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Priebe, Å., Wiklund, L. & Fredriksson, L. (2018). A sanctuary of safety: A study of how patients with dual diagnosis experience caring conversations. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 27(2), 856-865
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A sanctuary of safety: A study of how patients with dual diagnosis experience caring conversations
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 856-865Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The prevalence of dual diagnosis, that is, the combination of psychiatric illnesses and substance use disorders, is high. As a vast majority of previous research in this context focusses on the effects of different treatment methods, rather than interpersonal issues, the purpose of the present study was to explore and illuminate in what way patients with a dual diagnosis experience conversations with nurses in an outpatient clinic to be caring. Five patients were interviewed regarding their experiences of caring conversations. The analysis and interpretation were inspired by a previously-used hermeneutical process. These yielded three themes: (i) reciprocity creates safety and communion; (ii) suffering is made visible and understandable; and (iii) self-esteem is restored. When synthesized, these themes gave rise to a main theme - a sanctuary of safety - where suffering is alleviated and dignity and self-esteem are restored. It is concluded that the caring conversation contributes to experiences of safeness. In this specific context, safety appears to be more fundamental than trust for patients' recoveries. The caring conversation also contributes to recovery, as it supports the individual's learning and understanding as a way to cope with problems, which also enables patients to make informed decisions about their own care. The caring conversation contributes to the alleviation of suffering and restoration of dignity and self-esteem for patients with a dual diagnosis. However, there is a need for further research focussing on how the caring conversation can contribute to psychiatric nurses' caring expertise

Keywords
dual diagnosis; mental illness; nurse-patient relationship; psychiatric illness; substance use disorder
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Health Sciences
Research subject
Care Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-36225 (URN)10.1111/inm.12374 (DOI)000428413100036 ()28786170 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85044474125 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-08-14 Created: 2017-08-14 Last updated: 2018-10-16Bibliographically approved
Wiklund, L. (2018). Being mindful as a phenomenological attitude. Journal of Holistic Nursing, 36(3), 272-281
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Being mindful as a phenomenological attitude
2018 (English)In: Journal of Holistic Nursing, ISSN 0898-0101, E-ISSN 1552-5724, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 272-281Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of this article is to reflect on being mindful as a phenomenological attitude rather than on describing mindfulness as a therapeutic intervention. I will also explore the possibilities that being mindful might open up in relation to nursing research and holistic nursing. Design and Method: I will describe and interpret mindfulness as a state of being by means of van Manen’s phenomenological method, using the language of phenomenology rather than the language of reductionist science. Thus, this article can be considered a reflective narrative, describing both the process of orienting to the phenomenon, making preunderstandings—including own experiences of mindfulness—visible, and a thematic analysis of nine scientific articles describing the phenomenon. Findings: Being mindful as a phenomenological attitude can be described as a deliberate intentionality, where the person is present in the moment and open to what is going on, bridling personal values and accepting the unfamiliar, thus achieving a sense of being peacefully situated in the world, and able to apprehend one’s being-in-the-world. Conclusions: Being mindful as a phenomenological attitude can contribute not only to phenomenological nursing research but also support nurses’ presence and awareness

Keywords
lived experiences, phenomenology, reflective narrative, van Manen
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Care Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-36224 (URN)10.1177/0898010117724928 (DOI)000441596600008 ()28793814 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85051624765 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-08-14 Created: 2017-08-14 Last updated: 2018-10-16Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, N. T. & Wiklund, L. (2018). Hermeneutic Inquiry: Researching Lived Experience of Mental Health and Recovery in a Christian Monastery in Contemporary Sweden. Sage Publications
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hermeneutic Inquiry: Researching Lived Experience of Mental Health and Recovery in a Christian Monastery in Contemporary Sweden
2018 (English)Other (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this case study, we, the student Nadya and her supervisor Lena, will describe the processand challenges associated with conducting an empirical study for a master’s degree in caringscience in psychiatric nursing. We will describe how the idea for the thesis evolved, theoreticaland practical preparations, as well as methodological procedures in relation to data collectionand analysis. We will also share some reflections we made in relation to challengesencountered during this study. Many of these reflections were directed toward methodologicalaspects of the study. However, along the way, it also became clear that experiences fromconducting the study also yielded important knowledge and understanding about mental healthcare. The reflections about what happened in the encounter between Nadya and theparticipants added depth not only to our understanding of the subject for this study, that is,how mental health, care, and recovery are experienced by people in a Christian monastery incontemporary Sweden, but also shed light on important aspects of mental health nursing inrelation to modern psychiatry.

