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Guest, D. E. & Isaksson, K. (2019). Temporary employment contracts and employee well-being during and after the financial crisis: Introduction to the special issue. Economic and Industrial Democracy, 40(2), 165-172
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Temporary employment contracts and employee well-being during and after the financial crisis: Introduction to the special issue
2019 (English)In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 165-172Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Temporary employment has become a feature of the contemporary labour market, although its extent varies considerably across European countries. It is widely assumed that the experience of temporary work is likely to lower worker well-being. However, a major European study in 2005 found that temporary workers reported higher well-being than permanent workers. Since then, the financial crisis of 2008 and the resulting shedding of labour seems likely to have had a damaging effect on the well-being of temporary workers. The introductory article outlines these issues and introduces the subsequent articles in this special issue which explore the well-being and employment security of temporary workers in the aftermath of the financial crisis. In drawing them together, it is noted that temporary workers appear to have fared no worse than permanent workers. Indeed, job insecurity seems to have spread to permanent workers, particularly in the Mediterranean countries, creating a renewed emphasis on the role of employability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE Publications Ltd, 2019
Keywords
Employability, financial crisis, job insecurity, temporary employment, well-being
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-43886 (URN)10.1177/0143831X18804706 (DOI)000468942000001 ()2-s2.0-85058964294 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-06-11 Created: 2019-06-11 Last updated: 2019-06-12Bibliographically approved
Tafvelin, S., Isaksson, K. & Westerberg, K. (2018). The First Year of Service: A Longitudinal Study of Organisational Antecedents of Transformational Leadership in the Social Service Organisations. British Journal of Social Work, 48(2), 430-448
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The First Year of Service: A Longitudinal Study of Organisational Antecedents of Transformational Leadership in the Social Service Organisations
2018 (English)In: British Journal of Social Work, ISSN 0045-3102, E-ISSN 1468-263X, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 430-448Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this longitudinal interview study, we have strived to advance the understanding of how organisational factors may hinder the emergence of transformational leadership among first line managers in social service organisations. By interviewing managers in a Swedish social service organisation during their first year of leadership, we first identified leadership ideals and then asked them to identify factors that hinder the performance of this leadership. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the data and the results revealed that the managers strived for a transformational leadership, but several factors in the organisation made it difficult to lead in the way they intended. Hindering factors were identified both at the organisational level, such as 'top-down management', 'financial strain' and 'continuous change', and in the managers' own working environment in terms of no support', 'high work-load', 'limited influence', 'administrative tasks' and 'distance to employees'. This study contributes to our understanding of organisational antecedents of transformational leadership as well as the premises of transformational leadership in social service organisations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OXFORD UNIV PRESS, 2018
Keywords
Transformational leadership, organisational antecedents, social service organisations, qualitative study, content analysis
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-38986 (URN)10.1093/bjsw/bcx038 (DOI)000428440800010 ()2-s2.0-85044638546 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-04-12 Created: 2018-04-12 Last updated: 2018-05-31Bibliographically approved
Welander, J., Astvik, W. & Isaksson, K. (2017). Corrosion of trust: Violation of psychological contracts as a reason for turnover amongst social workers. Nordic Social Work Research, 7(1), 67-79, Article ID ISSN: 2156-857X.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Corrosion of trust: Violation of psychological contracts as a reason for turnover amongst social workers
2017 (English)In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 67-79, article id ISSN: 2156-857XArticle in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Staff shortage in the social sector is a serious problem in several countriesand the high turnover rate of professional social workers presents a majorchallenge to the professional field. Social workers distinguish themselves asa particularly exposed occupational group, reporting higher workloads andmore difficult demands in comparison with other human service workers.Inspired by psychological contract theory, the objective of this study wasto describe social workers’ turnover processes that lead to a decision to quitafter a perceived violation of a psychological contract. Thirty-one interviewswere conducted with former statutory social workers who had voluntarilyresigned from their jobs during the preceding year. The analysis identifiedfour themes in the turnover processes stemming from perceptions oforganisational failure to fulfil promises concerning the provision of: (1) abalance between demands and resources at work, (2) a balance betweenefforts and rewards, (3) organisational professional ethics, and (4) responsiblehuman resource practices. The results highlight how organisational responsesto work-related dissatisfactions by social workers seem to enhance theirconviction of psychological contract breaches and perceptions of contractviolations, resulting in turnover. An important conclusion is that public sectoremployers need to reconsider their personnel strategies and practices inorder to start rebuilding trust and creating a more positive work climate.

