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Lygnegård, F., Almqvist, L., Granlund, M. & Huus, K. (2019). Participation profiles in domestic life and peer relations as experienced by adolescents with and without impairments and long-term health conditions. Developmental Neurorehabilitation, 22(1), 27-38
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Participation profiles in domestic life and peer relations as experienced by adolescents with and without impairments and long-term health conditions
2019 (English)In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 27-38Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To investigate how individual and environmental factors relate to self-reported participation profiles in adolescents with and without impairments or long-term health conditions. Methods: A person-oriented approach (hierarchical cluster analysis) was used to identify cluster groups of individuals sharing participation patterns in the outcome variables frequency perceived importance in domestic life and peer relations. Cluster groups were compared using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results: A nine-cluster solution was chosen. All clusters included adolescents with impairment and long-term health conditions. Perceived importance of peer relations was more important than frequent attendance in domestic-life activities. Frequency of participation in dialogues and family interaction patterns seemed to affect the participation profiles more than factors related to body functions. Conclusion: Type of impairment or long-term health condition is a weaker determinant of membership in clusters depicting frequency and perceived importance in domestic life or peer relations than dialogue and family environment.

Keywords
Participation pattern; everyday functioning; ICFCY; person-oriented method; cluster analysis
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Health Sciences
Research subject
Care Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-37997 (URN)10.1080/17518423.2018.1424266 (DOI)000456885100005 ()29313401 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85040965252 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-01-10 Created: 2018-01-10 Last updated: 2019-02-14Bibliographically approved
Fritz, J., Söderlund, A., Wallin, L., Almqvist, L. & Sandborgh, M. (2018). THE EFFECT OF FACILITATION WHEN IMPLEMENTING A BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE APPROACH IN PHYSICAL THERAPY PRIMARY HEALTH CARE. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 25, S38-S38
Open this publication in new window or tab >>THE EFFECT OF FACILITATION WHEN IMPLEMENTING A BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE APPROACH IN PHYSICAL THERAPY PRIMARY HEALTH CARE
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 25, p. S38-S38Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER, 2018
National Category
Physiotherapy Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-41223 (URN)000446532700125 ()
Available from: 2018-10-25 Created: 2018-10-25 Last updated: 2018-10-25Bibliographically approved
Andersson, A. K., Martin, L., Strand Brodd, K. & Almqvist, L. (2017). Childrens and parents percpetions of everyday functioning in preschool children born preterm. In: : . Paper presented at P3M 2017 - Motives, methods, measures. CeDDR, Australian Catholic university, Melbourne, AUS, March 2017..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Childrens and parents percpetions of everyday functioning in preschool children born preterm
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Health Sciences
Research subject
Care Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-36479 (URN)
Conference
P3M 2017 - Motives, methods, measures. CeDDR, Australian Catholic university, Melbourne, AUS, March 2017.
Available from: 2017-09-20 Created: 2017-09-20 Last updated: 2018-03-05Bibliographically approved
Sjöman, M., Granlund, M. & Almqvist, L. (2017). Engagement both as a means and an end, a transactional analysis. In: : . Paper presented at P3M 2017 - Motives, methods, measures. CeDDR. Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, AUS, March 2017..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Engagement both as a means and an end, a transactional analysis
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Psychology Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-36476 (URN)
Conference
P3M 2017 - Motives, methods, measures. CeDDR. Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, AUS, March 2017.
Available from: 2017-09-20 Created: 2017-09-20 Last updated: 2018-10-18Bibliographically approved
Göransson, K., Lindqvist, G., Mollas, G., Almqvist, L. & Nilholm, C. (2017). Ideas about occupational roles and inclusive practices among special needs educators and support teachers in Sweden. Educational review (Birmingham), 69(4), 490-505
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ideas about occupational roles and inclusive practices among special needs educators and support teachers in Sweden
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2017 (English)In: Educational review (Birmingham), ISSN 0013-1911, E-ISSN 1465-3397, Vol. 69, no 4, p. 490-505Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Special needs educators (SNEs) and their counterparts are expected to play a significant role in schools' work towards inclusive practices. Studies do, however, indicate a rather diversified picture regarding the occupational groups assigned to work with special support and their workroles, within and between different countries. In Sweden, one can differentiate between two such occupational groups, SNEs with qualifications in special educational needs at advanced level and support teachers (SuTs) with varying teacher education and education in special educational needs. The aims of this article are to investigate the occurrence of SNEs and SuTs within the compulsory school system in 10 municipalities in Sweden and the occupational roles of those SNEs and SuTs in relation to the inclusion agenda. A questionnaire was sent out in 2012 to all SNEs and SuTs in 10 municipalities (n = 511, response rate 61.6%). Main results indicate that: (a) there is wide variation between municipalities regarding the extent to which SNEs or SuTs are assigned to work with special support; (b) the characteristics of the occupational role of SNEs are more in line with inclusive practices than those of the role of SuTs; (c) there is consensus between the two occupational groups regarding what they think should characterize the occupational role of SNEs; (d) SNEs consider, more than do the SuTs themselves, that the role of SuTs should be more in line with that of a traditional special-education teacher. Results are discussed in relation to Thomas Skrtic's theoretical accounts of inclusive education and Andrew Abbott's notion of jurisdictional control.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2017
Keywords
Special needs educators, support teachers, jurisdictional control, occupational roles, inclusion, work tasks
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-35791 (URN)10.1080/00131911.2016.1237477 (DOI)000402077900006 ()2-s2.0-84991492593 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-06-15 Created: 2017-06-15 Last updated: 2018-10-17Bibliographically approved
Fritz, J., Söderlund, A., Almqvist, L., Wallin, L. & Sandborgh, M. (2017). Implementation of a behavioural medicine approach in physiotherapy – a process evaluation.. In: World Confederation of Physical Therapy (WCPT) Congress, Cape Town, South Africa, 2-4 July, 2017.: . Paper presented at World Confederation of Physical Therapy (WCPT) Congress, Cape Town, South Africa, 2-4 July, 2017..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Implementation of a behavioural medicine approach in physiotherapy – a process evaluation.
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2017 (English)In: World Confederation of Physical Therapy (WCPT) Congress, Cape Town, South Africa, 2-4 July, 2017., 2017Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background: A behavioural medicine approach in physiotherapy for patients with persistent musculoskeletal pain is recommended based on evidence. The approach aims at an individually tailored treatment targeting motor behaviour, cognition, disability and active patient involvement. The behavioural medicine approach is complex and it is challenging in implementation to achieve clinically relevant behaviours in physiotherapy. Process evaluation is an essential part of designing and testing implementation interventions to improve the quality of the implementation. However, studies evaluating the implementation process of a behavioural medicine approach in physiotherapy are sparse.

