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Asztalos Morell, IldikóORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3442-187X
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Publications (10 of 35) Show all publications
Darvishpour, M., Asztalos Morell, I., Månsson, N., Mahmoodian, M. & Hoppe, M. (2019). Ensamkommande ungdomars röster om mottagande, inkludering och jämställdhetsutveckling. In: Mehrdad Darvishpour; Niclas Månsson (Ed.), Ensamkommandes upplevelser & professionellas erfarenheter: . Liber
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ensamkommande ungdomars röster om mottagande, inkludering och jämställdhetsutveckling
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2019 (Swedish)In: Ensamkommandes upplevelser & professionellas erfarenheter / [ed] Mehrdad Darvishpour; Niclas Månsson, Liber, 2019Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Liber, 2019
National Category
Social Sciences Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Social Work; Industrial Economics and Organisations
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-42613 (URN)978-91-47-12926-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-02-08 Created: 2019-02-08 Last updated: 2019-10-01Bibliographically approved
Darvishpour, M., Månsson, N., Asztalos Morell, I. & Hoppe, M. (2019). Samverkan och utmaningar – mottagande av ensamkommande ungdomar. In: Mehrad Darvishpour; Niclas Månsson (Ed.), Ensamkommandes upplevelser & professionellas erfarenheter: . Liber
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Samverkan och utmaningar – mottagande av ensamkommande ungdomar
2019 (Swedish)In: Ensamkommandes upplevelser & professionellas erfarenheter / [ed] Mehrad Darvishpour; Niclas Månsson, Liber, 2019Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Liber, 2019
National Category
Social Sciences Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Social Work; Industrial Economics and Organisations
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-42614 (URN)978-91-47-12926-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-02-08 Created: 2019-02-08 Last updated: 2019-10-01Bibliographically approved
Asztalos Morell, I. (2019). The Role of Public Private Partnership in the Governance of Racialised Poverty in a Marginalised Rural Municipality in Hungary. Sociologia Ruralis, 59(3), 494-516
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Role of Public Private Partnership in the Governance of Racialised Poverty in a Marginalised Rural Municipality in Hungary
2019 (English)In: Sociologia Ruralis, ISSN 0038-0199, E-ISSN 1467-9523, Vol. 59, no 3, p. 494-516Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article explores the local governance of poverty alleviation in a marginalised Hungarian rural community, with over 50 per cent Roma inhabitants, most of whom were either unemployed or participated in public work projects. Kisbalog is among those marginalised rural communities which are characterised by increasing social polarisation and ethnic cleavages as a result of selective outmigration and a municipal leadership which negotiates access to public work along racialised notions of deservingness. Hungary follows the EU concept of public private partnerships for local governance. This article unravels the room for manoeuvre for NGOs working for poverty alleviation in the context of the racialised narratives of a paternalistic local welfare state. Utilising Young's notions of social justice it explores the complicit nature of recognitional, associative and distributional justice in order to understand the interplay in partnerships between public and private agencies. From among three types of strategies, coercive, isolated and deliberative, the last one has the potential to bring about transformative changes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2019
National Category
Social Anthropology Public Administration Studies Work Sciences Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-45012 (URN)10.1111/soru.12256 (DOI)000478097700007 ()2-s2.0-85068323458 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-08-15 Created: 2019-08-15 Last updated: 2019-08-15Bibliographically approved
Asztalos Morell, I. (2018). Contestations of the Swedish Deportation Regime: Civil Mobilisation for and with Afghan Youth. In: Margit Feischmidt, Ludger Pries and Celine Cantat (Ed.), Refugee Protection and Civil Society in Europe: (pp. 319-351). London: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contestations of the Swedish Deportation Regime: Civil Mobilisation for and with Afghan Youth
2018 (English)In: Refugee Protection and Civil Society in Europe / [ed] Margit Feischmidt, Ludger Pries and Celine Cantat, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018, p. 319-351Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Sweden was the country within the EU that received the highest number of unaccompanied asylum-seeking children (UASC) and youth in relation to the country’s population during 2015. Out of the 162,877 asylum-seekers arrived during 2015, half were children and half of the children (35,369) arrived unaccompanied. UASC possess special rights as children during the asylum process. Whereas their asylum grounds are assessed by the Migration Agency, the minors’ everyday whereabouts are under the responsibility of municipalities. Being a minor gives access to preferential treatment and rights compared to adult asylum seekers, both in terms of access to municipal services, such as healthcare, schools, housing, social support, and in terms of considerations of asylum grounds leading to residency in Sweden.

