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Manasatchakun, P., Roxberg, Å. & Asp, M. (2018). Conceptions of healthy ageing held by relatives of older people in Isan-Thai culture: A phenomenographic study. Journal of Aging Research, Article ID 3734645.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conceptions of healthy ageing held by relatives of older people in Isan-Thai culture: A phenomenographic study
2018 (English)In: Journal of Aging Research, ISSN 2090-2204, E-ISSN 2090-2212, article id 3734645Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Healthy ageing has been studied in various contexts. However, no studies have focused on healthy ageing from the perspective of children or grandchildren, who are the main informal caregivers for older people in northeast Thailand, also referred to as the Isan region. Therefore, this study aimed to describe the conceptions of healthy ageing harboured by children and grandchildren caring for older people in northeast Thailand. A qualitative descriptive design was performed using a phenomenographic approach with an epistemological basis in the lifeworld theory to understand the varying conceptions of healthy ageing based on participants’ lived experience. We conducted in-depth interviews comprising open-ended questions to gain an understanding of the conceptions of healthy ageing held by 14 children and grandchildren of older persons in northeast Thailand. The data collected during these interviews were analysed using the phenomenographic analysis method. The results of our analysis indicated that the conceptions of healthy ageing can be categorized into the following four descriptive categories: being independent, not being afflicted by diseases or illnesses, being a giver and a receiver, and being wise. These findings highlight that healthy ageing entails autonomy, interdependence and wisdom and emphasize the importance of holistic view on the meaning of healthy ageing. Healthcare providers should understand the different meanings of healthy ageing from the perspectives of children and grandchildren of older people and integrate their perspectives when collaborating with them to promote healthy ageing. The findings of this study may facilitate further research and ensure the provision of support to the relatives of older people to promote healthy ageing in northeast Thailand. 

Keywords
healthy ageing, health promotion, older people, qualitative research, relatives
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-34557 (URN)10.1155/2018/3734645 (DOI)2-s2.0-85045911896 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-12-28 Created: 2016-12-28 Last updated: 2018-05-11Bibliographically approved
Asp, M. (2017). Editorial, SJCS September 2017 issue: NCCS in the past and for the future. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 31(3), 425-426
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Editorial, SJCS September 2017 issue: NCCS in the past and for the future
2017 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 425-426Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2017
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-38241 (URN)10.1111/scs.12530 (DOI)2-s2.0-85030642042 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-01-24 Created: 2018-01-24 Last updated: 2018-01-24Bibliographically approved
Asp, M., Simonsson, B., Peter, L. & Molarius, A. (2017). Physical mobility, physical activity, and obesity among elderly: findings from a large population-based Swedish survey. Public Health, 147, 84-91
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical mobility, physical activity, and obesity among elderly: findings from a large population-based Swedish survey
2017 (English)In: Public Health, ISSN 0033-3506, E-ISSN 1476-5616, Vol. 147, p. 84-91Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To examine how physical activity and physical mobility are related to obesity in the elderly. Study design: A cross-sectional study of 2558 men and women aged 65 years and older who participated in a population survey in 2012 was conducted in mid-Sweden with an overall response rate of 67%. Methods: Obesity (body mass index >= 30 kg/m(2)) was based on self-reported weight and height, and physical activity and physical mobility on questionnaire data. Chi-squared test and multiple logistic regressions were used as statistical analyses. Results: The overall prevalence of obesity was 19% in women and 15% in men and decreased after the age of 75 years. A strong association between both physical activity and obesity, and physical mobility and obesity was found. The odds for obesity were higher for impaired physical mobility (odds ratio [OR] 2.83, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.14-3.75) than for physical inactivity (OR 1.63, 95% CI 1.28-2.08) when adjusted for gender, age, socio-economic status and fruit and vegetable intake. However, physical activity was associated with obesity only among elderly with physical mobility but not among those with impaired physical mobility. Conclusion: It is important to focus on making it easier for elderly with physical mobility to become or stay physically active, whereas elderly with impaired physical mobility have a higher prevalence of obesity irrespective of physical activity.

National Category
Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-36248 (URN)10.1016/j.puhe.2017.01.032 (DOI)000405833500015 ()2-s2.0-85015448492 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-08-17 Created: 2017-08-17 Last updated: 2018-01-24Bibliographically approved
Sellin, L., Asp, M., Wallsten, T. & Wiklund Gustin, L. (2017). Reconnecting with oneself while struggling between life and death: The phenomenon of recovery as experienced by persons at risk of suicide. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 26(2), 200-207
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reconnecting with oneself while struggling between life and death: The phenomenon of recovery as experienced by persons at risk of suicide
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 200-207Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The body of knowledge regarding health and recovery as experienced by patients at risk of suicide is limited. More research is needed into the meaning of recovery and what strengthens the desire to live. The aim of this study was to describe the phenomenon of recovery in a context of nursing care as experienced by persons at risk of suicide. In line with a reflective lifeworld research approach, 14 patients from a psychiatric clinic in Sweden participated in phenomenon-oriented interviews. Data were analyzed to describe the essence of the phenomenon. The results reveal that the phenomenon of recovery means ‘reconnecting with oneself while struggling between life and death’. Three meaning constituents emerged: being in an expressive space and giving voice to oneself, regaining dignity through nurturing connectedness, and finding a balance in the tension between life and death. In conclusion, the meaning of recovery is to experience the ability to manage one's own life. Professional caregivers need to acknowledge patients' lifeworlds, in a way that enable patients to experience themselves as capable of managing their own lives. Professional caregivers should also facilitate the involvement of supportive relatives.

