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von Heideken Wågert, Petra, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6292-7010
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Publications (10 of 53) Show all publications
Fritz, J., von Heideken Wågert, P., Gusdal, A. K., Johansson-Pajala, R.-M. & Eklund, C. (2024). Determinants of Implementing an Information and Communication Technology Tool for Social Interaction Among Older People: Qualitative Content Analysis of Social Services Personnel Perspectives. JMIR Aging, 7(1), Article ID e43999.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Determinants of Implementing an Information and Communication Technology Tool for Social Interaction Among Older People: Qualitative Content Analysis of Social Services Personnel Perspectives
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2024 (English)In: JMIR Aging, E-ISSN 2561-7605, Vol. 7, no 1, article id e43999Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Older people are particularly vulnerable to social isolation and loneliness, which can lead to ill-health, both mentally and physically. Information and communication technology (ICT) can supplement health and social care and improve health among the vulnerable, older adult population. When ICT is used specifically for communication with others, it is associated with reduced loneliness in older populations. Research is sparse on how the implementation of ICT, used specifically for communication among older people in social services, can be performed. It is recommended to consider the determinants of implementation, that is, barriers to and facilitators of implementation. Determinants related to older people using ICT tools are reported in several studies. To the best of our knowledge, studies investigating the determinants related to the social services perspective are lacking. Objective: This study aims to explore the determinants of implementing the Fik@ room, a new, co-designed, and research-based ICT tool for social interaction among older people, from a social services personnel perspective. Methods: This study used an exploratory, qualitative design. An ICT tool called the Fik@ room was tested in an intervention study conducted in 2021 in 2 medium-sized municipalities in Sweden. Informants in this study were municipal social services personnel with experience of implementing this specific ICT tool in social services. We conducted a participatory workshop consisting of 2 parts, with 9 informants divided into 2 groups. We analyzed the data using qualitative content analysis with an inductive approach. Results: The results included 7 categories of determinants for implementing the ICT tool. Being able to introduce the ICT tool in an appropriate manner concerns the personnel’s options for introducing and supporting the ICT tool, including their competencies in using digital equipment. Organizational structure concerns a structure for communication within the organization. Leadership concerns engagement and enthusiasm as driving forces for implementation. The digital maturity of the social services personnel concerns the personnel’s skills and attitudes toward using digital equipment. Resources concern time and money. IT support concerns accessibility, and legal liability concerns possibilities to fulfill legal responsibilities. Conclusions: The results show that implementation involves an entire organization at varying degrees. Regardless of how much each level within the organization comes into direct contact with the ICT tool, all levels need to be involved to create the necessary conditions for successful implementation. The prerequisites for the implementation of an ICT tool will probably change depending on the digital maturity of future generations. As this study only included 9 informants, the results should be handled with care. The study was performed during the COVID-19 pandemic, which has probably affected the results.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
JMIR Publications Inc., 2024
Keywords
barriers, determinants, digitalization, facilitators, implementation, information and communication technology, loneliness, older people, organization, social isolation
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-66245 (URN)10.2196/43999 (DOI)001183166400001 ()38407955 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85186600830 (Scopus ID)
Note

Article; Export Date: 13 March 2024; Cited By: 0; Correspondence Address: J. Fritz; School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Box 883 Västerås, 721 23, Sweden; email: johanna.fritz@mdu.se

