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Redmalm, D. (2019). A bifocal perspective on the riding school: On Lévinas and equine faces. In: Jonna Bornemark, Petra Andersson, Ulla Ekström von Essen (Ed.), Equine Cultures in Transition: Ethical Questions (pp. 193-206). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A bifocal perspective on the riding school: On Lévinas and equine faces
2019 (English)In: Equine Cultures in Transition: Ethical Questions / [ed] Jonna Bornemark, Petra Andersson, Ulla Ekström von Essen, London: Routledge , 2019, p. 193-206Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Redmalm’s chapter, “A Bifocal Perspective on the Riding School: On Lévinas and Equine Faces” draws on Emmanuel Lévinas’ ethics to study the ambiguous relationship between horses and leisure riders in riding schools. For Lévinas, ethics begins in the face-to-face relationship. Being bifocal, horses do not “face” humans in an anthropomorphic sense; however, deeply meaningful relationships emerge from the embodied horse-human reciprocity. The encounters at the riding school opens up the possibility of recognizing a Lévinasian “face” in horses in a wide sense of the term, but the prevalent instrumental approach towards horses as learning tools obscures horses’ status as possible ethical others. The riding school thus creates a bifocal view of horses as both partners in embodied emphatic entanglement, and instruments that riders must learn to handle and control. The riding school as such works as an environment where these two opposing versions of the horse are accommodated so that the potential tension between the two perspectives is alleviated. Nevertheless, it is possible to imagine alternative human-horse relationships by focusing on the situations at riding schools where equine faces are allowed to emerge.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2019
Series
Routledge Advances in Sociology ; 256
Keywords
Animal studies, ethics, Donna Haraway, horses, human-animal studies, Emmanuel Lévinas, posthuman ethics, posthumanism, riding schools
National Category
Sociology Social Anthropology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-45379 (URN)9781138549593 (ISBN)
Projects
Intimitetens sociala former
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2014-1465
Available from: 2019-10-04 Created: 2019-10-04 Last updated: 2019-10-11Bibliographically approved
Redmalm, D. (2019). Gränsdjur: Om konsten att balansera på gränsen mellan natur och kultur med människor, hundar, hästar och andra djur. In: : . Paper presented at Korpo filosofidagar 2019 - En gemensam värld: Djur och kultur, 20 juli.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gränsdjur: Om konsten att balansera på gränsen mellan natur och kultur med människor, hundar, hästar och andra djur
2019 (Swedish)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Introduktionstext till Korpo filosofidagar 2019, tema "En gemensam värld: Djur och kultur" 

Människan och djur är en tematik som genomsyrar filosofin, där idéer om det mänskliga ofta uttrycks i kontrast till natur eller djur. Under Korpo filosofidagar undersöks människans relationer till djur som en öppen fråga: vilka olika innebörder kan djur få i våra liv? Djur finns på olika platser: i våra hem, på laboratorier, i lantbruket, i naturen och på djurparker. Vilka samhälleliga, etiska, politiska och filosofiska frågeställningar väcks i dessa sammanhang?

Samtida diskussioner om djuren i kulturen sitter ofta fast i bilder av djur som tidlösa naturvarelser medan människan ses som dynamisk, kulturell och föränderlig. Denna bild har i allt högre grad ifrågasatts i diskussioner om ”det antropocena” och ”det posthumana”, som strävar att ifrågasätta vanemässiga tankesätt och uppdelningar mellan ”djur och människa”, och granskar hur människor och djur skapar praktiker och gemenskaper tillsammans. Under Korpo filosofidagar diskuterade vi denna tematik ur olika synvinklar, med en strävan till att få en klarare bild av djuren i kulturen.