Place, publisher, year, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
Hermeneutics, lived experiences
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Health Sciences
Research subject
Care Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-38101 (URN)10.4135/9781526440341 (DOI)978-1-5264-4034-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-01-19 Created: 2018-01-19 Last updated: 2018-01-29Bibliographically approved
Sellin, L., Kumlin, T., Wallsten, T. & Wiklund Gustin, L. (2017). Experiences of a recovery-oriented caring approach to suicidality: A single case study. , 12, Article ID 1287985.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiences of a recovery-oriented caring approach to suicidality: A single case study
2017 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-37226 (URN)
Available from: 2017-11-09 Created: 2017-11-09 Last updated: 2017-11-09Bibliographically approved
Wiklund, L. (2017). Förståelse och personcentrerad vård inom psykiatrisk omvårdnad (1ed.). In: Dahlberg, Karin & Ekman, Inger (Ed.), Vägen till patientens värld och personcentrerad vård: (pp. 243-268). Stockholm: Liber
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Förståelse och personcentrerad vård inom psykiatrisk omvårdnad
2017 (Swedish)In: Vägen till patientens värld och personcentrerad vård / [ed] Dahlberg, Karin & Ekman, Inger, Stockholm: Liber, 2017, 1, p. 243-268Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Liber, 2017 Edition: 1
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Health Sciences
Research subject
Care Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-36226 (URN)9789147112715 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-08-14 Created: 2017-08-14 Last updated: 2017-10-16Bibliographically approved
Wiklund, L. (2017). Medlidande och 'compassion' (2ed.). In: Wiklund Gustin, Lena & Bergbom, Ingegerd (Ed.), Vårdvetenskapliga begrepp i teori och praktik (2 uppl): (pp. 353-366). Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Medlidande och 'compassion'
2017 (Swedish)In: Vårdvetenskapliga begrepp i teori och praktik (2 uppl) / [ed] Wiklund Gustin, Lena & Bergbom, Ingegerd, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2017, 2, p. 353-366Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2017 Edition: 2
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Health Sciences
Research subject
Care Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-36228 (URN)9789144112435 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-08-14 Created: 2017-08-14 Last updated: 2017-10-16Bibliographically approved
Sellin, L., Asp, M., Kumlin, T., Wallsten, T. & Wiklund Gustin, L. (2017). To be present, share and nurture: a lifeworld phenomenological study of relatives' participation in the suicidal person's recovery. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 12, Article ID 1287985.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>To be present, share and nurture: a lifeworld phenomenological study of relatives' participation in the suicidal person's recovery
Show others...
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 12, article id 1287985Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In today's health care, participation is acknowledged as important. However, there is limited research on how relatives of patients at risk of suicide experience their opportunities to participate in care during periods when their close ones are subject to inpatient care. The aim of this study was to describe the phenomenon of participation, as experienced by relatives of persons who are subject to inpatient psychiatric care due to a risk of suicide. The study was conducted through a reflective lifeworld research (RLR) approach, based on phenomenological philosophy. Eight relatives of patients receiving care from professionals in a psychiatric specialist health care context in Sweden participated in phenomenon-oriented interviews. Data were analysed to elucidate a meaning structure of the phenomenon. The findings show that the phenomenon of participation was more associated with patients' recovery processes than with the caring process, and means "being actively involved in a process in which the person regains the desire to live". The meaning of participation is further described by its meaning constituents: struggling for being able to be present for the person at risk of suicide, being able to share everyday life, and nurturing sources for vitality. These insights into the meaning of participation highlight the importance of allowing supportive relatives to be a part of the patient's life, while the person is cared for in an inpatient hospital setting. Thus, participation enables relatives to be acknowledged as resourceful human beings in the patient's recovery process, and thereby facilitates a sense of being able to manage and share life itself together with the person. This means that mental health nurses need to recognize individual variations of relatives' participation processes, and take on the responsibility of acknowledging relatives' lifeworlds.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2017
Keywords
Caring science, interpersonal relationships, lived body, mental health nursing, person-centred care, phenomenology, psychiatry, relatives' experiences, suicidality, vitality
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-35130 (URN)000396166400001 ()28245364 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85027697273 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-04-06 Created: 2017-04-06 Last updated: 2017-11-09Bibliographically approved
Wiklund, L. & Bergbom, I. (2017). Vårdvetenskapliga begrepp i teori och praktik (2ed.). Lund: Studentlitteratur
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vårdvetenskapliga begrepp i teori och praktik
2017 (Swedish)Book (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

En vetenskap och dess teorier byggs upp av begrepp som på olika sätt relaterar till varandra och beskriver vetenskapens sätt att se på den egna verksamheten. Tillsammans formar begreppen en syn på verkligheten som kan te sig mer eller mindre abstrakt, samtidigt som abstraktionsnivån också bidrar till att teorier kan ha såväl djup som omfång. I den här boken fokuseras begrepp som anses viktiga inom vårdvetenskapen.