Keywords
Social workers; turnover; psychological contract violation; work conditions
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Working Life Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-35279 (URN)10.1080/2156857X.2016.1203814 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-05-03 Created: 2017-05-03 Last updated: 2017-05-08Bibliographically approved
Welander, J., Astvik, W. & Isaksson, K. (2017). Exit, silence and loyalty among social workers and managers in the Swedish social services. , 7(1), Article ID ISSN: 2156-857X.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exit, silence and loyalty among social workers and managers in the Swedish social services
2017 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Staff shortage in the social sector is a serious problem in several countriesand the high turnover rate of professional social workers presents a majorchallenge to the professional field. Social workers distinguish themselves asa particularly exposed occupational group, reporting higher workloads andmore difficult demands in comparison with other human service workers.Inspired by psychological contract theory, the objective of this study wasto describe social workers’ turnover processes that lead to a decision to quitafter a perceived violation of a psychological contract. Thirty-one interviewswere conducted with former statutory social workers who had voluntarilyresigned from their jobs during the preceding year. The analysis identifiedfour themes in the turnover processes stemming from perceptions oforganisational failure to fulfil promises concerning the provision of: (1) abalance between demands and resources at work, (2) a balance betweenefforts and rewards, (3) organisational professional ethics, and (4) responsiblehuman resource practices. The results highlight how organisational responsesto work-related dissatisfactions by social workers seem to enhance theirconviction of psychological contract breaches and perceptions of contractviolations, resulting in turnover. An important conclusion is that public sectoremployers need to reconsider their personnel strategies and practices inorder to start rebuilding trust and creating a more positive work climate.

Keywords
Social workers; turnover; psychological contract violation; work conditions
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Working Life Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-35283 (URN)
Available from: 2017-05-03 Created: 2017-05-03 Last updated: 2017-05-17Bibliographically approved
Welander, J., Wallin, J. & Isaksson, K. (2017). Job Resources to Promote Feelings of Pride in the Organization: The Role of Social Identification. Scandinavian Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology (1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Job Resources to Promote Feelings of Pride in the Organization: The Role of Social Identification
2017 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, ISSN 2002-2867, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Employees are assumed to obtain job resources from and identify with the organization they work for. Previously, the concepts of job resources and social identification have mostly been studied holistically, that is, on one general organizational level. This study contributes to the understanding of how job resources, operationalized at two different levels in two organizations, influence the amount of group-based pride that employees feel for their workgroups and for their organizations. Social identification is purported to intervene in this relationship on respective level, and its inclusion is expected to contribute to different kinds of pride. Regression analyses of questionnaire data gathered from 436 employees in two middle-sized municipalities in Sweden revealed that: (1) a workgroup’s resources and identification explained additional variance in workgroup pride beyond the effects of resources and identification at the organizational level, (2) leader and organizational resources and identification explained additional variance in organizational pride beyond that of workgroup resources and identification, and (3) social identification in both these areas partially mediated these relationships. Theoretical contributions include the addition of emotional outcomes of job resources and that these effects are foci-specific. This emphasizes the need to distinguish between workgroup and organizational levels regarding both independent and dependent variables. The clarification of the multiple identifications and group-based pride dynamics that exist has practical implications for Human Resource (HR) managers.

Keywords
job resources, social identification, dual identification, group-based emotions, pride
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Working Life Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-35281 (URN)10.16993/sjwop.23 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-05-03 Created: 2017-05-03 Last updated: 2018-12-17Bibliographically approved
Nielsen, K., Nielsen, M. B., Ogbonnaya, C., Kansala, M., Saari, E. & Isaksson, K. (2017). Workplace resources to improve both employee well-being and performance: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Work & Stress, 31(2), 101-120
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Workplace resources to improve both employee well-being and performance: A systematic review and meta-analysis
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Work & Stress, ISSN 0267-8373, E-ISSN 1464-5335, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 101-120Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Organisations are becoming increasingly aware of the importance of employees in gaining and maintaining competitive advantage. The happy worker-productive worker thesis suggests that workers who experience high levels of well-being also perform well and vice versa; however, organisations need to know how to ensure such happy and productive workers. The present review and meta-analysis identifies workplace resources at the individual, the group, the leader, and the organisational levels that are related to both employee well-being and organisational performance. We examine which types of resources are most important in predicting both employee well-being and performance. We identified 84 quantitative studies published in print and online from 2003 to November 2015. Resources at either of the four levels were related to both employee well-being and performance. We found no significant differences in employee well-being and organisational performance between the four levels of workplace resources, suggesting that interventions may focus on any of these levels. Cross-sectional studies showed stronger relationships with well-being and performance than longitudinal studies. Studies using objective performance ratings provided weaker relationships between resources and performance than self-rated and leader/third-party-rated studies.

