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Söderlund, A. (2019). Artificial intelligence and physiotherapy - editorial. European Journal of Physiotherapy, 21(1), 1-1
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Artificial intelligence and physiotherapy - editorial
2019 (English)In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 1-1Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2019
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-44331 (URN)10.1080/21679169.2019.1569850 (DOI)000470063000001 ()2-s2.0-85061242540 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-06-20 Created: 2019-06-20 Last updated: 2019-11-11
Eklund, C., Elfström, M. & Söderlund, A. (2019). At two step evaluation procedure of the web-application My Stress Control: feasibility and effect. In: : . Paper presented at 10th Scientific Meeting of the International Society for Research on Internet Interventions (ISRII), Auckland, New Zeeland, 13-15 February, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>At two step evaluation procedure of the web-application My Stress Control: feasibility and effect
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Context: Stress preventive interventions should support behaviour change. Web-based programs are less resource demanding than face-to-face solutions. For the purpose of supporting behaviour change in persons with work related stress, the web-based program My Stress Control (MSC) was developed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and effect of MSC.

Methods: MSC’s feasibility was tested with 14 end-users before evaluating its effect in a two-armed RCT with 95 persons. The same procedure as for the RCT was used in the feasibility study. Questionnaires were used as data collection method. The primary outcome was perceived stress.

Intervention: MSC was built on evidence regarding theoretical frame, content and informational design. MSC is tailored to each individual by Stages of Change and with a functional behaviour analysis (FBA) conducted by the users in interactive assignments, steering the user to stress-management strategies. Techniques supporting behavioural change are integrated throughout the program.

Results: The feasibility of MSC reached above the pre-set cut-off score. The results of the RCT revealed no significant differences between groups in the primary outcome, but a small effect size was shown between intervention and wait-list group. Adherence was low with 25% of the participants in the intervention group responding to post assessment. 

Conclusions: It is still uncertain if MSC is an effective method for supporting behaviour change in persons with work related stress. Further development must be conducted regarding adherence before next evaluation study. Nevertheless, the small effect size encourages further development and evaluation of MSC.