Available from: 2024-03-13 Created: 2024-03-13 Last updated: 2024-03-27Bibliographically approved
Henriksson, A., Elfström, M., Söderlund, A. & von Heideken Wågert, P. (2024). Exploring sedentary behavior during neo- or adjuvant treatment in patients with cancer: A phenomenological study. European Journal of Oncology Nursing, 70, Article ID 102556.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring sedentary behavior during neo- or adjuvant treatment in patients with cancer: A phenomenological study
2024 (English)In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 70, article id 102556Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Increased sedentary behavior during cancer treatment is common, which may have negative long-term health effects. Understanding patients' experience of sedentary behavior during neo- or adjuvant cancer treatment may be crucial in developing effective support for patients to reduce sedentary behavior. Therefore, the present study aimed to explore sedentary behavior in patients undergoing neo- or adjuvant cancer treatment. Methods: Eleven interviews were conducted with patients undergoing treatment for breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer. Participants were recruited from a university hospital in Sweden. Interviews were analyzed phenomenologically, and the results were presented as descriptions of the phenomenon sedentary behavior. Results: The overarching theme of sedentary behavior during cancer treatment was that sedentary behavior is experienced through being physically active or not. Furthermore, experiences of sedentary behavior increased with side effects and varied depending on the type and phase of cancer treatment, meaning that sedentary behavior is an adjustment to side effects. Additionally, sedentary behavior was influenced by life circumstances and social interaction, such as work status and having social support. Finally, sedentary behavior is influenced by strategies and motivations, such as the perceived benefits of physical activity and self-image. Conclusions: Sedentary behavior is difficult for patients to discern, which is why health care personnel may need to help patients by increasing awareness of the negative impact of sedentary behavior in a way that does not stigmatize patients. Furthermore, developing support that targets periods with more side effects and helping patients reduce sedentary behavior throughout changing life circumstances may be helpful.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2024
Keywords
Breast cancer, Colorectal cancer, Experience, Phenomenology, Prostate cancer, Sedentary behavior
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-66507 (URN)10.1016/j.ejon.2024.102556 (DOI)001232003400001 ()38636117 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85190429524 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-04-25 Created: 2024-04-25 Last updated: 2024-06-05Bibliographically approved
Carnesten, H., von Heideken Wågert, P., Wiklund Gustin, L., Toivanen, S., Skoglund, K., Jaarsma, T. & Andreae, C. (2024). Struggling in the dehumanized world of COVID—An exploratory mixed‐methods study of frontline healthcare workers' experiences. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 1-15
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Struggling in the dehumanized world of COVID—An exploratory mixed‐methods study of frontline healthcare workers' experiences
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2024 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Aim

To explore healthcare workers' experiences of the changed caring reality during the COVID-19 pandemic in Sweden.DesignAn online fully mixed-methods design.MethodsA web-based self-reported questionnaire with fixed and open-ended answers collected data from March to April 2021, analysed in three steps. First, free-text questions were analysed by qualitative content analysis. Then quantitative linear regression analyses using models covering stress and coping mechanisms were conducted. Finally, a meta-inference of qualitative and quantitative data emerged a new comprehensive understanding. The COREQ guidelines were used for reporting.

Results

Meta-inferenced results of quantitative and qualitative findings show the pandemic was a traumatic experience for healthcare workers. Main theme; When work became a frightening experience in a dehumanized reality, comprised four themes: Entering unprepared into a frightful, incomprehensible world; Sacrificing moral values and harbouring dilemmas in isolation; Lack of clear management; and Reorient in togetherness and find meaning in a changed reality. Qualitative results comprised four categories; Working in a dehumanized world; Living in betrayal of ones' own conscience; Lack of structure in a chaotic time and Regaining vitality together. Subdimensions comprehensibility and meaningfulness were associated significantly with post-traumatic stress disorder in multiple regression analysis. In multiple regression analysis, sense of coherence was the most prominent coping strategy.

Conclusions

Forcing oneself to perform beyond one's limit, sacrificing moral values and lacking management was a traumatic experience to healthcare workers during the pandemic. Reorienting as a way of coping was possible in togetherness with colleagues. There is an urgency of interventions to meet the needs among healthcare workers who took on a frontline role during the COVID-19 pandemic and to prevent mental health illness in future crisis.