Keywords
relationen mellan människa och djur, human-animal studies, Giorgio Agamben, hästar, hundar
National Category
Sociology Philosophy Social Anthropology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-45958 (URN)
Conference
Korpo filosofidagar 2019 - En gemensam värld: Djur och kultur, 20 juli
Projects
Intimitetens sociala former
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2014-1465
Note

Inbjuden talare

Available from: 2019-11-12 Created: 2019-11-12 Last updated: 2019-12-17Bibliographically approved
Redmalm, D. (2019). Liminanimals: Celebrity Chihuahuas, Presidential Pets and Riding School Horses. In: : . Paper presented at Interspecies Relationality – European Summer School at Kassel University July 28–August 4, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Liminanimals: Celebrity Chihuahuas, Presidential Pets and Riding School Horses
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

n this lecture sociologist David Redmalm will talk about companion animals and their liminal status in human society. He will show how thinking with companion animals can challenge ingrained stereotypical ideas about the distinction between nature and culture, and how this distinction shapes interspecies relationality. To show how "liminanimals" can enable a more nuanced understanding of what we think of as nature and culture, David Redmalm will draw on a number of examples from his own research: Chihuahuas and their symbolic and material role in Western society, the media narrative of Obama family’s dog Bo Obama, and the disciplining of human and equine bodies in riding schools.

Keywords
Giorgio Agamben, horses, human-animal studies, riding schools, Mary Douglas, dogs, Karl Marx, Charlotte Perkins Gilman
National Category
Sociology Philosophy Social Anthropology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-45959 (URN)
Conference
Interspecies Relationality – European Summer School at Kassel University July 28–August 4, 2019
Projects
Intimitetens sociala former
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2014-1465
Note

Invited speaker, keynote

Available from: 2019-11-12 Created: 2019-11-12 Last updated: 2019-12-17Bibliographically approved
Redmalm, D. (2019). Liminanimals: Chihuahuas, Bo the dog and the Scaly Ant-Eater. In: : . Paper presented at Konstfack Research Week, January 28–February 1, 2019. Stockholm
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Liminanimals: Chihuahuas, Bo the dog and the Scaly Ant-Eater
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In this lecture sociologist David Redmalm will talk about pets and their liminal status in human society. He will show how thinking with pets can challenge ingrained stereotypical ideas about the distinction between nature and culture, and how this distinction shapes human and nonhuman lives. To show how pets can enable a more nuanced understanding of what we think of as nature and culture, David Redmalm will draw on a number of examples from his own research: Chihuahuas and their symbolic and material role in Western society, the media narrative of Obama family’s dog Bo Obama, pet cultural expressions of grief for lost pets, and the curious habits of the scaly anteater.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: , 2019
Keywords
Animal studies, Chihuahuas, Mary Douglas, Donna Haraway, Human-Animal Studies, liminality, Bjarne Melgaard, Barack Obama
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-45393 (URN)
Conference
Konstfack Research Week, January 28–February 1, 2019
Projects
Intimitetens sociala former
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2014-1465
Available from: 2019-10-04 Created: 2019-10-04 Last updated: 2019-10-11Bibliographically approved
Redmalm, D. (2019). To make pets live, and to let them die: The biopolitics of pet keeping (1ed.). In: Tora Holmberg, Annika Jonsson, Fredrik Palm (Ed.), Death Matters: Cultural Sociology of Mortal Life (pp. 241-263). London: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>To make pets live, and to let them die: The biopolitics of pet keeping
2019 (English)In: Death Matters: Cultural Sociology of Mortal Life / [ed] Tora Holmberg, Annika Jonsson, Fredrik Palm, London: Palgrave Macmillan , 2019, 1, p. 241-263Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Pets are often considered to be friends or part of the nuclear family, and many pets are grieved when they die. But pets are also routinely bred in abundance, bought, sold, and euthanized when they are unwanted. The aim of this chapter is to suggest a way of understanding pet keeping in the light of pets’ paradoxical status between “grievable” and “killable.” It argues that the ambiguous conceptualization of the pet as an irreplaceable individual and as a consumable resource corresponds to a biopolitical rationale for breeding, buying, selling and killing pets. The chapter suggests that pet keeping can be regarded as a demarcated zone where biopolitical norms surrounding life and death can be played with, managed and reproduced.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019 Edition: 1
Keywords
Giorgio Agamben, animal studies, bereavement, biopolitics, biopower, Judith Butler, cats, companion animals, consumption, disciplinary power, dogs, Michel Foucault, grief, human-animal studies, pets, posthumanism, subject position, subjectification, subjectivity
National Category
Sociology Philosophy Social Anthropology
Research subject
Sociology; Philosophy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-45406 (URN)978-3-030-11484-8 (ISBN)978-3-030-11485-5 (ISBN)
Projects
Intimitetens sociala former
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-1465
Available from: 2019-10-04 Created: 2019-10-04 Last updated: 2019-10-11Bibliographically approved
Schuurman, N. & Redmalm, D. (2019). Transgressing boundaries of grievability: Ambiguous emotions at pet cemeteries. Emotion, Space and Society, 31, 32-40
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transgressing boundaries of grievability: Ambiguous emotions at pet cemeteries
2019 (English)In: Emotion, Space and Society, ISSN 1755-4586, E-ISSN 1878-0040, Vol. 31, p. 32-40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2019
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-45415 (URN)10.1016/j.emospa.2019.03.006 (DOI)000469383500005 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2014-1465
Available from: 2019-10-04 Created: 2019-10-04 Last updated: 2019-10-11Bibliographically approved
Redmalm, D. & Skoglund, A. (2018). Bringing one’s self to work and back again: The role of surprises in alternative entrepreneurship. In: European Group of Organization Studies: . Paper presented at EGOS: Surprise in and around Organizations: Journeys to the Unexpected, July 5–7, 2018 Tallinn, Estonia.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bringing one’s self to work and back again: The role of surprises in alternative entrepreneurship
2018 (English)In: European Group of Organization Studies, 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