National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-46315 (URN)
Conference
10th Scientific Meeting of the International Society for Research on Internet Interventions (ISRII), Auckland, New Zeeland, 13-15 February, 2019
Funder
AFA Insurance, 130263
Available from: 2019-12-12 Created: 2019-12-12 Last updated: 2019-12-17Bibliographically approved
Fritz, J., Söderlund, A., Wallin, L., Almqvist, L. & Sandborgh, M. (2019). EXPERIENCES OF USING THE MEDICAL RESEARCH COUNCIL GUIDANCE FOR PROCESS EVALUATION. In: Advances in Health Care Sciences Conferences, Karolinska Insitutet, Stockholm, 13-14 November, 2019.: . Paper presented at Advances in Health Care Sciences Conferences, Karolinska Insitutet, Stockholm, 13-14 November, 2019..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>EXPERIENCES OF USING THE MEDICAL RESEARCH COUNCIL GUIDANCE FOR PROCESS EVALUATION
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2019 (English)In: Advances in Health Care Sciences Conferences, Karolinska Insitutet, Stockholm, 13-14 November, 2019., 2019Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-46056 (URN)
Conference
Advances in Health Care Sciences Conferences, Karolinska Insitutet, Stockholm, 13-14 November, 2019.
Available from: 2019-11-15 Created: 2019-11-15 Last updated: 2019-12-17Bibliographically approved
Arkkukangas, M., Söderlund, A., Eriksson, S. & Johansson, A.-C. (2019). Fall Preventive Exercise with or without behavior change support for community-dwelling older adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial With Short-Term Follow-up.. Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy, 42(1), 9-17
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fall Preventive Exercise with or without behavior change support for community-dwelling older adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial With Short-Term Follow-up.
2019 (English)In: Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy, ISSN 1539-8412, E-ISSN 2152-0895, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 9-17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Health Sciences
Research subject
Care Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-34994 (URN)10.1519/JPT.0000000000000129 (DOI)000457564600002 ()28244890 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85051527684 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-03-03 Created: 2017-03-03 Last updated: 2019-03-29Bibliographically approved
Dean, E., Skinner, M., Myezwa, H., Mkumbuzi, V., Mostert, K., Parra, D. C., . . . Group, G. H. (2019). Health Competency Standards in Physical Therapist Practice. Physical Therapy, 99(9), 1242-1254
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health Competency Standards in Physical Therapist Practice
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2019 (English)In: Physical Therapy, ISSN 0031-9023, E-ISSN 1538-6724, Vol. 99, no 9, p. 1242-1254Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although the physical therapist profession is the leading established, largely nonpharmacological health profession in the world and is committed to health promotion and noncommunicable disease (NCD) prevention, these have yet to be designated as core physical therapist competencies. Based on findings of 3 Physical Therapy Summits on Global Health, addressing NCDs (heart disease, cancer, hypertension, stroke, diabetes, obesity, and chronic lung disease) has been declared an urgent professional priority. The Third Summit established the status of health competencies in physical therapist practice across the 5 World Confederation for Physical Therapy (WCPT) regions with a view to establish health competency standards, this article's focus. Three general principles related to health-focused practice emerged, along with 3 recommendations for its inclusion. Participants acknowledged that specific competencies are needed to ensure that health promotion and NCD prevention are practiced consistently by physical therapists within and across WCPT regions (ie, effective counseling for smoking cessation, basic nutrition, weight control, and reduced sitting and increased activity/exercise in patients and clients, irrespective of their presenting complaints/diagnoses). Minimum accreditable health competency standards within the profession, including use of the WCPT-supported Health Improvement Card, were recommended for inclusion into practice, entry-to-practice education, and research. Such standards are highly consistent with the mission of the WCPT and the World Health Organization. The physical therapist profession needs to assume a leadership role vis-à-vis eliminating the gap between what we know unequivocally about the causes of and contributors to NCDs and the long-term benefits of effective, sustained, nonpharmacological lifestyle behavior change, which no drug nor many surgical procedures have been reported to match.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NLM (Medline), 2019
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-45258 (URN)10.1093/ptj/pzz087 (DOI)000493049100014 ()2-s2.0-85071856171 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-09-19 Created: 2019-09-19 Last updated: 2019-11-14Bibliographically approved
Söderlund, A. (2019). Health promotion for older persons by decreasing sedentary behaviour–Editorial. European Journal of Physiotherapy, 21(3)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health promotion for older persons by decreasing sedentary behaviour–Editorial
2019 (English)In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 21, no 3Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor and Francis Ltd, 2019
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-45019 (URN)10.1080/21679169.2019.1640346 (DOI)000482502500001 ()2-s2.0-85070333836 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-08-15 Created: 2019-08-15 Last updated: 2019-11-11
Fritz, J., Wallin, L., Söderlund, A., Almqvist, L. & Sandborgh, M. (2019). Implementation of a behavioral medicine approach in physiotherapy: A process evaluation of facilitation methods. Implementation Science, 14(1), Article ID 94.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Implementation of a behavioral medicine approach in physiotherapy: A process evaluation of facilitation methods
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2019 (English)In: Implementation Science, ISSN 1748-5908, E-ISSN 1748-5908, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 94Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: In a quasi-experimental study, facilitation was used to support implementation of the behavioral medicine approach in physiotherapy. The facilitation consisted of an individually tailored multifaceted intervention including outreach visits, peer coaching, educational materials, individual goal-setting, video feedback, self-monitoring in a diary, manager support, and information leaflets to patients. A behavioral medicine approach implies a focus on health related behavior change. Clinical behavioral change was initiated but not maintained among the participating physiotherapists. To explain these findings, a deeper understanding of the implementation process is necessary. The aim was therefore to explore the impact mechanisms in the implementation of a behavioral medicine approach in physiotherapy by examining dose, reach, and participant experiences. Methods: An explorative mixed-methods design was used as a part of a quasi-experimental trial. Twenty four physiotherapists working in primary health care were included in the quasi-experimental trial, and all physiotherapists in the experimental group (n = 15) were included in the current study. A facilitation intervention based mainly on social cognitive theory was tested during a 6-month period. Data were collected during and after the implementation period by self-reports of time allocation regarding participation in different implementation methods, documentation of individual goals, ranking of the most important implementation methods, and semi-structured interviews. Descriptive statistical methods and inductive content analysis were used. Results: The physiotherapists participated most frequently in the following implementation methods: outreach visits, peer coaching, educational materials, and individual goal-setting. They also considered these methods to be the most important for implementation, contributing to support for learning, practice, memory, emotions, self-management, and time management. However, time management support from the manager was lacking. Conclusions: The findings indicate that different mechanisms govern the initiation and maintenance of clinical behavior change. The impact mechanisms for initiation of clinical behavior change refers to the use of externally initiated multiple methods, such as feedback on practice, time management, and extrinsic motivation. The lack of self-regulation capability, intrinsic motivation, and continued support after the implementation intervention period were interpreted as possible mechanisms for the failure of maintaining the behavioral change over time. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central Ltd., 2019
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-46027 (URN)10.1186/s13012-019-0942-y (DOI)000494477200001 ()31684977 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85074548087 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-11-14 Created: 2019-11-14 Last updated: 2019-11-21
Kyhlbäck, M., Söderlund, A., Thierfelder, T., Frykberg, G. & Elmgren, G. (2019). Physiotherapy treatment of the diabetic shoulder: health-related quality of life and measures of shoulder function regarding patients with type 1 diabetes. Disability and Rehabilitation, 41(12), 1435-1442
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physiotherapy treatment of the diabetic shoulder: health-related quality of life and measures of shoulder function regarding patients with type 1 diabetes
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2019 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 41, no 12, p. 1435-1442Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate how health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and functional shoulder range of motion are affected among patients with diabetes with shoulder problems, treated with a specific physiotherapy programme. A further aim was to investigate how health-related quality of life, functional shoulder range of motion, pain intensity, and shoulder function correlate within the group of patients after the treatment period. Method: A pre-post treatment design was applied for a study group of ten patients with type 1 diabetes and shoulder problems. The physiotherapy treatment consisted of exercises promoting enhanced micro-circulation in the shoulder tissues, optimal shoulder co-ordination, and muscle relaxation. The Short Form-36 (SF-36), shoulder range of motion measures, the Shoulder Rating Scale - Swedish version, and pain intensity measures were used. The results regarding SF-36 were compared with the results of a control group of patients having either type 1 or type 2 diabetes and shoulder problems that did not receive any specific physiotherapy treatment. Results: As a potential result of physiotherapy training, a significant change towards higher scores was observed in the physical component summary (PCS) measure of SF-36. There was a significant improvement regarding PCS in the study group as compared with the control group. There were negative correlations between the four aspects of pain intensity and PCS and Shoulder Rating Scale - Swedish version, respectively, but a positive correlation between PCS and Shoulder Rating Scale - Swedish version. "Hand-raising" and "hand-behind-back" were significantly improved, and proved to be positively correlated with Shoulder Rating Scale - Swedish version. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that patients with type 1 diabetes and shoulder problems, treated with a specific physiotherapy programme, may improve with respect to physical aspects of health-related quality of life, and partially regain their range of motion in the shoulder joint. Based on these results, the associated treatment protocol may be recommended for physiotherapy treatment in such patients.

