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Eriksson, Y. & Berglund, R. (2019). Improving Quality in Higher Education by using Living Lab Methods. In: Proceedings of the OpenLivingLab Days Conference: Co-creating Innovation: Scaling-up from Local to Global. Paper presented at OpenLivingLab Days 2019 conference. 3rd to 5th of September 2019, Thessaloniki, Greece (pp. 394-407).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improving Quality in Higher Education by using Living Lab Methods
2019 (English)In: Proceedings of the OpenLivingLab Days Conference: Co-creating Innovation: Scaling-up from Local to Global, 2019, p. 394-407Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This conceptual paper presents a Living Lab model of how university, societyand organisation may strengthen the co-creation capacity on regional and international level to improve quality in higher education. Our conclusions are that successful co-creation between universities and society/organizations is built on mutual contribution, knowledge sharing as well as engagement from all involved. Here, living lab methods can help improve quality. Further, from a university perspective, a challenge is to keep the engagement in the project from all involved, and to assure an equal status between stakeholders. This calls fora skill in how to conduct project in co-creation with several partners. A skill that has to be taught to students as well as to teachers and researchers.

National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-46294 (URN)9789082102796 (ISBN)
Conference
OpenLivingLab Days 2019 conference. 3rd to 5th of September 2019, Thessaloniki, Greece
Available from: 2019-12-11 Created: 2019-12-11 Last updated: 2019-12-11Bibliographically approved
Axelsson, K., Eriksson, Y. & Berglund, A. (Eds.). (2019). Improving Quality in Higher Education byusing Living Lab Methods. Paper presented at The OpenLivingLab Days Conference 2019. Co-creating Innovation: Scaling-up from Local to Global. Brussels, Belgium: enoll.org
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improving Quality in Higher Education byusing Living Lab Methods
2019 (English)Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This conceptual paper presents a Living Lab model of how university, society and organisation may strengthen the co-creation capacity on regional and international level to improve quality in higher education. Our conclusions are that successful co-creation between universities and society/organizations is built on mutual contribution, knowledge sharing as well as engagement from all involved. Here, living lab methods can help improve quality. Further, from a university perspective, a challenge is to keep the engagement in the project from all involved, and to assure an equal status between stakeholders. This calls for a skill in how to conduct project in co-creation with several partners. A skill that has to be taught to students as well as to teachers and researchers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Brussels, Belgium: enoll.org, 2019. p. 11
Series
Proceedings of the OpenLivingLab Days Conference 2019 © 2019 ENoLL - European Network of Living Labs
Keywords
Lifelong learning, Co-creation, Living Lab, Higher education, User involvement
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-46654 (URN)9789082102796 (ISBN)
Conference
The OpenLivingLab Days Conference 2019. Co-creating Innovation: Scaling-up from Local to Global
Available from: 2020-01-05 Created: 2020-01-05 Last updated: 2020-02-24Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, P. E. & Eriksson, Y. (2019). Live-action Communication Design: A Technical How-To Video Case Study. Technical Communication Quarterly, 28(1), 69-91
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Live-action Communication Design: A Technical How-To Video Case Study
2019 (English)In: Technical Communication Quarterly, ISSN 1057-2252, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 69-91Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This case study is based on a research through design project (RTD) that focuses on a technical communication video of the live-action format. It investigates the usability and design-implications of a live-action how-to video, by means of analyzing user-centered data such as YouTube analytics data, usability, and comprehension assessments. In the study, four key live-action video affordances are identified: verifiability, comparability, recordability, and visibility. The identification of these affordances when related to the users’ assessments resulted in several design implementations that would warrant sought-for communication efficacies. Findings show that some assumed efficacies appear to be mitigated by the complexity and the density of the video information. One implication of this is that the implementation of conventional video editing techniques and the addition of on-screen text that serve to make content briefer and more concise into instructional live-action videos requires the technical communicator’s careful consideration.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
Assessment, design of communication, digital technologies, knowledge management, research methods, usability studies, visual rhetoric/visualization techniques, Communication, Technical writing, Design implementation, Research through designs, Technical communications, Technical communicators
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-43056 (URN)10.1080/10572252.2018.1528388 (DOI)000470244700006 ()2-s2.0-85057256927 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-04-10 Created: 2019-04-10 Last updated: 2019-06-20Bibliographically approved
Gottlieb, L. & Eriksson, Y. (2019). Students' comprehension of design collaborations with external organizations. In: Proceedings of the 22nd International Conference on Engineering Design (ICED19): . Paper presented at 22nd International Conference on Engineering Design (ICED19) (pp. 579-588).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Students' comprehension of design collaborations with external organizations
2019 (English)In: Proceedings of the 22nd International Conference on Engineering Design (ICED19), 2019, p. 579-588Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This pilot study examines how design students comprehend collaborations with external organizations— the roles and involvement of different actors in a design process. The study looks at two undergraduate courses where a total of 33 design students collaborate with a municipality and governmental agency. Data focuses on the students' terminology in regard to the external organizations and is collected through questionnaires, voice recording, workshops and written assignments. The data analysis is both quantitative and qualitative, focusing on the word frequency and semantics of the terminology. The results show that the students were not used to working closely to external organizations. This is reflected in the prevalent use of the term "client" instead of "collaborative partner". Not working closely with organizations nor users is reflected in the students’ inabilities to handle the complexities that emerge when working with multiple stakeholder and users. At the end of the paper, suggestions are made of ways to develop students’ comprehension of ways to involve external organizations and users in the design process.