National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-65889 (URN)10.1111/jan.16083 (DOI)001155994100001 ()2-s2.0-85184195479 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-02-05 Created: 2024-02-05 Last updated: 2024-04-10Bibliographically approved
Carnesten, H., Wiklund Gustin, L., Skoglund, K. & von Heideken Wågert, P. (2023). Caring through barriers—Newly graduated registered nurses' lived experiences in emergency departments during the COVID-19 pandemic. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 79(6), 2269-2279
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Caring through barriers—Newly graduated registered nurses' lived experiences in emergency departments during the COVID-19 pandemic
2023 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 79, no 6, p. 2269-2279Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To illuminate the meaning of newly graduated registered nurses' experiences of caring for patients in emergency departments during the COVID-19 pandemic. Design: A phenomenological hermeneutical study guided by Lindseth and Norberg. Methods: In-depth one-on-one interviews with 14 nurses from five hospitals were conducted from March to November 2020 and analysed using thematic analysis. The consolidated criteria for reporting qualitative research (COREQ) were used as the reporting guideline. Results: The findings comprise one main theme Caring through barriers and three themes with sub-themes. In the first theme, having intention to care, participants revealed their dedication to care for patients during the pandemic despite extensive stress, little experience and skills. The second theme, with tied hands in human suffering, illuminates experiences of being disconnected from the patient, overwhelmed by responsibility and unable to relieve suffering. The third theme, feeling inadequate, reveals experiences of lack of support and doubts meaning less space to develop into the nurse one wants to be. Conclusion: Findings reveal a new understanding of new nurses' experiences during times of crisis. The essence of caring in the emergency department during the pandemic can be explained as mediated through spatial, temporal and emotional barriers preventing new nurses from providing holistic care. Impact: The results may be used as anticipatory guidance for new nurses and inform targeted support interventions to support new nurses entering the profession in crisis conditions. Public Contribution: This study involved new nurses in semi-structured interviews. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley and Sons Inc, 2023
Keywords
caring, caring science, compassion, COVID-19, emergency care, emergency department, moral stress, nurses, nursing, phenomenological hermeneutics
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-61921 (URN)10.1111/jan.15585 (DOI)000928479500001 ()36749551 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85147516068 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-02-15 Created: 2023-02-15 Last updated: 2024-04-10Bibliographically approved
Fritz, J., von Heideken Wågert, P. & Söderlund, A. (2023). CHRONIC PAIN AND SEDENTARY BEHAVIOR - WHAT TO DO?. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 30, S147-S148
Open this publication in new window or tab >>CHRONIC PAIN AND SEDENTARY BEHAVIOR - WHAT TO DO?
2023 (English)In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 30, p. S147-S148Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER, 2023
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-64542 (URN)001058769400400 ()
Available from: 2023-10-24 Created: 2023-10-24 Last updated: 2023-10-24Bibliographically approved
Lindberg, D., Elvén, M., Nilsson, K. W., von Heideken Wågert, P., Stier, J., Dahlen, M. & Kerstis, B. (2023). How Have Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior, Changed during the COVID-19 Pandemic? A Swedish Repeated Cross-Sectional Design Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 20(4), 3642-3642
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How Have Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior, Changed during the COVID-19 Pandemic? A Swedish Repeated Cross-Sectional Design Study
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2023 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 3642-3642Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB) affect people’s physical and mental health. The aim was to examine changes in PA and SB in a Swedish population: at three time points: 2019, 2020, and 2022, i.e., before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Pre-pandemic PA and SB, i.e., 2019, were assessed retrospectively in 2020. Associations between PA and SB with sex, age, occupation, COVID-19 history, weight change, health, and life satisfaction were also examined. The design was repeated cross-sectionally. The main findings demonstrate the PA levels decreased between 2019 and 2020, and between 2019 and 2022, but not between 2020 and 2022. The SB increase was most evident between 2019 and 2020. Between 2020 and 2022, results showed a decrease in SB, but SB did not reach pre-pandemic levels. Both sexes decreased their PA over time. Although men reported more PA sex, they did not have any association with PA changes. Two age groups, 19–29 years and 65–79 years, decreased their PA over time. Both PA and SB were associated with COVID-19, occupation, age, life satisfaction, health, and weight change. This study underlines the importance of monitoring changes in PA and SB as they have relevance for health and well-being. There is a risk that the levels of PA and SB do not return to pre-pandemic levels in the population.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-62022 (URN)10.3390/ijerph20043642 (DOI)36834336 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85148964455 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-03-05 Created: 2023-03-05 Last updated: 2023-03-08Bibliographically approved
Höglander, J., Holmström, I., Gustafsson, T., Lindberg, E., Söderholm, H. M., Hedén, L., . . . Sundler, A. J. (2023). Implementing A person-centred CommunicaTION (ACTION) educational intervention for in-home nursing assistants – a study protocol. BMC Geriatrics, 23(1), Article ID 112.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Implementing A person-centred CommunicaTION (ACTION) educational intervention for in-home nursing assistants – a study protocol
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2023 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 112Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: In this study, the focus is on how to support the competence development needed for nursing assistants in home care. Home care services for older persons can be challenging concerning the nature of the interpersonal interaction and communication needed to care for and respond to the diverse needs of older people who seek to live well in our communities. This implies a need to offer more person-centred care (PCC) to older persons. However, there is a lack of knowledge on how to develop such competence. We, therefore, developed A Person-centred CommunicaTION (ACTION) programme, which is a web-based educational intervention aimed at supporting competence development for nursing assistants. The research objective is to evaluate the ACTION programme with respect to participants’ responses to and the effect of the intervention. Methods: A multicentre case–control study with pre- and post-assessments was designed. The ACTION programme will be implemented at home care units, in two different geographic areas in Sweden. A total of 300 nursing assistants will be recruited: 150 for the intervention group and 150 for the control group. We will evaluate the impact measures and the process. Pre- and post-assessments will be performed with data collected via a) audio recordings of communication, b) a questionnaire on self-efficacy communication skills, PCC, empathy and job satisfaction, c) user data, evaluation forms, field notes and observations, and d) interviews. The data will be analysed with descriptive and analytic statistics and/or qualitative methods for meanings. Discussion: This study has the potential to contribute to the evidence supporting competence development required to offer person-centred and quality home care to older persons and to meet upcoming needs for flexible and easily accessible competence development. Trial registration: ISRCTN64890826. Registered 10 January 2022, https://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN64890826