National Category
Physiotherapy
Research subject
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-41325 (URN)10.1080/09638288.2018.1430177 (DOI)000465205000008 ()29363341 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85040990882 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-11-13 Created: 2018-11-13 Last updated: 2019-11-11
Elvén, M., Hochwälder, J., Dean, E. & Söderlund, A. (2019). Predictors of Clinical Reasoning Using the Reasoning 4 Change Instrument With Physical Therapist Students. Physical Therapy, 99(8), 964-976
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predictors of Clinical Reasoning Using the Reasoning 4 Change Instrument With Physical Therapist Students
2019 (English)In: Physical Therapy, ISSN 0031-9023, E-ISSN 1538-6724, Vol. 99, no 8, p. 964-976Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although physical therapist students must be well prepared to integrate biopsychosocial and behavioral perspectives into their clinical reasoning, there is a lack of knowledge regarding factors that influence such competence. This study explored the associations among the independent variables-knowledge, cognition, metacognition, psychological factors, contextual factors, and curriculum orientation vis-a-vis behavioral medicine competencies-and the dependent variables-outcomes of input from client (IC), functional behavioral analysis (FBA), and strategies for behavior change (SBC) as levels in physical therapist students' clinical reasoning processes. This study used an exploratory cross-sectional design. The Reasoning 4 Change instrument was completed by 151 final-semester physical therapist students. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses for IC, FBA, and SBC were conducted. In the first step, curriculum orientation was inserted into the model; in the second step, self-rated knowledge, cognition, and metacognition; and in the third step, psychological factors. All independent variables except contextual factors explained 37% of the variance in the outcome of IC. Curriculum orientation explained 3%, cognitive and metacognitive factors an additional 22%, and attitudes another 15%. Variance in the outcomes of FBA and SBC were explained by curriculum orientation only (FBA change in R-2=0.04; SBC change in R-2=0.05). Higher scores of the dependent variables were associated with a curriculum having behavioral medicine competencies. The limitations of this study are that it was cross-sectional. Cognitive and metacognitive capabilities and skills and positive attitudes are important predictors of physical therapist students' clinical reasoning focused on behavior change at the IC level. Curricula with behavioral medicine competencies are associated with positive outcomes at all clinical reasoning levels.