However, from 2016, austerity measures were put in place that, combined with an intensified and long-running securitisation of migration management, had serious consequences for these children and youth. Among the most imperative developments, there has been an increased suspicion of UASC’s self-declared age in the asylum process, combined with a medicalisation of age determination. The “writing up” of minors’ age has increased, thereby commonly leading to the rejection of UASC’s asylum claims and a deportation order. Due to a long processing time at the Migration Agency and in the Swedish migration courts, many youths have also turned 18 during their wait for a final case decision.

In reponse to these developments, protests have been organised and Sweden has seen a growing civil societal engagement on behalf of and together with UASC. This chapter explores civil societal engagement, both by and on behalf of unaccompanied asylum-seeking children (UASC) of Afghan origin in Sweden. It focuses on the period starting after 2015, and proceeds through an analysis of the Facebook site: “Stoppa utvisningarna av afghanska ungdomar!” [Stop the deportation of Afghan youths!] [Stop deportations]. This site, initiated in the fall of 2016 quickly gathered 20,000 supporters, brought together youth from Afghanistan and Swedish civilians engaged in demanding better asylum procedures for asylum-seeking youth from Afghanistan. This paper will focus on the interconnections between civil society mobilisation and UASC mobilisation around the struggles concerning

1 I am thankful to Anna Lundberg, whose comments and suggestions on relevant theoretical frameworks have greatly contributed to the improvement of this text. I am also thankful to the editors of this book who have contributed with insightful comments to develop this text. Ingrid Eckerman, the initiator of the facebook site “Stoppa utvisningar!” has commented on a version of this text and contributed with valuable additional aspects, which were incorporated into this version, for which I am thankful.

1

securitisation, anti-deportation and amnesty2. It will particularly examine how mobilisation based on different types of agencies were mediated through social media.

To start with the paper sheds light on the emergence of social movements in Sweden. Secondly, it explores how the theoretical frameworks of “pragmatic voluntarism” and “subversive humanitarianism” contribute to problematise pro-refugee movements and how pro-refugee movements could be understood as struggles for reconfiguring hegemonic perceptions of refugees. Thirdly, it discusses the way how narrative analysis contributes to understand of these reconfigurative processes. Finally, following a brief reflection on the origins and activities of the site, the article explores the activities on this site as expressions of positions ranging from “pragmatic voluntarism” to “subversive humanitarianism”. It explores also the kind of alternative subjectivities they offer for UASC, and the kind of space they create between “exclusion” and “inclusion”. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018
Keywords
migration, asylum, civil society, facebook, unaccompanied asylum seeking youth, afghan youth
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Working Life Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-42279 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-92741-1_12 (DOI)2-s2.0-85063638184 (Scopus ID)978-3-319-92741-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-01-06 Created: 2019-01-06 Last updated: 2019-11-14Bibliographically approved
Asztalos Morell, I. & Gradskova, Y. (2018). Gendering Postsocialism: Old Legacies New Hierarchies. London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gendering Postsocialism: Old Legacies New Hierarchies
2018 (English)Book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

When the Berlin Wall fell in November 1989 and when, two years later, the Soviet Union crumbled and was divided into 15 independent states, the huge space formerly called the Communist Bloc or the countries of state socialism seemed to disappear forever, and an unprecedented process of change began. This process was just as unique from a historical perspective as the earlier attempts to build communism and/or state socialism. The changes had different speeds and directions, and while some states embraced the process of democratisation in order to “return to Europe”, others were experimenting with the ideals of a strong authoritarian state, religion, and a “return to tradition” to build a new society.

 

Now, however, nearly 30 years later, the different countries of this huge geographical space often continue to be addressed according to their common past, or as countries still in a state of transition or transformation from their previous condition – as postsocialist. In some cases the communist past seems to have been totally overcome, and these countries are recognized as European and democratic states with well-functioning market economies (as in the case of many countries that have joined the European Union). However, their position in the formerly socialist space can suddenly be remembered in exceptional circumstances, like during the refugee crisis of 2015 (Dalakoglou, 2016). In other cases, the changes do not seem to be thorough due to the emergence of authoritarian regimes and corruption. Thus, the states that have experienced slower changes are more frequently referred to through their past as “formerly” or “post” socialist.