Keywords
attempted suicide, mental health nursing, phenomenology, psychiatry, recovery
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Care Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-32590 (URN)10.1111/inm.12249 (DOI)000398124700011 ()2-s2.0-84994071505 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-09-06 Created: 2016-08-19 Last updated: 2018-01-09Bibliographically approved
Asp, M., Simonsson, B., Larm, P. & Molarius, A. (2017). The association between physical activity and obesity differs by physical mobility among elderly. European Journal of Public Health, 27(Supplement: 3)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The association between physical activity and obesity differs by physical mobility among elderly
2017 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 27, no Supplement: 3Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OXFORD UNIV PRESS, 2017
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-37456 (URN)000414389804173 ()
Available from: 2017-12-14 Created: 2017-12-14 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
Sellin, L., Asp, M., Kumlin, T., Wallsten, T. & Wiklund Gustin, L. (2017). To be present, share and nurture: a lifeworld phenomenological study of relatives' participation in the suicidal person's recovery. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 12, Article ID 1287985.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>To be present, share and nurture: a lifeworld phenomenological study of relatives' participation in the suicidal person's recovery
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2017 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 12, article id 1287985Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In today's health care, participation is acknowledged as important. However, there is limited research on how relatives of patients at risk of suicide experience their opportunities to participate in care during periods when their close ones are subject to inpatient care. The aim of this study was to describe the phenomenon of participation, as experienced by relatives of persons who are subject to inpatient psychiatric care due to a risk of suicide. The study was conducted through a reflective lifeworld research (RLR) approach, based on phenomenological philosophy. Eight relatives of patients receiving care from professionals in a psychiatric specialist health care context in Sweden participated in phenomenon-oriented interviews. Data were analysed to elucidate a meaning structure of the phenomenon. The findings show that the phenomenon of participation was more associated with patients' recovery processes than with the caring process, and means "being actively involved in a process in which the person regains the desire to live". The meaning of participation is further described by its meaning constituents: struggling for being able to be present for the person at risk of suicide, being able to share everyday life, and nurturing sources for vitality. These insights into the meaning of participation highlight the importance of allowing supportive relatives to be a part of the patient's life, while the person is cared for in an inpatient hospital setting. Thus, participation enables relatives to be acknowledged as resourceful human beings in the patient's recovery process, and thereby facilitates a sense of being able to manage and share life itself together with the person. This means that mental health nurses need to recognize individual variations of relatives' participation processes, and take on the responsibility of acknowledging relatives' lifeworlds.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2017
Keywords
Caring science, interpersonal relationships, lived body, mental health nursing, person-centred care, phenomenology, psychiatry, relatives' experiences, suicidality, vitality
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-35130 (URN)000396166400001 ()28245364 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85027697273 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-04-06 Created: 2017-04-06 Last updated: 2017-11-09Bibliographically approved
Manasatchakun, P., Chotiga, P., Hochwälder, J., Roxberg, Å., Sandborgh, M. & Asp, M. (2016). Factors Associated with Healthy Aging among Older Persons in Northeastern Thailand. Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology, 31(4), 369-384
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Factors Associated with Healthy Aging among Older Persons in Northeastern Thailand
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology, ISSN 0169-3816, E-ISSN 1573-0719, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 369-384Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to describe factors associated with perceived health and healthy aging among older people in northeastern Thailand. Thailand’s aging population is growing and facing an increasing old-age dependency ratio. Northeastern Thailand, known as Isan, is a region in which the number of older residents is projected to grow rapidly. Older people in this region are likely to confront great threats to their health and well-being. These issues require appropriate attention and actions to promote healthy aging. However, healthy aging in this region has not been studied. A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 453 older people, aged 60 years or older. Participants completed the Healthy Aging Instrument (HAI) and provided relevant demographic characteristics. Mann-Whitney U tests, Kruskal-Wallis tests and multiple regression models were used to analyze the data. Through comparative analyses, significant differences in HAI scores were observed for the following factors: marital status, residential area, disability, income level, and perceived meaningfulness in life. In the multiple regression models, residential area, disability, and marital status explained 24.30 % of the variance in HAI scores. Health promotion strategies and future targeted intervention programs should consider the importance of these factors. 