National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-42932 (URN)10.1093/ptj/pzz044 (DOI)000482424200003 ()30869789 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85070756500 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-03-18 Created: 2019-03-18 Last updated: 2019-11-12Bibliographically approved
Chen, K., Andersen, T., Carroll, L., Connelly, L., Cote, P., Curatolo, M., . . . Sterling, M. (2019). Recommendations For Core Outcome Domain Set For Whiplash-Associated Disorders (CATWAD). The Clinical Journal of Pain, 35(9), 727-736
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Recommendations For Core Outcome Domain Set For Whiplash-Associated Disorders (CATWAD)
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2019 (English)In: The Clinical Journal of Pain, ISSN 0749-8047, E-ISSN 1536-5409, Vol. 35, no 9, p. 727-736Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Inconsistent reporting of outcomes in clinical trials of treatments for Whiplash-associated Disorders (WAD) hinders effective data pooling and conclusions that can be drawn about the effectiveness of tested treatments. The aim of this study was to provide recommendations for core outcome domains that should be included in clinical trials of WAD. Materials and Methods: A 3-step process was used: (1) A list of potential core outcome domains were identified from the published literature. (2) Researchers, health care providers, patients, and insurance personnel participated and rated the importance of each domain via a 3-round Delphi survey. A priori criteria for consensus were established. (3) Experts comprising researchers, health care providers, and a consumer representative participated in a multidisciplinary consensus meeting that made final decisions on the recommended core outcome domains. Results: The literature search identified 63 potential core domains. A total of 223 participants were invited to partake in the Delphi surveys, with 41.7% completing round 1, 45.3% round 2, and 51.4% round 3. Eleven core domains met the criteria for inclusion across the entire sample. After the expert consensus meeting, 6 core domains were recommended: Physical Functioning, Perceived Recovery, Work and Social Functioning, Psychological Functioning, Quality of Life, and Pain. Discussion: A 3-step process was used to recommend core outcome domains for clinical trials in WAD. Six core domains were recommended: Physical Functioning, Perceived Recovery, Work and Social Functioning, Psychological Functioning, Quality of Life, and Pain. The next step is to determine the outcome measurement instruments for each of these domains.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS, 2019
Keywords
whiplash, outcome, domains, neck, pain
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-46336 (URN)10.1097/AJP.0000000000000735 (DOI)000482066400001 ()31188173 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85067368267 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-12-13 Created: 2019-12-13 Last updated: 2020-02-20Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4537-030X

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