National Category
Work Sciences Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-35359 (URN)10.1080/02678373.2017.1304463 (DOI)000400243400001 ()2-s2.0-85016084534 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-05-22 Created: 2017-05-22 Last updated: 2018-01-29Bibliographically approved
Loeb, C., Stempel, C. & Isaksson, K. (2016). Social and emotional self-efficacy at work. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 57(2), 152-161
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social and emotional self-efficacy at work
2016 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 152-161Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research has shown that self-efficacy is often one of the most important personal resources in the work context. However, because this research has focused on cognitive and task-oriented self-efficacy, little is known about social and emotional dimensions of self-efficacy at work. The main aim of the present study was to investigate social and emotional self-efficacy dimensions at work and to compare them to a cognitive and task-oriented dimension. Scales to measure social and emotional self-efficacy at work were developed and validated and found to be well differentiated from the cognitive task-oriented occupational self-efficacy scale. Confirmatory factor analyses of data from 226 Swedish and 591 German employees resulted in four separate but correlated self-efficacy dimensions: (1) occupational; (2) social; (3) self-oriented emotional; and (4) other-oriented emotional. Social self-efficacy explained additional variance in team climate and emotional self-efficacy in emotional irritation and emotional exhaustion, over and above effects of occupational self-efficacy. Men reported higher occupational self-efficacy, whereas social and emotional self-efficacy revealed no clear gender differences. The scales have strong psychometric properties in both Swedish and German language versions. The positive association between social self-efficacy and team climate, and the negative relationships between self-oriented emotional self-efficacy and emotional irritation and emotional exhaustion may provide promising tools for practical applications in work settings such as team-building, staff development, recruitment or other training programs aiming for work place health promotion. The next step will be to study how social and emotional self-efficacy relate to leadership, well-being and health over time.

Keywords
Emotional self-efficacy, Occupational self-efficacy, Organizational psychology, Social self-efficacy
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-31305 (URN)10.1111/sjop.12274 (DOI)000372356600008 ()26882457 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84975778676 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-03-17 Created: 2016-03-17 Last updated: 2019-01-28Bibliographically approved
Rigotti, T., Mohr, G. & Isaksson, K. (2015). Job insecurity among temporary workers: Looking through the gender lens. Economic and Industrial Democracy, 36(3), 523-547
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Job insecurity among temporary workers: Looking through the gender lens
2015 (English)In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 523-547Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Based on the gender model and the life context model, the financial and domestic responsibilities and expectations associated with getting a new assignment are tested as potential gender specific moderators of the link between job insecurity and commitment, performance, and depressive moods. In a cross-sectional international questionnaire study of 1981 temporary workers’ three-way interactions between job insecurity, gender, and the moderators were tested. Expectations play a moderating role for women only, intensifying the negative relationship between job insecurity and commitment. Financial responsibility strengthened the negative relationship of job insecurity with commitment, as well as its positive relationship with depressive moods for women and men alike. Domestic responsibility plays a moderating role in the link between job insecurity and depressive moods and performance for women, aggravating depressive moods and reducing performance. For men, domestic responsibility had a buffering effect on the relationship between job insecurity and commitment.

Keywords
Commitment; gender; job insecurity; temporary work; well-being
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Working Life Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-23759 (URN)10.1177/0143831X13516026 (DOI)000358733200008 ()2-s2.0-84938300178 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Psycones
Available from: 2013-12-19 Created: 2013-12-19 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Isaksson, K., Johansson, G. & Palm, S. (2014). Bridge employment, a Swedish perspective. In: Alcover, C-M., Topa, G., Parry, E., Fraccaroli, f. & Depolo, F. (Ed.), Bridge Employment, A research handbook: (pp. 51-69). Lancaster University, UK: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bridge employment, a Swedish perspective
2014 (English)In: Bridge Employment, A research handbook / [ed] Alcover, C-M., Topa, G., Parry, E., Fraccaroli, f. & Depolo, F., Lancaster University, UK: Routledge, 2014, p. 51-69Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lancaster University, UK: Routledge, 2014
Keywords
age and employment, retirees-employment
National Category
Social Sciences Psychology
Research subject
Working Life Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-26935 (URN)2-s2.0-84954588645 (Scopus ID)978-0-415-82909-0 (ISBN)978-0-203-38310-0 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-12-18 Created: 2014-12-18 Last updated: 2018-01-03Bibliographically approved
Isaksson, K., Hansen, E. & Loeb, C. (2013). Health promoting leadership, concepts models and behavior. In: : . Paper presented at European Congress of Psychology, Stockholm 2013.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health promoting leadership, concepts models and behavior
2013 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Working Life Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-23771 (URN)
Conference
European Congress of Psychology, Stockholm 2013
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2013-12-19 Created: 2013-12-19 Last updated: 2015-11-13Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5928-7988

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