Keywords
Design education, Design process, User centred design
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Innovation and Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-45308 (URN)10.1017/dsi.2019.62 (DOI)2-s2.0-85079738518 (Scopus ID)
Conference
22nd International Conference on Engineering Design (ICED19)
Projects
MDH Living Lab
Available from: 2019-09-26 Created: 2019-09-26 Last updated: 2020-03-05Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, Y. & Sjölinder, M. (2019). The Role of Designers in the Development and Communication of New Technology. In: Sayago, Sergio (Ed.), Perspectives on Human-Computer Interaction Research with Older People: (pp. 37-48). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Role of Designers in the Development and Communication of New Technology
2019 (English)In: Perspectives on Human-Computer Interaction Research with Older People / [ed] Sayago, Sergio, Springer, 2019, p. 37-48Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Series
Human–Computer Interaction Series, ISSN 1571-5035
National Category
Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-46295 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-06076-3_3 (DOI)9783030060763 (ISBN)9783030060756 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-12-11 Created: 2019-12-11 Last updated: 2019-12-11Bibliographically approved
Eklund, C., Elfström, M., Eriksson, Y. & Söderlund, A. (2019). User experiences from a web-based, self-management programme: struggling with what I need when stress management is about me. European Journal of Physiotherapy, 39-48
Open this publication in new window or tab >>User experiences from a web-based, self-management programme: struggling with what I need when stress management is about me
2019 (English)In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, p. 39-48Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To explore users’ experiences of a tailored, interactive web application that supports behaviour change in stress management and to identify if and in that case what in the web-based programme that needed further development or adjustment to be feasible in a randomised controlled trial.

Method: The design of this study was explorative with a qualitative approach. Nine individuals were recruited among the staff at a university. Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted and analysed using qualitative content analysis, after the participants had completed the web-based stress management programme.

Results: One theme was identified, Struggling with what I need when stress management is about me, describing the paradox in having a programme that is perceived as supporting stress management while also being perceived as extensive and time consuming. The theme was divided in two categories: Defining the needs, where the users expressed what they needed from the programme and their everyday environment, to be able to use the programme, and It is about me, where the programme was described as helping the users understand their own stress.

Conclusion: The participants expressed acceptance of using a web-based programme for stress related problems. The perceived extensiveness of the programme must be considered in further development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2019
Keywords
stress management, behaviour change, behaviour medicine, content analysis, e-health
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Other Medical Sciences
Research subject
Care Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-40273 (URN)10.1080/21679169.2018.1468814 (DOI)000470063000008 ()2-s2.0-85046429289 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-07-20 Created: 2018-07-20 Last updated: 2019-11-11
Wlazlak, P., Eriksson, Y., Johansson, G. & Peter, A. (2019). Visual representations for communication in geographicallydistributed new product development projects. Journal of engineering design (Print), 30(8/9), 385-403
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Visual representations for communication in geographicallydistributed new product development projects
2019 (English)In: Journal of engineering design (Print), ISSN 0954-4828, E-ISSN 1466-1837, ISSN 0954-4828, Vol. 30, no 8/9, p. 385-403Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study addresses the role of visual representations in supporting communication between an R&D team and geographically distributed suppliers for a new product development (NPD) project. Itspecifically focuses on the design and use of visual representationsas a feasible way for communication between the distributed actorswhen they face communication challenges originating from differences in skills in the English language, but also from differences inwork experiences. Relying on empirical materials from a Swedishmanufacturing company in the mechanical engineering industry,this paper makes the following contributions to the literature. First,it shows that visual representations are effective boundary objectsable to support process-oriented and product-oriented communication in distributed NPD projects. Second, it illustrates that visualrepresentations do not necessarily have to follow graphic designprinciples, but can still be effective if distributed actors share thesame project context. Finally, it highlights the need for a dynamic andcontext-dependent perspective on communication in NPD projects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2019
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics Communication Studies
Research subject
Innovation and Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-45203 (URN)10.1080/09544828.2019.1661362 (DOI)000485984600001 ()2-s2.0-85072030679 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-09-12 Created: 2019-09-12 Last updated: 2020-02-20Bibliographically approved
Uggla, K. & Eriksson, Y. (2019). Visualization of Production Planning. In: Information Visualization: Biomedical Visualization and Geometric Modelling & Imaging. Paper presented at 2019 23rd International Conference Information Visualisation (IV), 2-5 July 2019, Paris, France (pp. 312-317).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Visualization of Production Planning
2019 (English)In: Information Visualization: Biomedical Visualization and Geometric Modelling & Imaging, 2019, p. 312-317Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The design of production planning tools is primarily based on conventions which can be found in research on visual perception and how data is traditionally represented. Standardized forms have become everyday tools and are an essential part of our visual culture. In the first part of the 20th century, the Gantt chart was introduced and was primarily used for charting workplace efficiency. It has been used in various forms ever since, in parallel with other Stage-Gate models. Visual management has been developed in companies that work with lean production systems. For governance and control of daily activities, a so-called lean board is used, which consists of a white board. In this paper we discuss how—despite rapid technological development and digitalization in many fields—our perceptions, visual representations, and organization of time seem to remain rooted in the past.