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central Ltd, 2023
Keywords
Competence development, Education intervention, Home care, Nursing assistants, Older persons, Person-centred communication, Study protocol, aged, article, audio recording, case control study, communication skill, controlled study, education, empathy, female, human, human experiment, interview, job satisfaction, male, multicenter study, nursing assistant, qualitative analysis, questionnaire, self concept, Sweden, interpersonal communication, very elderly, Aged, 80 and over, Case-Control Studies, Communication, Home Care Services, Humans
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-62033 (URN)10.1186/s12877-023-03831-3 (DOI)000940262500001 ()36841761 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85148998872 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-03-08 Created: 2023-03-08 Last updated: 2024-07-04Bibliographically approved
Gusdal, A. K., Florin, U., Johansson-Pajala, R.-M., Eklund, C., Fritz, J. & von Heideken Wågert, P. (2023). Older Adults’ Use of a Research-Based Web Platform for Social Interaction. Healthcare, 11(3), Article ID 408.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Older Adults’ Use of a Research-Based Web Platform for Social Interaction
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2023 (English)In: Healthcare, E-ISSN 2227-9032, Vol. 11, no 3, article id 408Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Loneliness and social isolation are triggers for unfavorable changes in older adults’ health and well-being. Information and communication technology (ICT) can be used by older adults to mitigate the negative effects of loneliness and social isolation. However, ICT needs to be customized to the specific needs and conditions of older adults. The aim of this study was to explore older adults’ use of a new, co-designed and research-based web platform for social interaction from the perspectives of older adults, researchers, and social services personnel. The study is an intervention study with a multimethod approach in which 20 older adults used the web platform for social interaction “the Fik@ room” for eight weeks. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected pretest, during the test, and posttest. The Fik@ room met the expectations of those older adults who completed the study. It enabled them to expand their social network and develop new friendships, but their experiences of loneliness were not reduced. The involvement of social services personnel in recruitment and support was important in facilitating older adults’ use of the Fik@ room. Our study contributes knowledge about a new, co-designed and research-based web platform, customized specifically for older adults, which is valuable in guiding the design and delivery of future web platforms for social interaction among older adults.

Keywords
information and communication technology, loneliness, social isolation, social network, web platform
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-61708 (URN)10.3390/healthcare11030408 (DOI)000930407300001 ()2-s2.0-85147808732 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-01-31 Created: 2023-01-31 Last updated: 2023-03-15Bibliographically approved
Carnesten, H., von Heideken Wågert, P., Wiklund, L., Toivanen, S., Skoglund, K., Andreae, C. & Jaarsma, T. (2023). Struggling with frightening experiences in a transformed reality: A mixed methods study of healthcare workers’ experiences during the pandemic.. In: : . Paper presented at Nordic Conference in Nursing Research, Reykjavik, 2023.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Struggling with frightening experiences in a transformed reality: A mixed methods study of healthcare workers’ experiences during the pandemic.
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2023 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic continues to impact health care workers’ (HCWs’) mental health. Research show that psychological distress and hard challenges abide with strong commitment to contribute. Yet, in-depth understanding of HCWs’ experiences of the changed caring reality during the pandemic is missing. Mixed methods research (MMR) accommodates several features apart from employing either quantitative or qualitative methods. This presentation focuses on examples from the 13-step mixed method by Leech and Onwuegbuzie.