 

In deference to these temporal interpretations, following Madina Tlostanova, we approach postsocialism not only in temporal terms, but also in spatial terms – as a space populated by millions of people whose experience is “underconceptualized” in the analysis of globalisation (Tlostanova, 2017, pp. 1-3). In choosing to analyse postsocialism as a “critical standpoint” in order to avoid the essencialisation of the region (Stella, 2015, p.133), we consider it important to explore gendered changes focusing on institutions, discourses, memories, identities, and fantasies that in one way or another connect to this postsocialist condition.

 

 Although taking place in varied shapes and degrees, the dismantlement of state socialism and the emergence of “capitalism” in the former state socialist countries led to radical shifts in their economies as well as in the welfare state’s involvement in social citizenship. Gender relations were a key arena for the moulding of state-socialist citizenship where institutions, guarding women’s reproductive rights as well as their work opportunities, were raised to create the ideal socialist citizen. Gender norms and gender relations have also been a prime field for forming the postsocialist citizen. While we assume that the bondage between economic regimes and gender norms is not deterministic (Asztalos Morell, 1999), the contributions to this book further explore the connectivity between gender and economy without assuming reductionist causality or restricting the sphere of gender norms to the sphere of economic importance.

 

Thus, the main aim of this book is to explore changing gendered norms and expectations in relation to the postsocialist transformation in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. We explore how the gendered legacies of state socialism are entangled with the geopolitical re-orientation of the region and the simultaneity of socio-economic, political, and cultural changes in this geographical space. How are gender expectations shaped in the conflict between impulses towards more gender equality versus the re-naturalisation/re-traditionalisation of gender norms, and how are the new gender norms entangled with the neoliberal economic demands, precarities, “multifaceted injustice” (Suchland, 2015, p. 188), new forms of socio-economic differentiation, and insecurities?How can the analysis of gender norms and expectations in the space of former state socialism contribute to a study of global developments in gender relationships?