With the increasing realization that boundaries are constructed in relation to certain “differences” that make up an organizational “inside” in relation to its “outside”, organizational scholars have intensified their studies of how identities are hosted and managed within organizations. Less known, however, is the wish of organizations to disrupt and destabilize their members’ subjectification to the organization by inviting them to with personally challenging experiences and curated surprises. To explore this type of intentional disruptions, we study a technology company that engages in a number of social issues only loosely connected to their main product, a digital presentation tool. We especially focus on one intervention: a yearly project in which the company’s employees renovate buildings in a community where most are Roma with low socio-economic status. 

Keywords
Alternative Entrepreneurship, employee, organization, subjectivity, surprises
National Category
Economics and Business Sociology
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in industrial engineering and management; Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-45410 (URN)
Conference
EGOS: Surprise in and around Organizations: Journeys to the Unexpected, July 5–7, 2018 Tallinn, Estonia
Funder
Ragnar Söderbergs stiftelse, E19/14
Available from: 2019-10-04 Created: 2019-10-04 Last updated: 2019-11-19
Redmalm, D. & Holmberg, T. (2018). Stable Genius?: The making of “good riders” and “good horses” at the riding school. In: : . Paper presented at SANT/FAS 2018 Conference: Vulnerabilities, April 19–21, 2018, Uppsala, Sweden. Uppsala
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stable Genius?: The making of “good riders” and “good horses” at the riding school
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