Purpose: To explore the implementation process of a behavioural medicine approach in physiotherapy.

Methods: Qualitative and quantitative methods were used. 15 physiotherapists working in six primary health care units were consecutively included. A theory based implementation intervention was tailored to the participating individual physiotherapists. Active and multifaceted implementation strategies were used during a total of seven days spread over a six months implementation period. The main implementation strategies were external facilitation and peer-learning. Ten two-hours outreach sessions were offered to each unit. The physiotherapists were encouraged to use individual goal setting and video recordings of treatment sessions to facilitate feedback and reflection during the sessions with the external facilitator. Process data were collected using semi-structured interviews, self-reports of time allocation for different implementation strategies and documented individual goals. Qualitative content analysis and quantitative frequency scorings were used for data analyses.

Results: In median the physiotherapists participated in 9 (3-10) out of 10 sessions with the external facilitator. Discussing clinical experiences of the behavioural medicine approach together with the external facilitator was perceived as valuable. These discussions stimulated reflection and problem solving, and was also experienced as a reminder for practicing skills in behavioural medicine. Video recordings of treatment sessions were used by ten of the physiotherapists at 17 out of 57 possible sessions. Video recordings were experienced as too complicated to use in relation to the gains. Lack of time was also considered as a barrier for using video recordings. Individual goal-setting from one session to the next with the external facilitator was frequently used by all the participants. Relevant skills for the goals were practiced in between the sessions. However, goal setting was not considered important by the physiotherapists. In median the physiotherapists spent 3.25 (0-9.5) hours for peer discussions. Peer discussions were a strategy that the physiotherapists wanted to continue with, even after the implementation intervention period. Even though the physiotherapists had permission from the manager to spend time on the implementation intervention, it was challenging for the physiotherapists to prioritize the implementation intervention before patient care.

Conclusion(s): External facilitation and peer discussions were perceived as important strategies for stimulating practice of behavioural medicine skills in physiotherapy. Further, peer discussions could stimulate sustainability of the implementation. The physiotherapists needed support to use the designated time for the implementation.

Implications: Quantitative and qualitative analyses of the implementation process is useful for understanding the mechanisms of impact for the implementation intervention, how outcomes were achieved and for future replications.