Methods: 97 HCWs in one hard-hit region in Sweden answered a web-based questionnaire measuring symptoms of stress (using DSM-5 criteria for post-traumatic stress syndrome, PTSD) in relation to perceived sense of coherence (SOC-scale) and self-compassion (SCS) as well as HCWs’ experiences. First, qualitative data (experiences of the pandemic) was analyzed by qualitative content analysis, then quantitative data (associations between PTSD and SOC/SCS) were analyzed with linear regression adjusted for covariates. Thirdly, a synthesis, the meta-inference of qualitative and quantitative data, explained a new comprehensive understanding. 

Results: By analyzing the categories and subcategories from the qualitative analysis in relation to symtoms of stress and SOC/SCS, a synthesis emerged. This was undertaken by merging and comparing the findings and discussing the new comprehensive understanding. Finally, to fully outline the mixed methods approach, qualitative and quantitative data were synthesized into a new comprehensive whole, a meta inference. 

Conclusion: This study moves away from dichotomic traditions between qualitative or quantitative approaches. By broadening the methodological departure this study may provide a new comprehensive understanding and contribute to enhance quality in MMR. 

Keywords
Stress, vårdande, sjuksköterskor, COVID-19, akutsjukvård, lidande, trauma
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Care Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-65059 (URN)
Conference
Nordic Conference in Nursing Research, Reykjavik, 2023
Projects
nurses’ lived experiences focusing on the meaning of stress and caring in hospital emergency settings during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Available from: 2023-12-20 Created: 2023-12-20 Last updated: 2023-12-21Bibliographically approved
Johansson-Pajala, R.-M., Alam, M., Gusdal, A. K., von Heideken Wågert, P., Lövenmark [Åberg] [Engström], A., Boström, A.-M. & Hammar, L. M. (2022). Anxiety and loneliness among older people living in residential care facilities or receiving home care services in Sweden during the COVID-19 pandemic: a national cross-sectional study. BMC Geriatrics, 22(1), Article ID 927.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anxiety and loneliness among older people living in residential care facilities or receiving home care services in Sweden during the COVID-19 pandemic: a national cross-sectional study
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2022 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 927Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Older people were subjected to significant restrictions on physical contacts with others during the COVID-19 pandemic. Social distancing impacts older people’s experiences of anxiety and loneliness. Despite a large body of research on the pandemic, there is little research on its effects on older people in residential care facilities (RCF) and in home care services (HCS), who are the frailest of the older population. We aimed to investigate the effect of the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in March-May 2020 on experiences of anxiety and loneliness among older people living in RCF or receiving HCS and the impact of the progression of the pandemic on these experiences.

Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional design using data from the national user satisfaction survey (March − May 2020) by the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare. Survey responses were retrieved from 27,872 older people in RCF (mean age 87 years) and 82,834 older people receiving HCS (mean age 84 years). Proportional-odds (cumulative logit) model was used to estimate the degree of association between dependent and independent variables.

Results: Loneliness and anxiety were more prevalent among the older persons living in RCF (loneliness: 69%, anxiety: 63%) than those receiving HCS (53% and 47%, respectively). Proportional odds models revealed that among the RCF and HCS respondents, the cumulative odds ratio of experiencing higher degree of anxiety increased by 1.06% and 1.04%, respectively, and loneliness by 1.13% and 1.16%, respectively, for 1% increase in the COVID-19 infection rate. Poor self-rated health was the most influential factor for anxiety in both RCF and HCS. Living alone (with HCS) was the most influential factor affecting loneliness. Experiences of disrespect from staff were more strongly associated with anxiety and loneliness in RCF than in HCS.

Conclusion: Older people in RCF or receiving HCS experienced increasing levels of anxiety and loneliness as the first wave of the pandemic progressed. Older people’ mental and social wellbeing should be recognized to a greater extent, such as by providing opportunities for social activities. Better preparedness for future similar events is needed, where restrictions on social interaction are balanced against the public health directives.

Keywords
Aged, Community health services, COVID-19, Emotions, Residential facilities, Social isolation
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-61101 (URN)10.1186/s12877-022-03544-z (DOI)000914898600001 ()36456904 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85143163763 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Mälardalen University
Available from: 2022-12-02 Created: 2022-12-02 Last updated: 2024-07-04Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6292-7010

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