Last updated: 2018-02-21Bibliographically approved
Angantyr, M., Eklund, J. & Hansen, E. (2011). A comparison of empathy for humans and empathy for animals. Anthrozoos, 24(4), 369-377
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A comparison of empathy for humans and empathy for animals
2011 (English)In: Anthrozoos, ISSN 0892-7936, E-ISSN 1753-0377, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 369-377Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although there is a substantial body of research on inter-human empathy and inter-animal empathy, there is a dearth of research comparing humans’ empathic reactions to humans and animals. To address this issue, three experiments were conducted in which participants read a scenario about a human or animal abuse victim in need of medical attention, and indicated the degree of empathy they felt on an emotional response scale. In Experiment 1, women felt significantly more empathy for animals than humans, whereas men tended to express more empathy for humans than for animals. In Experiment 2, adult women expressed the same degree of empathy for a child as for a puppy. Similarly, in Experiment 3, adult men and women expressed the same degree of empathy for a baby as for a puppy. Overall, results indicated that people feel at least as much empathy for animals as for humans. We suggest that an animal target elicits a great deal of empathy partly because it is perceived as not being responsible for having caused the need situation. Future research will show whether empathy felt for animals translates to prosocial behavior toward them as well.

Keywords
Empathy compassion animals dogs
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-20867 (URN)10.2752/175303711X13159027359764 (DOI)000297567300002 ()2-s2.0-80054739523 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-08-07 Created: 2013-08-07 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Rasoal, C., Eklund, J. & Hansen, E. M. (2011). Toward a conceptualization of ethnocultural empathy. The Journal of Social, Evolutionary, and Cultural Psychology, 5(1), 1-13
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Toward a conceptualization of ethnocultural empathy
2011 (English)In: The Journal of Social, Evolutionary, and Cultural Psychology, ISSN 1933-5377, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although a number of theoretical frameworks have been developed in previous empathy research, the extent to which these frameworks consider cultural and ethnic aspects is limited. This literature study reviews the most influential frameworks of general and ethnocultural empathy. The core components of ethnocultural empathy are identified as well as factors facilitating empathy for persons from other cultures. Most notably, the realization that people in other cultures have similar worries and goals should facilitate ethnocultural empathy, in both informal and professional contexts. This analysis can provide useful insights and tools for practitioners working with patients and clients from cultures other than their own. © 2011 Journal of Social, Evolutionary, and Cultural Psychology.

Keywords
ethnocultural empathy; goals; practitioners; ethnic aspects; cultural aspects
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-17555 (URN)10.1037/h0099278 (DOI)2-s2.0-80052989233 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-01-10 Created: 2013-01-10 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Ihrmark, C., Hansen, E. M., Eklund, J. & Stödberg, R. (2011). "You are weeping for that which has been your delight": To experience and recover from grief. Omega, 64(3), 223-239
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"You are weeping for that which has been your delight": To experience and recover from grief
2011 (English)In: Omega, ISSN 0030-2228, E-ISSN 1541-3764, Vol. 64, no 3, p. 223-239Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To explore how people experience grief and what factors are perceived as facilitating successful grief work, a survey was distributed to people who had completed a grief recovery course. The results showed that emotions, cognitions, physical expressions, and behaviors all characterize grief, but that emotions are the most central component. The course brought relief and was regarded most favorably by those having at least 1 year between the grief trigger event and participation in the course. Writing a letter in whichcourse participants express their feelings to the loss object was perceived as the most successful aspect of the course. The letter might help with grief recovery by bringing aspects that have not been dealt with into conscious awareness.

National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-17557 (URN)10.2190/OM.64.3.c (DOI)000300379000003 ()2-s2.0-84858675748 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-01-10 Created: 2013-01-10 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4225-8718

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