Keywords
visualization; time management; production planning; visual management
National Category
Engineering and Technology Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Innovation and Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-45090 (URN)10.1109/IV.2019.00059 (DOI)000507461900051 ()2-s2.0-85072289400 (Scopus ID)978-1-7281-2838-2 (ISBN)
Conference
2019 23rd International Conference Information Visualisation (IV), 2-5 July 2019, Paris, France
Available from: 2019-08-28 Created: 2019-08-28 Last updated: 2020-02-19Bibliographically approved
Lundin, J. & Eriksson, Y. (2018). An Investigation of Maintenance Technicians' Information-Seeking Behavior in a Repair Center. IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication, 61(3), 257-274
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Investigation of Maintenance Technicians' Information-Seeking Behavior in a Repair Center
2018 (English)In: IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication, ISSN 0361-1434, E-ISSN 1558-1500, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 257-274Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research problem: When it comes to understanding certain aspects of a maintenance technician's information-seeking behavior, knowledge is lacking. For instance, little is known about what kinds of information needs that maintenance technicians exhibit while performing work tasks and what types of sources they employ to satisfy those needs. Understanding such information-seeking behavior is especially essential for technical communicators who endeavor to design useful and relevant technical information. Research questions: 1. What information needs do maintenance technicians show evidence of while performing maintenance work tasks? 2. Where do they go to satisfy these information needs? Literature review: Current knowledge on maintenance technicians' information-seeking behavior is very limited. The literature reviewed for this study covers the task-based information-seeking behavior of different types of engineers and is mainly found within the field of library and information science research. This literature was selected because maintenance technicians and engineers share many characteristics. One information-seeking characteristic exhibited by engineers is the tendency to rely on internal company information, such as colleagues and self-created sources, before external information sources are consulted. Methodology: This study utilized an ethnographic research approach where empirical data were collected, analyzed, and interpreted from a theoretical viewpoint-a synthesis of Bystrom and Hansen's conceptual framework and the Systemic-Structural Theory of Activity. Seven in-house aftermarket maintenance technicians were observed via participant observation at a repair center in Sweden while they performed maintenance tasks on machines that had been taken out of service. Results and conclusions: The results-based on empirical data collected over the course of 12 days, spread over 12 weeks in the autumn of 2012-reveal that the observed maintenance technicians exhibited 50 different types of information needs. They seldom sought instructions covering an entire work task. Instead, to satisfy their information needs, the maintenance technicians consulted four types of sources that, in the present study, have been designated as information source hosts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE-INST ELECTRICAL ELECTRONICS ENGINEERS INC, 2018
Keywords
Documentation, information retrieval, information science, manuals, professional communication, search methods
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-40935 (URN)10.1109/TPC.2018.2826087 (DOI)000443049000003 ()2-s2.0-85047011374 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-13 Created: 2018-09-13 Last updated: 2019-12-17Bibliographically approved
Eklund, C., Elfström, M., Eriksson, Y. & Söderlund, A. (2018). Development of the web application My Stress Control—Integrating theories and existing evidence. Cogent Psychology, 5(1), 1-19
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of the web application My Stress Control—Integrating theories and existing evidence
2018 (English)In: Cogent Psychology, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To describe the systematic development of an evidence-based, tailored, interactive web application for self-management of work-related stress, and to test usability issues regarding how to proceed through the programme. Methods: Evidence from the fields of stress management, behaviour change and web-based interventions was the foundation for the theoretical framework and content. The next step was the development process of the web application and validation among experts and one possible end user. Last, a usability test with 14 possible end users was conducted. Results: The web-application, My Stress Control (MSC), was built on a solid theoretical framework. It consists of 12 modules including: introduction, psychoeducation, ambivalence, stress management strategies, lifestyle change, and maintenance. Self-monitoring, goal-setting, re-evaluating goals, feedback, and prompting formulation of intention to change are central techniques supporting behaviour change. The usability test revealed difficulties in understanding how to proceed through the programme. Conclusion: The development contributes to filling a gap in the literature regarding development of complex web-based interventions. MSC is dissimilar to existing programs in the field, considering the tailoring and multi-tracked opportunities. Although developed from the evidence in multiple fields, the web application would benefit from further development to support users in reaching the end module.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cogent OA, 2018
Keywords
behaviour change, health promotion, internet, occupational stress, stress management, stress prevention
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-40238 (URN)10.1080/23311908.2018.1489457 (DOI)000436962900001 ()2-s2.0-85049310511 (Scopus ID)
Funder
AFA Insurance, 130263
Available from: 2018-07-12 Created: 2018-07-12 Last updated: 2019-11-11
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9057-0063

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