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2018
National Category
Social Sciences Humanities and the Arts Sociology
Research subject
Working Life Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-42278 (URN)2-s2.0-85047339721 (Scopus ID)978-1-138-29606-0 (ISBN)978-1-315-10025-8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-01-06 Created: 2019-01-06 Last updated: 2019-11-14Bibliographically approved
Asztalos Morell, I., Greenfields, M. & Smith, D. M. (2018). Governing underprivileged Roma migrations within the EU: Receiving country responses and Roma resilience. Local Economy, 33(2), 123-126
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Governing underprivileged Roma migrations within the EU: Receiving country responses and Roma resilience
2018 (English)In: Local Economy, ISSN 0269-0942, E-ISSN 1470-9325, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 123-126Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD, 2018
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-39296 (URN)10.1177/0269094218767329 (DOI)000432096600001 ()2-s2.0-85046817514 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-05-24 Created: 2018-05-24 Last updated: 2019-11-12
Darvishpour, M., Asztalos Morell, I., Månsson, N., Mahmoodian, M. & Hoppe, M. (2018). Sammanfattning av arbetsrapport om  nyanlända barns och ungdomars inkludering  och jämställdhetsutveckling.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sammanfattning av arbetsrapport om  nyanlända barns och ungdomars inkludering  och jämställdhetsutveckling
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2018 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Publisher
p. 10
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-42241 (URN)
Available from: 2018-12-30 Created: 2018-12-30 Last updated: 2019-11-15Bibliographically approved
Asztalos Morell, I. (2018). ‘Solidarity not alms’: Civil rights movements contesting the evictions and denial of social rights from vulnerable European Union citizens in Sweden. Local Economy, 33(2), 147-171
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘Solidarity not alms’: Civil rights movements contesting the evictions and denial of social rights from vulnerable European Union citizens in Sweden
2018 (English)In: Local Economy, ISSN 0269-0942, E-ISSN 1470-9325, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 147-171Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The chief aims of the Swedish municipality-based Facebook network SEM, ‘Solidarity with EU migrants’ [Solidaritet med EU migranter!] are to fight for better conditions and humane treatment of migrants primarily from Romania, who came to Sweden in hope of finding work and the ability to provide for their families. The site is to transmit relevant news, actions, organise money collections, political actions and alike. Those volunteers active in the group believe that ‘righteousness and solidarity’ should apply, even those who are in the grip of European Union bureaucracy.1 Using theories of civil movements in the IT age, I elaborate on how the activists on the site respond to the challenges of the criminalisation of vulnerable European Union citizens, by balancing their engagement between the dimensions of ‘pragmatic voluntarism’ versus ‘subversive humanitarianism’. Furthermore, I explore how the site counteracts hegemonic master narratives on Roma as both idle and victims, who need to be saved from begging, by providing alternative narratives of subjectivities and identities to the Roma men and women they work with and for, seeing them as agents struggling to improve the lives of their families.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
Roma, EU migrant, civil movement, municipality, citizenship, EU, Romania
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Working Life Studies; Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-39145 (URN)10.1177/0269094218767073 (DOI)000432096600003 ()2-s2.0-85046809314 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Negotiating poverty
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2018-05-06 Created: 2018-05-06 Last updated: 2019-11-14Bibliographically approved
Asztalos Morell, I. (2018). The agency of Roma women’s NGO in marginalised rural municipalities in Hungary. In: Gendering Postsocialism: Old Legacies and New Hierarchies: (pp. 121-137). Taylor and Francis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The agency of Roma women’s NGO in marginalised rural municipalities in Hungary
2018 (English)In: Gendering Postsocialism: Old Legacies and New Hierarchies, Taylor and Francis , 2018, p. 121-137Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In the postsocialist period, Roma women have been recurrently politicised as undeserving mothers, giving birth to too many children and abusing the generous state-financed childcare support system (Durst, 2001; Asztalos Morell, 2017). Less common is to portray Roma women’s agency and resistance towards such allegations. One such example is the protest action by 369 Roma women from two villages who pressed charges against the mayor in one of the neighbouring villages for defamation. The mayor stated at a municipal meeting: In villages where the majority of inhabitants are Roma … women consume by intention such medicine, that leads to the birth of crazy [bolond] children, in order to get entitlement to double family benefits … I have checked, and it is true that a pregnant woman hit her stomach with a rubber hammer in order to give birth to handicapped child. (Origo, 2009) Similar conflicts indicate the sensitivity of local community cohesion and highlight the broken trust between municipal administrations and the local Roma communities. Such cleavages have intensified in the context of the crises of the postsocialist socio-economic transition that have left peripheral rural communities in a state of continuous decline. © 2018 selection and editorial matter, Yulia Gradskova and Ildikó Asztalos Morell; individual chapters, the contributors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor and Francis, 2018
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-39371 (URN)000460604300008 ()2-s2.0-85047349438 (Scopus ID)9781351585583 (ISBN)9781138296060 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-05-31 Created: 2018-05-31 Last updated: 2019-11-12
Asztalos Morell, I. & Gradskova, Y. (2018). The gendered subject of postsocialism: State-socialist legacies, global challenges and (re)building of tradition. In: Gendering Postsocialism: Old Legacies and New Hierarchies: (pp. 1-17). Taylor and Francis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The gendered subject of postsocialism: State-socialist legacies, global challenges and (re)building of tradition
2018 (English)In: Gendering Postsocialism: Old Legacies and New Hierarchies, Taylor and Francis , 2018, p. 1-17Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

When the Berlin Wall fell in November 1989 and when, two years later, the Soviet Union crumbled and was divided into 15 independent states, the huge space formerly called the Communist Bloc or the countries of state socialism seemed to disappear forever, and an unprecedented process of change began. This process was just as unique from a historical perspective as the earlier attempts to build communism and/or state socialism. The changes had different speeds and directions, and while some states embraced the process of democratisation in order to “return to Europe”, others were experimenting with the ideals of a strong authoritarian state, religion, and a “return to tradition” to build a new society.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor and Francis, 2018
National Category
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-39370 (URN)000460604300001 ()2-s2.0-85047357383 (Scopus ID)9781351585583 (ISBN)9781138296060 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-05-31 Created: 2018-05-31 Last updated: 2019-06-12Bibliographically approved
Projects
Familjen och den starka staten i ett Östeuropa/Östersjöperspektiv: frigörelse eller tvång? [A082-2007_OSS]; Södertörn University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3442-187X

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