Keywords
Cross-sectional study, Healthy aging, Northeastern Thailand, Older persons
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-32517 (URN)10.1007/s10823-016-9296-y (DOI)000408865400003 ()27432370 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84978718906 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-08-18 Created: 2016-08-18 Last updated: 2017-09-14Bibliographically approved
Manasatchakun, P., Chotiga, P., Roxberg, Å. & Asp, M. (2016). Healthy ageing in Isan-Thai culture-A phenomenographic study based on older persons' lived experiences. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 11, Article ID 29463.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Healthy ageing in Isan-Thai culture-A phenomenographic study based on older persons' lived experiences
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11, article id 29463Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [sv]

Healthy ageing is a concept that concerns older persons' quality of life and is a key factor in promoting well-being. The older population in Thailand is growing. Isan (a region of north-eastern Thailand) has been reported as having one of the most rapidly increasing older populations in the country. In order to care for and promote the health of older people, healthcare providers should understand how healthy ageing is perceived by this target group. Although healthy ageing has been studied in different contexts as well as perspectives, no studies have previously focused on older persons' experiences of healthy ageing from a lifeworld perspective in Isan-Thai. Therefore, the aim of this study is to describe older persons' qualitatively different conceptions of healthy ageing in Isan-Thai culture. A phenomenographic approach with an epistemological base in lifeworld theory was used to disclose the various ways to conceptualize healthy ageing. Individual, qualitative interviews were conducted with 17 people aged 60 and above who live in Isan-Thai. The findings of this study revealed three categories of descriptions: "being independent in dependence,'' "being at peace,'' and "being a valuable person.'' This study also found family members, friends, healthcare providers, and religion important to healthy ageing in the Isan-Thai culture. Understanding how older people conceptualize healthy ageing is valuable for healthcare providers. They can apply these findings regarding healthy ageing in their fieldwork when caring for older people.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-31430 (URN)10.3402/qhw.v11.29463 (DOI)000372205200001 ()26960686 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84962295859 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-04-14 Created: 2016-04-14 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Palesjö, C., Nordgren, L. & Asp, M. (2015). Being in a critical illness-recovery process: a phenomenological hermenetical study. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 24(23-24), 3494-3502
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Being in a critical illness-recovery process: a phenomenological hermenetical study
2015 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 24, no 23-24, p. 3494-3502Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims and objective. The aim of this study was to describe and interpret the essential meaning of the lived experiences of being in a critical illness-recovery process after a life-threatening condition. 

Background. The critical illness-recovery process after a life-threatening condition takes several years and does not only include patients' experiences during intensive care. Previous research has mainly focused on what critically ill patients recall. However, from a phenomenological point of view, experiences are more than memories alone. To plan and perform relevant health care and social support for patients who have survived a life-threatening condition, a more profound understanding about their lived experiences is needed. 

Design and method. In this qualitative study, a phenomenological hermeneutical approach was used. Interviews were conducted with seven patients, two to four years after they had received care in an intensive care unit in Sweden. 

Results. The comprehensive understanding of the results shows that the critical illness-recovery process after a life-threatening condition means an existential struggle to reconcile with an unfamiliar body and with ordinary life. This can be understood as an 'unhomelikeness' implying a struggle to create meaning and coherence from scary and fragmented memories. The previous life projects, such as work and social life become unfamiliar when the patient's fragile and weak body is disobedient and brings on altered sensations. 

Conclusions. Patients who survive a life-threatening condition have an immense need for care and support during the entire critical illness-recoveryprocess, and also after the initial acute phase. They need a coherent understanding of what happened, and support to be able to perform their changed life projects. 

Relevance to clinical practice. Supporting and caring for patients' recovery from a life-threatening condition involves recognising the patients' struggle and responding to their existential concerns.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Health Sciences
Research subject
Care Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-30739 (URN)10.1111/jocn.13002 (DOI)000368277900017 ()2-s2.0-84976553382 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-01-18 Created: 2016-01-18 Last updated: 2018-01-26Bibliographically approved
Asp, M. (2015). Rest: A Health-Related phenomenon and concept in Caring Science. Global Qualitative Nursing Research, 2, Article ID 2333393615583663.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rest: A Health-Related phenomenon and concept in Caring Science
2015 (English)In: Global Qualitative Nursing Research, ISSN 2333-3936, Vol. 2, article id 2333393615583663Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Rest is a health-related phenomenon. Researchers have explored the phenomenon of rest, but further concept development is recommended. The aim of my study was to develop and describe a concept of rest, from interviews with a total of 63 participants about their lived experiences of rest. I performed the developing process in two stages: first with descriptive phenomenology and second with a hermeneutic approach. The concept of rest is comprised of the essences of both rest and “non-rest,” and there is a current movement between these two conditions in peoples’ lives. The essence of rest is being in harmony in motivation, feeling, and action. The essence of non-rest is being in disharmony in motivation, feeling, and action. The essences reveal some meaning constituents. Health care professionals and researchers can use the concept as a frame of reference in health care praxis and in applied research.

Keywords
caring, concept development, Gadamer, Health and Wellbeing, hermeneutics, lived experiences, Merleau-Ponty, nursing, phenomenology
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Health Sciences
Research subject
Care Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-30741 (URN)10.1177/2333393615583663 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-01-18 Created: 2016-01-18 Last updated: 2018-01-26Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3307-6779

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