Huvuddelen av boken beskriver begrepp som utvecklats av forskare från Sverige, Finland och Norge. Både övergripande begrepp som exempelvis hälsa och vårdande och mer avgränsade begrepp som vila, vårdande kommunikation och tröst tas upp i boken. I denna andra upplaga har texten utöver några nya begrepp även kompletterats med reflektionsfrågor och övningar.

Boken vänder sig till studerande i sjuksköterskeprogrammet och olika specialistsjuksköterskeprogram, men passar också andra yrkesgrupper i vårdande verksamheter och de som är intresserade av att förstå mer om vårdvetenskap 
i allmänhet, och om dess begrepp och språkanvändning i synnerhet

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2017. p. 468 Edition: 2
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Health Sciences
Research subject
Care Sciences; Care Sciences; Care Sciences; Care Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-36227 (URN)9789144112435 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-08-14 Created: 2017-08-14 Last updated: 2017-09-27Bibliographically approved
Wiklund Gustin, L. (2016). Co-creation of Narrative Data: An Ethical and Methodological Challenge. Paper presented at Qualitative Methods (QM) Conference, Glasgow, Skottland, UK, 3-5 maj.. International Journal of Qualitative Methods, 15(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Co-creation of Narrative Data: An Ethical and Methodological Challenge
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, ISSN 1609-4069, E-ISSN 1609-4069, Vol. 15, no 1Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In qualitative research articles, different approaches to narrative analysis are frequently described. Even though methods for collecting data are described, less focus has been put on narrative data from an epistemological point of view. However, as humans, we live in a storied world. To narrate is a way to create meaning by organizing and structuring events, and the narrative is also considered to have an identity-creating nature. This has implications for research not only for how we represent the world in our research but also for how we understand the interaction between interviewer and interviewee. Hence, narration cannot be reduced to the transformation of data from the participant to the researcher. Rather narration must be understood as a way to relate to another human being. In this presentation, I will take my point of departure in narration as an aspect of self-understanding, and the ethical and methodological challenges associated with the dialogical relationship between the researcher and the participant. Influenced by Paul Ricoeur’s philosophy as well as theories about caring conversation I will reflect on the significance of concepts like autonomy, mutuality, asymmetry, and presence in relation to narrative research. This reflection will provide basis not only for ethical reflections but also for methodological considerations concerning trustworthiness and narrative truth.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2016
Keywords
Data collection, Hermeneutic research, Ethics
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Health Sciences
Research subject
Care Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-34761 (URN)10.1177/1609406916672113 (DOI)000389921700479 ()
Conference
Qualitative Methods (QM) Conference, Glasgow, Skottland, UK, 3-5 maj.
Available from: 2017-02-02 Created: 2017-02-02 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Salzmann-Erikson, M., Rydlo, C. & Wiklund Gustin, L. (2016). Getting to know the person behind the illness - the significance of interacting with patients hospitalised in forensic psychiatric settings. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 25(9-10), 1426-1434
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Getting to know the person behind the illness - the significance of interacting with patients hospitalised in forensic psychiatric settings
2016 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 25, no 9-10, p. 1426-1434Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims and objectives: To describe what nurses want to accomplish in relationships with patients who are hospitalised in forensic psychiatric settings. Background: Relationships between staff and patients in forensic psychiatric settings should be grounded in trust and confidence, and the patients need opportunities for emotional reconciliation. However, relationships can be challenging for nurses, who sometimes distance themselves from patients' expressions of suffering. The role of forensic mental health nurses is nebulous, as are the prescriptives and the implementation of nursing practices. Design: Qualitative descriptive design. Methods: In-depth interviews with five nurses who all work in forensic psychiatric settings. Results: We present a descriptive analysis of what nurses want to accomplish in relationships with patients who are hospitalised in forensic psychiatric settings. The results are presented in two main categories: (1) getting to know the person behind the illness and (2) making a difference. Conclusion: Care in forensic psychiatry needs to shift towards a more long-term view of the role of nursing, focusing less on the traditional and stereotypical identity of the productive nurse and more on the care given when nurses slow down and take the time to see the patients as individuals. Establishing trusting relationships with patients in forensic psychiatric settings is viewed as a less oppressive way to control patients and guide them in directions that are preferable for the nurses and for the society. Relevance to clinical practice: Nurses may use simple strategies in their daily practice such as sitting on the sofa with patients to establish trust. We stress that nurses should abandon policing roles and custodial activities in favour of guiding principles that promote individual recovery, treatment and health-promoting care.

Keywords
Forensic psychiatric care, Identity, Interactions, Mental health nursing, Nurse-patient relationship, Psychiatric nursing, clinical practice, controlled study, doctor patient relation, forensic psychiatry, human, human experiment, interview, mental health, normal human, nursing practice, stress, trust
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-31477 (URN)10.1111/jocn.13252 (DOI)000374506500026 ()26997335 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84962840852 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-04-28 Created: 2016-04-28 Last updated: 2018-10-16Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9714-577X

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