How do riders valuate human and equine psyches and bodies?  The paper builds on a study in which riding groups are followed before, during and after riding lessons. The analysis shows that early career riders view horses partly as passive tools and partly as threatening adversaries. After a while, riding school pupils come to see horses’ vulnerable position—more experienced riders explain that they try to understand the horses’ perspective of the riding school, which includes long days, difficult pupils and sometimes violent treatment. While riders increasingly come to think of horses as persons, they begin thinking of themselves as human animals—as corporeal rather than cerebral beings. The riding school is thus a place where humans are becoming horse, and the horses emerge as human-like creatures. But while most riders contrast the liberating environment of the riding school to the alienating conditions of the work-week, some also recognize that the riding school requires that the horses are alienated from their own equine selves. Ultimately, “good horses” are the ones seen as willing to accept these conditions. “Good riders” learn to benefit from those same conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: , 2018
Keywords
Animal studies, centaurs, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, horses, human-animal studies, Karl Marx, riding schools
National Category
Social Anthropology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-45408 (URN)
Conference
SANT/FAS 2018 Conference: Vulnerabilities, April 19–21, 2018, Uppsala, Sweden
Projects
Intimitetens sociala former
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2014-1465
Available from: 2019-10-04 Created: 2019-10-04 Last updated: 2019-11-19
Redmalm, D. & Skoglund, A. (2018). Taking one’s self to work and back again: Alternative Entrepreneurship and Social interventions. In: : . Paper presented at Sociologidagarna, the Swedish Sociological Association Conference, March 7–9, 2018, Lund, Sweden. Lund
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Taking one’s self to work and back again: Alternative Entrepreneurship and Social interventions
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Scholars have increasingly paid interest to the way companies build a brand and an office culture by encouraging employees to talk about and cultivate their creative interests and personal values within the frames of their occupation. By bringing one’s self to work the employee contributes to a creative work environment that attracts potential candidates, and that benefits economic gain. This paper focuses on how the IT-company Prezi, founded in Hungary in 2009, creates outlets for the personal dimensions that employees bring to work. Prezi attracts employees sharing liberal and cosmopolitan views who contribute to building a brand and an office culture outside-in, in sharp contrast with the surrounding society characterized by a wave of right-wing populism and nationalist sentiments in Hungary. As a consequence, employees talk of their workplace as a protected “bubble.”

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: , 2018
Keywords
Giorgio Agamben, Alternative Entrepreneurship, Michel Foucault, identity, information and communication technology, organizational culture, Roma, Subjectivity
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Sociology; Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-45411 (URN)
Conference
Sociologidagarna, the Swedish Sociological Association Conference, March 7–9, 2018, Lund, Sweden
Projects
Videography of "Alternative Entrepreneurship"
Funder
Ragnar Söderbergs stiftelse, E 14/19
Available from: 2019-10-04 Created: 2019-10-04 Last updated: 2019-11-19
Redmalm, D. (2018). The horse, in his present condition of slavery: Alienation and Self-Realization in the Riding School. In: : . Paper presented at Un(Common) Worlds: Human-Animal Studies Conference, August 7–9, 2018. Turku
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The horse, in his present condition of slavery: Alienation and Self-Realization in the Riding School
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

What do riding school pupils talk about? Like most of us, they complain about their jobs. This Swedish riding school ethnography shows how pupils turn the riding school into a sphere of intimacy separated from everyday life. The riding lessons can serve as a break from a stressful job, a demanding family situation, or a personal crisis. And although teachers continuously judge the pupils’ performance, riders say that they gladly subject themselves to critique. Everything is focused on reaching the few, fleeting and euphoric moments when riders feel that they are one with the horse. Because of these moments, some even talk about riding as a path to self-realization.

 

The discussion of the ethnographic material is guided by the comparison between the situation of women and horses Charlotte Perkins Gilman makes in her classic Women and Economics from 1898: horses and women are in the same “condition of slavery” as they are economically dependent on men. Transposed to the present empirical setting—my informants are either woman or horse—the analogy sheds light on the inequality between humans and horses. The riding school can help humans transcend the capitalist condition of “slavery” for a moment, but many informants realize that to do so, they contribute to subjugating the horses to the elaborate disciplinary and administrative apparatus. The paper thus argues that the riding school can only provide riders with a sort of melancholic escapism that can never fundamentally challenge the present condition of slavery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Turku: , 2018
Keywords
Animal studies, centaurs, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Horses, human-animal studies, Karl Marx, riding schools
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-45404 (URN)
Conference
Un(Common) Worlds: Human-Animal Studies Conference, August 7–9, 2018
Projects
Intimitetens sociala former
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2014-1465
Available from: 2019-10-04 Created: 2019-10-04 Last updated: 2019-11-19
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9902-1191

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