Keywords
behavioural medicine, physical therapy, implementation, process evaluation
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-41203 (URN)
Conference
World Confederation of Physical Therapy (WCPT) Congress, Cape Town, South Africa, 2-4 July, 2017.
Funder
AFA Insurance, 12169
Available from: 2018-10-21 Created: 2018-10-21 Last updated: 2018-10-24Bibliographically approved
Samuels, A., Granlund, M., Adair, B., Raghavendra, P., Almqvist, L. & Dada, S. (2017). Longitudinal studies on change in activities and participation: A systematic review. In: : . Paper presented at P3M 2017 - Motives, methods, measures. CeDDR, Australian Catholic university, March 2017..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Longitudinal studies on change in activities and participation: A systematic review
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2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-36477 (URN)
Conference
P3M 2017 - Motives, methods, measures. CeDDR, Australian Catholic university, March 2017.
Available from: 2017-09-20 Created: 2017-09-20 Last updated: 2017-10-25Bibliographically approved
Andersson, A. K., Martin, L., Strand Brodd, K. & Almqvist, L. (2017). Patterns of everyday functioning in preschool children born preterm and at term. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 67, 82-93
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patterns of everyday functioning in preschool children born preterm and at term
2017 (English)In: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 67, p. 82-93Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background/Aim Children born preterm are at risk of neonatal complications but the long-term consequences for everyday functioning is not well known. The study aimed to identify patterns of everyday functioning in preschool children born preterm and at term in relation to perinatal data, neonatal risk factors, behaviour, and socioeconomic status. Registry data and data from parent rated questionnaires were collected for 331 children. Method A person-oriented approach with a cluster analysis was used. Results A seven cluster solution explained 65.91% of the variance. Most children (n = 232) showed patterns of strong everyday functioning. A minority of the children (n = 99), showed diverse patterns of weak everyday functioning. Perinatal characteristics, neonatal risk factors and socio-economics did not predict cluster group membership. Children born preterm were represented in all clusters. Conclusion, implications Most preschool children are perceived by their parents with strong everyday functioning despite being born preterm. However small groups of children are, for various reasons, perceived with weak functioning, but preterm birth is not the sole contributor to patterns of weak everyday functioning. More critical for all children's everyday functioning is probably the interaction between individual factors, behavioural factors and contextual factors. To gain a broader understanding of children's everyday functioning. Child Health Services need to systematically consider aspects of body function, activity and in addition participation and environmental aspects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Inc., 2017
Keywords
Child development, Children born preterm, Cluster analysis, Everyday functioning, Person-oriented research
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-36101 (URN)10.1016/j.ridd.2017.06.005 (DOI)000405975900009 ()28651224 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85021255293 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-07-12 Created: 2017-07-12 Last updated: 2018-10-25Bibliographically approved
Castro, S., Granlund, M. & Almqvist, L. (2017). The relationship between classroom quality-related variables and engagement levels in Swedish preschool classrooms: a longitudinal study. European Early Childhood Education Research Journal, 25(1), 122-135
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The relationship between classroom quality-related variables and engagement levels in Swedish preschool classrooms: a longitudinal study
2017 (English)In: European Early Childhood Education Research Journal, ISSN 1350-293X, E-ISSN 1752-1807, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 122-135Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Child engagement has been defined as active participation in classroom routines, appropriate interactions with the environment and it also predicts academic achievement. Therefore, it is necessary to identify predictors of engagement over time. Moreover, cross-cultural data is needed to provide a global picture of the quality of Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) across countries. This study aims to describe the quality of Swedish preschool classrooms and its relationship with students' engagement over time. Data was collected from 165 preschool teachers in 55 preschool units in Sweden. Results show that all classroom-related variables (Emotional Support, Instructional Support and Classroom Organisation) have increased levels over time, while engagement remained stable. Three groups of preschool classroom units were identified with similar patterns of classroom quality over time (higher emotional support and lower instructional practice) and similar differences in level. Emotional Support was found to be the best predictor of student engagement over time.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2017
Keywords
Engagement, Sweden, preschool, Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS), quality
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-35129 (URN)10.1080/1350293X.2015.1102413 (DOI)000396583500009 ()2-s2.0-84946434700 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-04-06 Created: 2017-04-06 Last updated: 2018-10-17Bibliographically approved
Andersson, A. K., Martin, L., Strand Brodd, K. & Almqvist, L. (2016). Predictors for everyday functioning in preschool children born preterm and at term. Early Human Development, 103, 147-153
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predictors for everyday functioning in preschool children born preterm and at term
2016 (English)In: Early Human Development, ISSN 0378-3782, E-ISSN 1872-6232, Vol. 103, p. 147-153Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-33348 (URN)10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2016.09.011 (DOI)000390973300026 ()27685465 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84988723410 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-10-06 Created: 2016-10-06 Last updated: 2018-10-16Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5904-1390

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